Chronic Wasting Disease and Cervidae Regulations in North America
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State/
Province
BanCervid
Imports
Banned
Legal ReferenceRegulated
by wildlife
or Ag
Agency (with jurisdiction over captive cervids )
and Contacts
Standard Regulations (listed only if different or in addition to those listed in Summary below)Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Regulations for Captive Cervids and WildlifeIn Process of Developing or Implementing New or Additional CWD RegulationsCWD Testing Program for Captive CervidsCWD Testing Program for WildlifeBaiting BannedFeeding BannedBan on Movement of Animal PartsCWD Found in Captive CervidsCWD Found in Free- Ranging Cervids
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Summary46
States:
Y: 19
N: 28
Unclear: 3

Provinces:
Y: 3
N: 8
Unclear: 0
links to regulatory, statutory, executive or constitutional sections related to this topicIn nine states and five of the Canadian provinces listed, the state's Department of Agriculture, or equivalent, has jurisdiction over captive cervids. The Department of Fish and Game, or equivalent has jurisdiction in nine states and four of the provinces listed. Captive cervid farms are jointly managed by both agencies in thirty-two states and two of the eleven listed Canadian provinces. In Canada, The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), manages the national disease control program for captive cervids, and the national standards and audit portions of the voluntary herd certification program (VHCP).
Contact at CFIA is Amanda Amaratunga, amanda.amaratunga@inspection.gc.ca
Standard Regulations are: 1)Certification of Veterinary Inspection (health certificate), 2)Import Permit, 3)Negative brucellosis test (within 30-60 days of import), 4)Negative tuberculosis test (within 30-90 days of import)Thirty-one states and six of the Canadian provinces listed prohibit the importation of cervids from any county, region and/or state that is endemic for CWD; have regulations that can prohibit importation from endemic areas; require that the state exporting the cervid be enrolled in an official CWD monitoring and certification program; and/or require only that there has been no diagnosis of CWD in the originating herd or imported cervid. Seventeen states and two of the Canadian provinces listed have banned all cervid imports. Two states and three of the Canadian provinces listed have no specific rules listed. In Canada, national disease control of CWD falls primarily under the Health of Animals Act, and Health of Animals Regulations.Sixteen states and four of the Canadian provinces listed are currently in the process of developing new and/or additional CWD regulations. The CFIA is currently reviewing its national CWD disease control program, and national standards for the vountary herd certification program. CFIA's federal import requirements for live cervids from the USA are currently in the process of being updated as well.Forty-five states and ten of the Canadian provinces listed perform captive cervid testing for CWD where captive cervids are legal. In addition, a portion of the sureveillance testing and all confirmatory testing from across Canada takes place at CFIA's national OIE reference lab for CWD.All fifty states and ten of the Canadian provinces listed perform some level of CWD testing on wild cervids. Currently, a portion of the surveillance and all confirmatory testing from across Canada takes place at CFIA's national OIE reference lab for CWD.Twenty-two states do not allow the baiting of cervid and, eleven states have certain restrictions on baiting. Three of the Canadian provinces listed have banned baiting.Nine states and three of the Canadian provinces listed do not allow the feeding of cervids and thirteen states and one province have certain restrictions.Thirty-nine states and seven of the Canadian provinces listed have a ban or restrictions on the importation of hunter-harvested cervid parts.CWD has been found in captive cervids in fifteen states and two Canadian provinces (CO, IA, KS, MI, MN, MO, MT, NE, NY,
OH, OK, PA, SD, UT,
WI, Alberta, and Saskatchewan).
CWD has been found in free -ranging cervids in twenty-one states and two Canadian provinces (AR, CO, IA, IL, KS, MD, MI, MN,
MO, ND, NE, NM, NY,
PA, SD, TX, UT, VA,
WI, WV, WY, Alberta and Saskatchewan).
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States
4
AlabamaYYWildlifeDepartment of Conservation and Natural Resources. Contact: chris.cook@dcnr.alabama.govCervid imports have not been allowed since 1973. It is illegal to have penned deer, several high fenced areas do exist. Game breeders can buy and sell deer with permit but no importation is allowed.
Approximately 21 "grandfathered" propagators are permitted to keep, breed, and release deer into an enclosure. Permitted propagators can't add animals to their captive facility from the wild. Propagation permits are no longer issued.
Cervid imports have not been allowed since 1973.NA - Have not allowed imports for over 40 years.Animals from captive herds are included in the state CWD sampling program.Sampling began in 2001, with 90 animals being tested. In 2002-03, 440 animals
were tested; 2003-04, 768 were tested; 2004-05, 745 tested; 2005-06, 798 tested;
2006-07, 654 tested; 2007-08, 627 tested; 2008-09, 606 tested; 2009-10 311
tested; 2010-11 311 tested; 2011-2012 304 tested; 2012-2013 299 tested; 2014-
2015 302 tested, 2015-16 308 tested. All animals have tested negative to date. Plan to continue surveillance efforts. Education efforts have also made the public more aware of the need to report deer that may be doing poorly or may not be acting normally. Those deer are submitted for testing as well. Mandatory testing of animals 12 months of age or older that die in captive herds.
Baiting is not allowed.Alabama law does not allow feeding on or over the "area" where hunters are attempting to kill or take game animals. A recently enacted regulation states "there shall be a rebuttable presumption that any bait or feed located beyond 100 yards from the hunter and not within the line of sight of the hunter is not a lure, attraction, or enticement to, on or over the area where the hunter is attempting to kill or take deer or feral swine. For the purpose of this regulation, "not within the line of sight" means being hidden from view by natural vegetation or naturally occurring terrain features.No ban.NoNo
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AlaskaNNAgricultureDept of Natural Resources-Division of Agriculture responsible for game farm permits and inspecting fencing. Dept of Environmental Conservation- Division of Environmental Health responsible for animal health regulations. Dept of Fish & Game- Division of Wildlife Conservation responsible for free-ranging cerivds. Contact: Department of Environmental Conservation (captive cervids) Dr. Bob Gerlach Bob.Gerlach@alaska.gov, ADF&G- Division of Wildlife Conservation (free-ranging cervids) Kimberlee Beckmen, kimberlee.beckmen@alaska.govImported cervids must have a certificate of veterinary inspection, state import permit, individual animal id traceable to the premises of origin, negative TB and Brucellosis, originate from a CWD low risk herd as defined by 9 CFR 55.23 (five years of surveillance) that is enrolled in an official CWD monitoring and surveillance program that is consistent with 9 CFR 55.23.Imported cervids must have a certificate of veterinary inspection, state import permit, individual animal id traceable to the premises of origin, negative TB and Brucellosis, originate from a CWD low risk herd as defined by 9 CFR 55.23 (five years of surveillance) that is enrolled in an official CWD monitoring and surveillance program consistent with 9 CFR 55.23.Intrastate movement of captive cervids rerquires permit from State Veterinarian.Voluntary Certification Program that is consistent with 9 CFR 55.23 (5 years to achieve CWD low risk certified status) has been established and supports testing for captive cervids.Targeted and voluntary hunter harvested surveillance of deer and elk began in 2003 with moose and caribou targeted surveillance added in 2004. Hunter harvest surveillance discontinued in 2009. Targeted surveillance scaled back to within 5 miles of an elk facility in March 2012. CWD surveillance other than clinical suspects has been discontinued. In 2013 -1966 SBT deer, 89 elk, 119 caribou and 740 moose have been tested, all negative for CWD. Surveillance discontinued in 2014. Only clinical suspects or necropsy cases tested.No baiting allowed.No feeding allowed.The importation of whole carcasses and certain carcass parts from cervidae (including mule deer, white-tailed deer, black-tailed deer and elk) and other CWD susceptible species into the state of Alaska is banned. Importation of carcass parts from such species is restricted to: de-boned meat (cut and wrapped, commercially or privately); quarters or other meat portions with no portion of the spinal column (including dorsal root ganglion) or head attached; processed meat (cut and wrapped commercially or privately); hides with no
heads attached; clean and disinfected skull plates; antlers with no meat or tissue attached; clean and disinfected whole skull (European mount) - no meat or nervous tissue (brain, cranial nerves) attached; and teeth (upper canines or buglers).
NoNo
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ArizonaYYWildlifeGame and Fish Department. Contact: Anne Justice-Allen, (623) 236-7351, ajustice- allen@azgfd.govEffective 30 August 2003, no cervid can be imported into Arizona with the exception that under specific conditions, non-native cervids can be imported into a licensed zoo. No other exceptions exist.Effective 30 August 2003, no cervid can be imported into Arizona except for zoos under specific conditions. Cervids held under special license must be identified with a microchip or tattoo as prescribed by rule; census of all cervids on property (births, deaths, and exportation) must be included in the report. Any cervid that dies must be submitted for CWD testing within 72- hours of death. Movement of cervids within the state is regulated. The Department is authorized to seize, destroy, and dispose of any cervid (at the owner’s expense) held illegally.Rules related to CWD were instituted on 30 August 2003. A new rule took effect 1 July 2013.The holder of a private game farm or zoo license is required to submit all cervids over one year of age that die or are killed for CWD testing. This rulemaking also requires permanent marking of all animals on site and annual reports providing information on births, deaths, or other transactions involving captive cervids.The Department began testing for CWD in 1998 and has to date tested over 19,000 samples. Monitoring continues with voluntary testing of hunter-harvested cervids and targeted sampling of symptomatic and roadkilled individuals.
Monitoring in Arizona is concentrated in the game management units bordering Utah and New Mexico to maximize detection in areas of higher concern. As of February 2015, CWD has not been detected in Arizona. Additional information can be found on the Department’s website at https://azgfdportal.az.gov/.
Yes, according to Article 3 R12-4- 303, edible baits and cervid urine based attractants may not be used to take deer or elk. Normal livestock feeding and supplementation is exempted.Yes, according to Title 13-2927, it is unlawful to intentionally, knowingly or recklessly feed, attract, or otherwise entice wildlife into an area (except for tree squirrels and birds).Yes, according to Article 3 R12-4-305, out-of-state hunters can only bring in boneless portion of meat or packaged meat, finished taxidermy mounts, cleaned skulls, teeth (whistlers), and cleaned hides. A private game farm license holder may transport a cervid lawfully killed or slaughtered at the license holder's game farm to a licensed meat processor. An individual may possess or transport only the following portions of a cervid lawfully killed or slaightered at a private game farm: boneless portions of meat or packaged meat, finished taxidermy mounts, cleaned skulls, teeth (whistlers), and cleaned hides.NoNo
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ArkansasYYWildlifeGame and Fish Commission regulates imports relating to wildlife, Livestock & Poultry Commission regulates imports relating to livestock. A Memorandum of Agreement between the two agencies delegates final permitting authority to Game and Fish. Contact: Cory Gray, AG&FC 877-367-3559; Cory.Gray@agfc.ar.gov09/26/02: Total ban on importation of live cervids. 4/18/13: Restrictions on importation of cervid carcasses from all locations outside of Arkansas..09/26/02: Total ban on importation of live cervids.State CWD Respose Plan has been completed and approved. Currently in process of sampling to determine prevalance and spatial distribution (3/22/16).All captive cervids that die from illness, slaughter, hunting or any other cause shall be reported within 24 hours and submitted for CWD testing.Arkansas has completed random testing in all 75 counties of the state. State currently is decreasing sample sizes and will focus on target animals and captive cervids. Additional surveillance has not been finalized at the date of this report due to ongoing sampling.NoNoNot allowed to import, transport or possess any porition of a cervid carcass from any area outside the boundaries of Arkansas except: antlers and/ or antlers attached to clean skull plates or cleaned skulls (where no meat or tissues are attached to skull), meat with bones removed, cleaned teeth, finished taxidermy products, hides, and tanned products. Regulation also applies to any cervid taken from a captive facility or from within any enclosure regardless of state.NoYes, elk and WTD
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CaliforniaNN
(limited,
see column F)
WildlifeDepartment of Fish & Wildlife (CDFW) has authority over all captive cervids and issues the permits required for possession. Department of Food & Agriculture (DFA) becomes the lead over captive cervids only if a disease outbreak occurs which could impact livestock (TB and brucellosis). Contact: Brandon Munk (CDFW), (916) 358- 1194, brandon.munk@wildlife.ca.govFallow deer are permitted under a fallow deer farming permit and various exotic cervids are allowed under an exhibitors permit issued by CA Dept. of Fish and Wildlife. No elk are permitted for importation and elk farms are prohibited. To import any deer a Cervidae Importation Application must be approved by Wildlife Investigations Lab; MI cervids require specific pre-entry requirements.No cervids allowed for import that originate from CWD positive states, or have a history of contact with captive elk, or any other potential risk.Regulation banning the import of hunter-harvested cervids adopted in June 2003 (CA Code of Regulations, Title 14, Section 712). Citations are being issued to hunters not compliant with this regulation, and meat processors are not allowed to accept out-of-state whole cervid carcasses not compliant with regulation.CWD is listed by the CA Department of Food & Agriculture as a reportable disease. A slaughter surveillance program for farmed fallow deer has been developed.Developed surveillance in 1999 for hunter killed, road kill and dead, free-ranging mule deer. As of Sept. 2012 approximately 5,000 deer and elk have been tested. California has completed random surveillance of hunter-harvested and road-killed cervids. Only "CWD suspects" are sampled and tested.CA Code of Regulations, Title 14, Section 251.3, effective 09/01/79: Prohibition against taking resident game birds and mammals by the aid of bait.CA Code of Regulations, Title 14, Section 251.3, effective 07/01/96: Prohibition against feeding big game mammals.CA Code of Regulations, Title 14, Section 712, effective 6/05/03: Ban on importation of hunter harvested deer and elk carcasses. Except, portions of meat with no part of spinal column or head attached; hides or capes with no spinal column, brain tissue, or head attached; clean skull plates, no brain tissue may be present; antlers with no meat or tissue attached; finished taxidermy mounts with no meat or tissue attached; and upper canines.NoNo
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Colorado*NNBothColorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) regulates wildlife imports and has authority over commercially raised mule deer and other commercially raised wildlife species. The Department of Agriculture has authority over disease management for alternative livestock (fallow deer and elk). Authority over possession, importation, and movement of alternative livestock (elk and fallow deer) is shared, and CWD management in alternative livestock facilities requires CPW approval of the herd plan.
Moratorium on new licensing of cervid ranches by CPW; CDA is licensing new alternative livestock facilities. Contact: Mike Miller, CPW, (970) 472- 4348, mike.miller@state.co.us Regulations: Brett Ackerman, CPW (303) 291-7278,
brett.ackerman@state.co.us
All cervids must be free of infectious and contagious disease; must be treated for internal/external parasites within 21 days prior to entry, must be marked with USDA official ear tag, and originate from a bovine TB-free accredited herd. All elk must test negative for evidence of red deer hybridization.60 months CWD-free status from qualifying surveillance program required for importation and intrastate movement of captive cervids. CPW and CDA jointly review all requests for cervid movement - both agencies must approve; CDA issues the movement/importation authorization.Mandatory surveillance required on any captive cervid death (>16 months of age) whether natural death, slaughter or hunt park kill (fresh and fixed tissue). Must be reported within 24 hours of death to licensing agency (CPW or CDA).CWD testing available statewide for successful deer and elk hunters for nominal fee. Fee waived for any mandatory submission. Testing currently mandatory for all hunter-killed moose statewide, no other species have mandatory testing. As of 9/1/2006, Director has authority to administratively impose mandatory hunter testing by unit to meet sampling objectives. Tested 24,652 in 2002; 15,424 in 2003. In 2004 tested 12,966 (5,636 deer, 7,219 elk and 101 moose). Tested
13,208 (6,481 mule deer, 215 white-tailed deer (WTD), 6,358 elk and 154 moose) in 2005. First case of CWD in moose 9/25/2005. Tested 11,107 (5,243 mule deer, 228 WTD, 5,489 elk and147 moose) in 2006. In 2007, tested 10,009 (4,487 mule
deer, 197 WTD, 4,835 elk, and 130 moose). In 2008, tested 6,389 (3,196 mule
deer, 90 WTD, 2,893 elk, 210 moose). In 2009, tested 3,696 (1,484 mule deer, 89
WTD, 1,957 elk, and 166 moose). In 2010, tested 2,820 (1,130 mule deer, 81
WTD, 1,464 elk, and 145 moose). In 2011, tested 2,100 (1,019 mule deer, 74 WTD, 859 elk, and148 moose). For current testing data please refer to the following site: http://wildlife.state.co.us/Hunting/BigGame/CWD/
Big Game baiting illegal.Feeding of certain wildlife species, including big game, is illegal.In January 2008 the Wildlife Commission struck the regulation on transportation of cracass parts and encouraged an educational effort focused on disposal of carcass trim.Yes, in elkYes, in mule deer, white- tailed deer, elk, and moose.
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Connecticut*YYAgricultureDepartment of Environmental Protection and Department of AgricultureNo cervid imports allowed. No movements within state without permit.No cervid imports allowed.N/ACapitve cervid owners required to (a) have 2 forms of tagging and (b) have perimeter fence specifications.WTD surveillance program to perform random testing on hunter harvested cervids and road kills from High-risk populations statewide.Hunters are allowed to use bait in 2 out of 12 Deer Management Zones.NABan on importation of hunter-harvested deer and elk from CWD endemic states (unless deboned).NoNo
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Delaware*YYAgriculture, except for whitetailDepartment of Agriculture has jurisdiction over all exotic cervids, while the Division of Fish and
Wildlife has jurisdiction over white-tailed deer. Contact: Joe Rogerson, (302) 735-3600
No cervid imports allowed from any state. No movements within state without permit (no permits are being issued at this time).No cervid imports allowed from any state. No movements within state without permit (no permits are being issued at this time).N/ACurrently discussing this issue with the Delaware Department of Agriculture.In 2003, began testing hunter harvested WTD. Collected 200+ samples within each of the 3 counties during the 2005-06 through the present hunting seasons. This sampling intensity yields a 99% probability of detecting the disease if it is present in at least 1% of the population.No ban.NACarcasses from areas as determined by the Division of Fish & Wildlife where CWD has been reported must be processed prior to entering the state. No spinal cord tissues or brain tissues allowed from these areas. Cleaned skulls, hides, antlers, etc are permitted.NoNo
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Florida*YY
starting
Sep/2013
BothFish & Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) regulates possession of captive cervids, Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services (FDACS) handles movement permits and health requirements. Contact: Cory Morea, Cory.Morea@MyFWC.com, (850) 488-3831Effective September 6, 2013, no cervid imports by executive order. Effective November 11, 2013, no cervid imports by rule. Exceptions allowed for zoos and temporary possession of Reindeer.carry into the state by any means any live deer, elk or other species of the family Cervidae originating from out-of-state unless permitted pursuant to Chapter 68A-6 and as provided herein. (1) Zoos that meet or exceed all applicable Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) accreditation standards (2013 Edition – available at http://www.flrules.org/Gateway/reference.asp?No
=Ref-03316), which are adopted and incorporated herein by reference, are authorized to receive cervids from out-of-state (except for white-tailed deer which shall not be received from out-of-state) from another facility that meets or exceeds all applicable AZA accreditation standards. (2) Any person is authorized to receive Reindeer (Rangifer tarandas ) temporarily, for no longer than 90 days, provided that the reindeer being received have not originated from or been possessed at a premises or facility located in a county or a county adjoining a county where
CWD has been documented, and are not located at a premises or facility in Florida with other species of the family Cervidae.
Cervids being moved shall not be commingled with cervids from other sources during transfer. No person shall violate Chapter 5C-26, F.A.C.
NATesting of captive cervids is voluntary.Implemented active surveillance of hunter-killed and road-killed deer and passive surveillance of symptomatic wild deer in summer 2002. As of May 2014, 7,607 deer have been tested, 391 from passive surveillance and 7,216 from active surveillance. No positives have been detected. FWC plans to continue with the current level of testing - approximately 600-700 free-ranging deer per year.
Additional information is available at www.MyFWC.com/CWD
No ban.No ban.The FWC adopted in 2005 a rule that prohibits the importation or possession of the carcass of any cervid from any state or province where Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) has been documented except boned-out meat or processed meat cuts, a hide with no head attached, antlers with a clean skull plate, finished taxidermy products, and upper canines. Additionally, any cervid carcass, regardless of origin, testing positive for CWD must be surrendered to FWC personnel.NoNo
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Georgia*YYBothThe Department of Natural Resources and Department of Agriculture have joint authority over deer farms. Farmed deer are restricted to fallow, sika, and red deer, elk, caribou and their hybrids. White-tailed deer are not included as farmed deer. Pursuant to OCGA 4-4-170 through 181, the Department of Agriculture administers the deer farming license and provisions relating to health requirements, humane treatment and slaughter. Also, the DNR inspects facilities prior to Ag approval and issuance of deer farming license. Further, the Department of Natural Resources has jurisdiction over escpaed farmed deer. Pursuant to OCGA 27-5-1 through 12
(Wild Animal Act), the DNR has authority over wild animals, which include the cervid species that can be legally farmed in Georgia. Thus, anyone holding any cervid species is required to have a wild animal license to legally possess a cervid other than white-tailed deer.
Contact: Charlie Killmaster, State Deer Biologist, (706) 557-3260,
charlie.killmaster@dnr.state.ga.us
No deer imports allowed.The Georgia General Assembly passed legislation in 2006 that prohibits the importation of any cervid. Prior, the Department had promulgated regulations that prohibited the importation of any cervid.N/AAll farmed deer over six months of age that die other than by slaughter must have samples submitted to an approved veterinary diagnosis laboratory for Chronic Wasting Disease testing. This surveillance may be at the expense of the owner or agent unless supplementary funds are made available. Farmed deer slaughtered in licensed meat establishments must be made available for sample collection and submission to an approved veterinary diagnostic laboratory for Chronic Wasting Disease testing. This surveillance may be at the expense of the owner or agent unless supplementary funds are made available.DNR began a wildlife surveillance program in fall 2002. In 2002-2003, we target tested 317 cervids limited to 6 areas considered to be at greatest risk due to proximity of captive cervid facilities. Additionally, we tested 100 cervids as a part of standard health monitoring. In 2003-2004, program was expanded to statewide and over 6,500 have been collected to date. CWD has not been detected at this time. Additional information is available at www.gohuntgeorgia.com .In the Southern Deer Zone, deer may be hunted over bait on private lands with written permission of the landowner. However, bait shall not be placed in a manner as to cause hunting on an adjacent property to be prohibited. In the Northern Deer Zone, it is unlawful to hunt deer upon, around, over or near any feed or bait when the hunter is less than 200 yards away or within sight of such feed or bait. Any such feed shall not be placed in a manner as to cause hunting on an adjacent property to be prohibited. The placing of any feed or bait and the hunting of deer over such feed or bait on any state or federal lands is prohibited statewide.The DNR Board may by rule or regulation restrict the feeding, baiting, or hunting of deer and/or feral hogs upon, over, around or near such feed or bait in any county and any adjoining county, upon documented occurrence of a communicable disease in deer in such county. No person shall feed, bait or hunt deer and/or feral hogs in violation of any such restriction imposed.It is unlawful to import or possess a whole cervid carcass or cervid carcass part from any state having a documented case of a cervid infected with chronic wasting disease, except for one or more of the following parts: (1) Boned out meat; (2) Portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached;
(3) Hide with no heads attached; (4) Clean skull plates with antlers attached; (5) Clean antlers; (6) Finished taxidermy heads: and (7) Clean upper canine teeth (buglers, whistlers, ivories)
NoNo
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HawaiiNNBothDepartment of Agriculture has authority over import, possession and transfer of all cervids. Department of Land and Natural Resources, Division of Forestry and Wildlife regulates possession of introduced Axis and Black-tailed deer on State lands. Contact: State Game Management Specialist, (808) 587-4185Special permit for elk and axis deer for commercial use. Black-tailed deer and mule deer are permitted for research and exhibition by special permit. White- tailed deer not allowed. Hawaii has only one captive cervid farm (elk) at this time.Wild animal licenses for cervids are conditioned to restrict intrastate movement and require participation in USDA's CWD program for movement.Permits issued on case by case basis. No entry permits for elk or deer will be considered unless they originated from a herd that has been CWD monitored for at least 5 years.Only a few animals are slaughtered annually at the single location of captive cervids (elk) in Hawaii. Testing is not mandatory, and has not been conducted for the last several years.Surveillance from hunter killed deer began in 2003. Five to ten (5-10) black-tailed deer are tested from the 30-50 annually harvested; and 30-40 axis deer from the approx. 350 harvested. Reports of sick and abnormal deer are investigated by Forestry and Wildlife.No ban at this time.No ban at this time.No ban at this time.NoNo
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IdahoYY
(partial, see
col F)
AgricultureIdaho State Department of Agriculture/Animal Industries has jurisdiction over domestic cervidae, which includes elk, fallow deer and reindeer.
Idaho Department of Fish and Game has jurisdiction over importation and possession of all other species of wildlife. Contact: Mark Drew, Wildlife Veterinarian, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, mark.drew@idfg.idaho.gov
No mule deer or white-tailed deer imports allowed by IDFG. ISDA allows import of reindeer, elk and fallow deer to approved cervidae farms. Health requirements include: negative brucellosis testing for cervids 6 months and older, must have 2 negative tests within 30 days of import; negative tuberculosis tests and compliance with USDA TB UMR for captive cervids; elk must test negative for red deer genetic factor and be in a CWD monitoring program for at least 60 months with a CWD free herd status and records of all deaths within last 5 years; the certificate of veterinary inspection accompanying the cervidae shipment must contain the following written statement from the accredited veterinarian on the certificate: “No cervids identified on this certificate of veterinary inspection have displayed symptoms consistent with P. tenuis infection. These cervids have neither been exposed to P. tenuis nor originated from premises where P. tenuis has been identified.”; all cervidae are required to receive anthelminthic, approved for treatment of P. tenuis, within thirty (30) days prior to import into Idaho.
Treatment must be documented on the certificate of veterinary inspection; valid health certificate from state of origin; individual identification number; entry permit.
Elk must be in a CWD monitoring program in originating state for at least 60 months with a CWD free herd status and records of all deaths within last 5 years must be provided. No
domestic cervids allowed from areas where CWD is endemic. All domestic cervidae must originate from a herd that is in good standing and actively participating in the National CWD Herd Certification Program. No wild cervid importation allowed without CWD information from originating state herds.
CWD response plan has been developed for Idaho Fish and Game with containment measures to be taken if CWD is found in captive or wild cervids.CWD monitoring has been done on all domestic elk herds through Department of Agriculture.
Unless a domestic cervidae ranch is operating under an approved ranch management plan, brain tissue from no less than 10% of all domestic cervidae 16 months of age or older that are harvested on domestic cervidae ranches shall be submitted for CWD testing. Brain tissue from 100% of all domestic cervidae 16 months of age or older that die for any reason other than harvest shall be submitted for CWD testing. ID has less than 6 captive mule and white-tailed deer facilities all of which are required to report any deaths within 24 hr.
General and targeted surveillance has been done on over 11,000 deer and elk taken from hunter kills and road kills since 1997.Idaho does not allow and has never allowed the baiting of cervids.Idaho State Department of Agriculture has rules regarding the feeding of cervids by private individuals in eastern Idaho along the Wyoming border to reduce brucellosis risk. Idaho Fish and Game (IDFG) has a commission policy of feeding cervids only on an emergency basis in the winter.Idaho does not have a ban on importation of hunter-harvested cervids. Hunters are cautioned that they should know and comply with regulations in the state in which they will hunt.NoNo
16
Illinois*NNBothDepartment of Agriculture processes and administers import applications and oversees captive cervid CWD monitoring program.
Department of Natural Resources administers Captive Game Breeder licensing program. Both have authority over importation and possession. Contact: Paul Shelton, (217) 557-1052, paul.shelton@illinois.gov
All elk entering Illinois 6 months and older must originate from a brucellosis-free herd or be negative to a brucellosis card test, standard plate agglutination (SPT) test, or complement fixation (CF) test within 60 days of import, certification of brucellosis free herds shall be established and maintained in accordance with the Brucellosis Uniform Methods and Rules approved by USAHA; All cervids must be in compliance with Illinois Diseased Animals Act, 8 Ill.
Adm. Code 85 and Ill Bovidae and Cervidae Tuberculosis Eradication Act; Must be accompanied by a permit from IDA and a CVI; See specific regulations relating to CWD at right, must have approved unique official identification plus secondary identifier.
CVI must state that cervid does not originate from a CWD endemic area (any county and surrounding counties where CWD has been diagnosed in the past 5 years); must originate from a herd that has been CWD monitored for at least 5 years under a state/federally approved
CWD certification program and was CWD free for that period and must meet the following criteria: any additions to herd must be natural or in herd for at least one year, complete records must be maintained for 5 years, animals have not been exposed to any animal from a herd diagnosed with CWD in the past 5 years, herd has been under vet supervision for a minimum of 5 years and has no exposure to any cervid from a CWD trace-back or trace-forward herd, statement must be signed by herd owner stating that all information on CVI is correct.
Implementing some minor changes to ensure compatibility with Federal CWD regulations. State expects to move from "Provisional" to "Approved" status in the federal CWD Herd Certification Program this summer.Any cervid dying from an unknown cause or that has been euthanized that has exhibited neurological disorder must be tested for CWD; any cervid exhibiting symptoms of CWD will be destroyed and tested or quarantined until it can be determined that the animal does not have CWD. Two 'voluntary' CWD herd monitoring programs have been established ("Certified Monitored vs. "Contained Monitored") - intrastate movement or sales of cervids will be contingent upon participation in one of the programs. To date, no captive cervids have tested positive for CWD.More than 89,000 wild deer have been tested since 1998, with the first positive found in October 2002. To date (October 28, 2015) 540 positive deer have been identified from 16 counties (Jo Daviess, Stephenson, Boone, Winnebago, McHenry, Ogle, DeKalb, Kane, LaSalle, Du Page, Kendall, Grundy, Lake, Will, Kankakee and Livingston) in northern Illinois.12/27/02: (17 Ill. Adm. Code 635.40):Ban on feeding of wild deer and wildlife in areas where wild deer are present. Ban includes food, salt, mineral blocks and other food products, with some exceptions such as squirrel and birds feeders close to homes and incidental feeding within livestock facilities.12/27/02: (17 Ill. Adm. Code 635.40):Ban on feeding of wild deer and wildlife in areas where wild deer are present. Ban includes food, salt, mineral blocks and other food products, with some exceptions such as squirrel and birds feeders close to homes and incidental feeding within livestock facilities.12/27/02: (17 Ill. Adm. Code 635.30): prohibits the importation of hunter- harvested deer and elk carcasses into Illinois with the exception of deboned meat, antlers, antlers attached to skull caps, upper canine teeth, and finished taxidermist mounts. 07/25/03: Hunters may bring in deer and/or elk carcasses if they are brought to a licensed meat processor or licensed taxidermist within 72 hours of entering the state.NoYes
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IndianaNNAgricultureDepartment of Natural Resources and State Board of Animal Health. Contact: Dawn Slack dslack@dnr.in.gov. For IN BOAH
Contact: Dr. Shelly Chavis; schavis@boah.in.gov; 260-450-2139 or Paula Livers, plivers@boah.in.gov; 317-544-2395
For movement into state, rules applicable to elk, wapiti, moose, red deer, sika deer, Japanese deer, Japanese sika deer, spotted deer, Japanese spotted deer, mule deer, white-tailed deer, including hybrids and any species diagnosed with CWD. For these species, the state of origin must have animal health officials with authority to quarantine for CWD; have state law requiring CWD positives to be reported to animal health officials, engage in surveillance for
CWD in captive and free-ranging populations, must not have had CWD diagnosed in any cervid within the last 5 years. The herd of origin must be enrolled in a CWD monitoring program for at least 5 years and no animal in, from or traced to the herd may have been diagnosed with CWD within the last 5 years. Permit from state veterinarian required to move live animal. Other health requirements including tuberculosis and brucellosis testing may be required for some movements.
After meeting state of origin and herd of origin requirments (see standard regulations), the individual animal can not have origniated from a state with CWD in the captive or wild cervids less than five years prior to the request for importation. Also, cervids must come from a herd that contains no animals moved within the last 60 months from a farm currently under quarantine for CWD positive or exposed animals. All applicants must submit a list of animals purchased into the herd of origin during the 60 months prior to the date of the pre-entry application. This list must include the name and address of the herd from which each animal was purchased.CWD Response Plan has been reviewed and updated by INBOAH and INDNR 2013. Indiana has "Approved" status in the federal CWD Herd Certification Program.Producers with CWD susceptible species must join the CWD Registered Program or the CWD Certification Program. Non-CWD susceptible species may join either program voluntarily. The CWD Certification Program requires identification, record-keeping, and sampling of all deads over one year of age. Cervids in the Certification Progarm gain status required for interstate movement.From 2002 through 2015, 18,054 deer have been tested and no positives have been found. Testing will continue for additional hunter harvested samples and road killed deer.Baiting banned. Up to $500 fine and 60 days in jail for violation.No ban at this time.Fall 2005 : Importation of carcasses and parts from CWD-susceptible species is restricted to one of the following: (1) Carcasses without the head, spinal cord, and small intestine attached. (2) Carcasses with the head, spinal cord or small intestine attached may enter the state if they are delivered directly to a licensed meat processor, a registered deer processor, or a licensed taxidermist.
Businesses accepting these carcasses must dispose of offal via landfill, commercial incinerator, or rendering. (3) Clean antlers, hides, teeth, and finished taxidermist mounts may enter without restrictions.
NoNo
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IowaNNCertificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI). All Cervidae imported into the state shall be accompanied by a CVI. c. All Cervidae imported into this state, except Cervidae consigned directly to a recognized slaughter establishment, must have a pre-entry permit. The permit number must be requested by the licensed accredited veterinarian signing the CVI and issued by the state veterinarian prior to movement of the Cervidae. The permit number must be recorded on the CVI.AgricultureDepartment of Agriculture and Land Stewardship. Contact: David Schmitt, DVM - State Veterinarian David.Schmitt@iowaagriculture.gov
515-281-8601 or Dee Clausen - 515-281-8236
Permanent official identification number. Captive cervids native to or originating from any county or region under quarantine for TB not eligible for import. All Cervidae 6 months and older must test negative for Brucellosis within 90 days of importation or originate from a certified brucellosis-free herd.
Cervidae less than 6 months must originate from a herd which has tested negative for brucellosis within the past 12 months or from a certified brucellosis- free herd. All Cervidae 6 months and older must test negative for TB utilizing the single cervical test within 90 days of importation, or originate from a TB accredited herd or from a TB qualified herd which has been tested within 90 days of import. Test dates must be included on the certificate of veterinary inspection. Herd status and testing protocols are according to the USDA TB Eradication in Cervidae Uniform Methods and Rules. Cervidae less than 6 months imported into the state must originate from a herd which has been whole-herd tested TB negative within the past 12 months or originate from a TB accredited herd.
Administrative Rules Modifying Importation Requirements of Cervidae, 1/26/05: No cervid originating from or having been located within a 30 mile radius area endemic for CWD allowed, no cervid from herd having animal introductions from area considered endemic to CWD during last 5 years, all require entry permit issued by the state veterinarian, CVI must state no diagnosis, signs, or epidemiological evidence of CWD in originating herd for year previous to import. All cervids in originating herd must have been there for at least 1 year or have been natural addition, herd must have no evidence or diagnosis of CWD, cervid must originate from certified or monitored CWD herd, with the CWD herd no., anniversary date, expiration date and herd status for each animal listed on the CVI. All CWD susceptible cervidae shall only be allowed from herds which are enrolled in and satisfactorily completed at least five years in an official recognized CWD monitoring program.To meet the new Federal rules requirements, Iowa rules effective November 1, 2012, will require CWD testing of all Iowa captive CWD suseceptible cervid mortalities or slaughtered animals that are 12 months of age and older in CWD Program enrolled herds.Voluntary surveillance for elk and deer, but no purchase or movement is allowed from herds not enrolled in a program.Have tested 57,792 wild white-tailed deer since surveillance began in 2002. First positive in the wild was found from surveillance in 2013/14 deer season in Allamakee County in NE Iowa. To date 6 total positives found - all in Allamakee County.Baiting prohibited.No ban.Ban on the importation of a whole carcass from any cervid taken from a CWD endemic area within any state or province, may only transport boned-out meat, capes, and antlers attached to clean skull plates from which the brain tissue has been removed.Yes - 297 captive deer and 1 elk from 4 facilities, three facilities have been depopulated.Yes - six free-ranging white-tailed deer, all in Allamakee County.
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KansasNNAgricultureKansas Department of Agriculture Division of Animal Health (KDAH) has jurisdiction over captive cervids. Contact Dr. Paul Grosdidier, paul.grosdidier@kda.ks.gov, (785) 564-6601. Or Visit our web page at www.agriculture.ks.gov/animalhealthAll cervids regardless of age changing ownership, alive or dead with Kansas must have and official identification, and be accompanied by Domesticated Deer Movement Notification form or CVI. Live deer moving changing ownership in Kansas or moving into Kansas must have 2 forms of identification, with at least 1 being an official identification. Brucellosis For interstate and intrastate movement, cervids, except whitetail deer, mule deer, fallow deer and axis deer, 12 months of age or older must have a negative brucellosis within 30 days of movement or originate and move directly from a Brucellosis certified free herd. Tuberculosis - For intrastate movement must have a negative TB test within 90 days, or have originated and moved directly from a TB accredited free herd. Interstate movement must originate and move directly from a TB accredit free herd. Herd Certification or Accreditation numbers and last date of test must be included on the CVI. All CVIs must have a permit number issued by the KDAH office prior to entry.Must have permit from KDAH prior to movement into Kansas. Farm of destination in Kansas must have a valid domestic cervidae license or must move directly to a registered slaughter facility within Kansas. Movement to a preserve for hunting purposes does NOT apply as being moved direct to slaughter. Imports are restricted to those which have at least 5 years of CWD surveillance under a state complaint with the federal HCP program. Two forms of identification with at least one form being an official identification must be individually listed on the CVI.Kansas is a compliant state under the Federal HCP program. All participants in the Kansas CWD program are required to have all animals over 1 year of age officially identified, and 100% sampling .for any farm mortalities or animals sent to slaughter. Exceptions to this may only be made by the Animal Health Commissioner in the event of mass mortalities due to a disease event (such as EHD) where a diagnosis has been confirmed at an accredited laboratory, or a natural disaster in which a large number of animals are killed. All owners of whitetail and mule deer, moose, red deer or North American elk are required to have fences a minimum of 8 feet in height, and all fences must be maintained in such a way as to prevent escape into the wild or ingress of wild cervids into the captive herd. Records of all animals that were born or have moved into or out a herd must be recorded. A yearly herd inventory and reconciliation is to be conducted, with a visual verification of official identification being conducted at least every 3 years in all herds in the CWD program.
Participants in the CWD program may only receive animals from herds with an equal or higher CWD status or will drop to level of the animal with the lowest CWD status in the herd.
Participation in the CWD program is a voluntary. All CWD testing is conducted at the owners expense. Samples may be collected by the owner's or by individuals trained in sampling for CWD. Sample collections are to include both the obex and 1 medial retropharyngeal lymph node, and all animal identification is to be listed on the submission form.Have performed surveillance since 1997.NoNoNo ban at this time.Yes-one animal found as part of trace from an infected Colorado herd in 1997. The entire herd was depopulated and never restocked.Yes, white-tailed deer January 2006. Have seen almost yearly since that time.
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KentuckyYYDept. of Fish and Wildlife Resources (KDFWR) regulates the physical facilities for captive cervids. Kentucky Dept. of Agriculture (KDA) is in charge of the health certification of captive cervids, including the Cervid Chronic Wasting Disease Surveillance Identification (CCWDSI) program, & all transportation permits (importation and intrastate movement). Both agencies require ear tags.
Contact:
(KDFWR) elizabeth.danks@ky.gov (502) 564-
3400 x4584; (KDA) jason.wachter@ky.gov (502)
564-3956
Prohibition on importation of live cervids. Changes can be made to this rule at the discretion of the state veterinarian.Prohibition on importation of live cervids. Changes can be made to this rule at the discretion of the state veterinarian. Intrastate movement requires a transportation permit, CVI, and valid KDA and KDFWR captive cervid permits. Cervids may not be moved into a new facility until all wild deer are removed and a valid captive cervid permit has been obtained from both KDFWR and KDA.Yes; a draft CWD Response Plan has been adopted by KDA and KDFWR. KDFWR regulations are being revised with the goal of streamlining the regulations and the cervid permit application process between KDA and KDFWR, complying with the new USDA CWD rule, and resolving issues that have been identified with existing regulations.All cervid facilities must be enrolled with KDA's Cervid CWD Surveillance Identification Program and be enrolled in one of two monitoring programs. The Herd Certificiation Program (HCP) requires the CWD testing of all cervids ≥ 12 months of age that die, or any cervid displaying clinical signs of CWD. The Herd Management Program (HMP) requires the testing of cervids that are ≥12 months of age if they meet one of the three requirements: (1) The first 10 cervids that are harvested within the calander year, (2) any cervids displaying clinical signs of CWD, or (3) any cervids that die and are not officially identified (tagged, tattooed, etc.). There are four facilities which are exempt from these requirements: shooting preserves which encaptured wild deer within the confines of a fence prior to March 8, 2002 are exempt from all CWD monitoring and certification requirements. No live animals are allowed to be imported to or exported from these four facilities.Approximately 24,000 samples have been tested through hunter-harvested and targeted surveillance of free-ranging cervids since 2002. All samples have tested negative. Targeted survillance is ongoing and increasing. Beginning in 2012, the state surveillance program began 100% targeted surveillance, which reduced the number of samples tested, but increase the likelihood of each sample to detect CWD, if present.Baiting is allowed on private land (over 90% of Kentucky land).
Baiting is prohibited on all state- managed WMAs and on federally owned areas.
Cannot feed wildlife outside the curtilage of the home from March 1 - May 31.By regulation: Ban on importation of brain and spinal column of hunter harvested carcasses from CWD infected states. Hunters may import boned out meat, quarters and meat portions without spinal column or head attached, antlers, antlers attached to clean skull plate, clean skull, clean upper canines, hide, and finished taxidermy mounts.NoNo
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LouisianaYYDepartment of Agriculture & Forestry regulates cervids kept for commercial purposes. LA Dept of AG Animal Health (225) 925-3980. Department of Wildlife & Fisheries regulates white-tailed deer kept for non-commercial purposes. Contact: James M. LaCour DVM State Wildlife Veterinarian, Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (225) 765-0823 jmlacour@wlf.la.gov05/06/02: Wildlife & Fisheries Commission Declaration of Emergency: Banned importation of deer and elk into state, also restricted movements within state. Currently, LA Dept of Ag has a moratorium in place banning the importation of white- tailed deer, mule deer and elk. Ck with LA Dept of AG for specs. (225) 925-3980.05/06/02: Ban importation of deer and elk into state. Have placed a moratorium on the issuance of new game breeder licenses(LDWF). LA Dept of AG currently has a moratorium in place banning the importation of white-tailed deer, mule deer and elk. Ck with LA Dept of AG for specs. (225) 925-3980.Yes, LDAF is currently re-writing its laws governing captive cervids including some CWD information.LA Dept. of AG has developed regulations requiring any permitted game farm enrolled in their CWD Certification Program to submit samples from any animal that dies for any reason. Pens not enrolled in the CWD Certification Program are not required to test.To date 7896 samples from wild white-tailed deer have been tested by the Louisiana Department ofWildlife and Fisheries. All have been negative. Upon the loss of federal funding for CWD testing, LDWF will test only target animals: 1) road killed deer, 2) emaciated deer, 3) neurological deer, 4) exotic cervid species and 5) deer harvested adjacent to LA Dept. of AG -licensed import pens.No ban at this time.No ban at this time.No ban at this time.NoNo
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Maine*YYDepartment of Agriculture regulates cervids used for commercial purposes, Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife regulates all other imports. Contact: Lee Kantar, MDIFW, (207) 941-4477 lee.kantar@maine.govTo prevent the introduction of CWD into Maine and pursuant to 12 MRSA Part 12, Chapter 903, Subchapter 2 §10103, 2 & §10104.1, it is now illegal for hunters who travel to any other states & provinces (except for NH and the provinces of QC, NB and Newfoundland/Labrador) to hunt deer, elk, moose or caribou to transport any carcass parts that pose a risk of containing CWD prions. Hunters may return to Maine only with boned-out meat, hardened antlers (with or without skull caps), hides without the head, & finished taxidermy mounts. If still attached, skull caps should be cleaned free of brain and other tissues. It is legal for individuals to transport through the State of Maine cervid carcasses or parts destined for other states, provinces or countries.
Such transportation is to occurr without undue delay & using the most reasonably direct route through Maine to the final destination for the cervid carcass or parts & in a manner that is both leak-proof & that prevents their exposure to the environment.
The Maine Department of Agriculture has banned imports of live cervids from other states until a fail- safe importation system can be implemented.Captive/farmed deer are monitored for the presence of CWD using on-farm health monitoring practices, and by testing certain farmed deer for CWD at slaughter.
Captive/farmed cervids are currently sampled for CWD testing at two USDA inspected slaughter facilities. Over 1,000 slaughtered farm raised cervids since 2001.
Approximately 500-600 hunter-killed deer are tested annually for CWD. Sampling is focused in towns containing active cervid farms, and/or winter feeding operations. In 2014 5 399 deer and 3 moose were tested. All were negative.Deer baiting is illegalNo ban at this time. We are encouraging people to voluntarily phase out feeding as a disease prevention measure.Deer that are not harvested from a state or province adjacent to Maine are not allowed to be brought into Maine unless they meet the following: boned out meat, hardened antlers, skull caps claned of all tissues, capes and hides with no skull, teeth, and finished taxidermy mounts. Using outreach to discourage hunters from importing high-risk tissues from out-of-state hunts. Hunters also cautioned to use urine-based lures above the reach of deer and to handle them with caution.NoNo
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MarylandYYDepartment of Natural Resources and Department of Agriculture. Contact: Peter Jayne, DNR, (410) 827-8612, pjayne@dnr.state.md.usNo imports allowed except Accredited American Zoological Association facilities. No cervid farming for meat or hide. Captive owners must sterilize all their cervids or separate sexes to prevent reproduction (currently, approximately 150 animals). Exception - we now permit limited reproduction by fallow deer only, up to, but not exceeding, the number of fallow deer they are permitted to currently possess.Possession of cervids not permitted except for approximately 11 individuals grandfathered in.Due to positive deer discovered outside of the CWD Management Area the CWD Response Plan is activated and considerations are being made for changes to the CWD approach in Maryland. Updates will be posted periodically on the agency's website.No live animal testing planned; captive cervid owners required to test dead animals for CWD.As of 3/29/16 - 8,547 deer tested for CWD with 11 positive animals confirmed. Targeted surveillance has been conducted since 1999. Active surveillance statewide using hunter-harvested deer conducted 2002 – 2009. Starting in 2010, active surveillance will be conducted only within Allegany and Washington Counties near the West Virginia outbreak; statewide surveillance we be conducted periodically thereafter.Baiting is prohibited in the CWD Management Area of Allegany County, only.Feeding is prohibited in the CWD Management Area of Allegany County, only.Carcasses from areas where CWD has been reported must be processed prior to entering the state. No spinal cord tissues or brain tissues allowed from these areas. Cleaned skulls, hides, antlers, finished taxidermy mounts, boneless meat permitted. Recent regulations limit transport of animal parts from the MD county where CWD has been found.NoYes, eleven animals in Allegany County.
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MassachusettsYYDivision of Fisheries and Wildlife regulates importation and possession, the F&W Board creates and modifies regulations and policies regarding captive cervid imports. Contact: David Stainbrook, david.stainbrook@state.ma.us, 508-
389-6320.
Regulation prohibiting the importation of all live cervids. Previous regulations: No white-tailed deer or elk imports allowed, only farmed deer allowed are fallow, sika, and red deer.Regulation prohibiting the importation of all live cervids. Previous regulations: No white-tailed deer or elk imports allowed, only farmed deer allowed are fallow, sika, and red deer.NA - Implemented.Mandatory testing of all captive cervid mortalities, provided funding is available.Random testing of hunter-harvested deer and vehicle-killed moose and deer from 2002-2011 (4530 samples from white-tailed deer and 26 from moose to date with no positives). Federal funding ceased in 2012, thus sampling is limited to clinical suspect deer and moose.Baiting is prohibited (during and 10 days prior to the deer hunting season).No ban on feeding (when not related to hunting) at this time.08/1/05: Emergency regulation restricting the importation of cervid carcass parts from states diagnosed with CWD in either captive or wild herds. Regulation became permanent 9/2005. Exceptions to the restriction include: boned out meat, hides without heads attached, clean (no meat or tissue attached) skull or skull plates with antlers attached, clean upper canine teeth (buglers, whistlers, ivories), and finished taxidermy heads.NoNo
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MichiganNNExecutive order No. 2004-3, 4/15/04, transferred responsibility for regulations and biosecurity of captive cervid facilities from Department of Agriculture & Rural Development to Department of Natural Resources. A complete audit of the industry was conducted by MDNR summer and early fall of 2004. MDARD will oversee disease testing of captive cervids. MDNR: Steve Schmitt, 517-336-5030, schmitts@michigan.gov; MDARD:
James Averill, 800-292-3939, averillj1@michigan.gov
Importation of cervids reviewed on a case-by-case basis. Import requirements revised in 2014. Must originate from a CWD certified and TB accredited herd. Must be imported into CWD Certified herd and current herd owner must have participated in Herd Certification Program for at least 3 years. Exporting herd must not be within 25 miles of a CWD positive in a POC in past 5 years, 75 miles from a CWD positive in a free ranging within past 10 years if single fence, or in 50 miles from a CWD positive in a free ranging within past 10 years if double fence.
Fence requirements from exporting herds must meet MI POC standards (10'). Currently ban imports from Wisconsin, Colorado, and Wyoming. Exporting herd must not have imported animals from WI, CO, or WY in last 5 years. Individual animal to be imported will be traced to all herds resided in since birth.
Importation of cervids reviewed on a case-by- case basis. Imported animal must stay in herd for 2 years and then may only be moved to a new facility by permit. Imported animals meeting above criteria may only move to CWD certified herds.
Imported animals may be moved to a ranch facility after 5 years and must be moved by permit.
Yes, with the identification of a positive free-ranging white- tailed deer in 2015, the CWD Response plan was put into action. Due to addtional CWD positive deer found the
CWD Management Zone has been expanded to include 5 counties (Clinton, Eaton, Ingham, Ionia, and Shiawasse). The CWD Core Area within the Management Zone has been expanded to include 17 townships (Alaiedon, Bath, Delhi, Delta, Dewitt, Eagle, Lansing, Meridian, Olive, Oneida, Riley, Victor, Watertown, Westphalia, Wheatfield, Williamstown, Woodhull) . Surveillance will take place within these areas and movement of carcasses and parts from the Managment Zone will be restricted. Baiting and feeding are banned in these 5 counties. If additional positives are found the Management Zone and Core Area could be expanded further.
Mandatory CWD surveillance; all death losses due to illness in privately owned cervid (POC) herds over 12 months of age, and 25% of hunted/culled must be reported to Department of Agriculture & Rural Development and submitted for CWD testing. CWD is a reportable disease and if suspected, must be reported to MDARD immediately. To date, MDARD has tested over 20,335 POC's since 2002. Voluntary Herd Certification Program: must test all death losses greater than 12 months of age.As of 04/07/16, have tested 39,277white-tailed deer, 1,616 elk, and 71 moose. The first positive free-ranging white-tailed deer was found in May 2015. For 2016- 17, CWD surveillance will take place within the 5-county CWD Management Zone. There will be mandatory deer check in the 17-township CWD Core Are . Targeted surveillance will continue in the remainder of the state for deer, elk, and moose.Baiting banned in Alcona, Alpena, Clinton, Eaton, Ingham, Ionia Montmorency,Oscoda, and Shiawassee counties. Baiting is legal in the rest of the state.Supplemental feeding is prohibited in Michigan, except in counties along the Lake Superior shoreline and a feeding permit must be issued by the DNR. Supplemental feeding is defined as placing larger volumes of feed in locations where deer congregate may not begin prior to the Monday following January 1 and must end by May 15 unless otherwise specified in the feeding permit. Feed must be placed at least 1 mile from livestock, farmed fields, and orchards. Feed must consist solely of grains and pelletized food materials containing no animal protein and can not exceed a depth of 3 inches.
Recreational viewing feeding banned in Alcona, Alpena, Clinton, Eaton, Ingham, Ionia, Montmorencey, Oscoda, and Shiawasee counties. It is legal in the remaninder of the state as long as feed is placed at least 100 yards from a residence and the amount does not exceed 2 gallons.
Effective 07/12/03: Prohibit importation of any carcass or carcass parts of free- ranging deer or elk into Michigan if the carcass or parts originated from a state or province having CWD in their free-ranging deer or elk population, with the exception of: deboned meat, antlers, antlers attached to a skull cap cleaned of all brain and muscle tissue, hides cleaned of excess tissue or blood, upper canine teeth, finished taxidermy mount, and tissue imported for use by a diagnostic or research laboratory. Any person notified by another state or province that a deer or elk they brought into MI tested positive for CWD must contact the MDNR Wildlife Disease Lab (517-336-5030) within two business days and provide any information requested.
Effective May 2016, no movement of deer carcasses or parts with the exception of those mentioned above, out of the 17-township CWD Core Area unless going to a licensed taxidermist or processor within 72 hours of harvest.
Yes, one white-tailed deer in Kent County in 2008Yes. The first white- tailed deer in 2015. Currently at 7 positive WTD.
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MinnesotaNNMN Board of Animal Health regulates all captive deer, elk, and other cervids. Contact: Dr. Paul Anderson, paul.l.anderson@state.mn.usImported animal must have RFID. Must have ICVI with 14 days of importation.Captive cervids can only be possessed in herds registered with the MN Board of Animal Health. CWD surveillance is mandatory. Additionally, laws regulate fencing, escapes, animal transfers, importation, animal identification, and herd inventories. There have been 5 captive cervid farms with CWD in MN since 2002.Minnesota DNR finalized a CWD response plan, after finding its first case of CWD in a wild cervid in January 2011. New regulations that define a recreation feeding ban in a 4-county area, CWD Management Zone, and carcass movement restrictions within that zone were put into place in fall 2011. Since no new cases of CWD were detected in the wild, the feeding ban was lifted in February 2014. Also, the CWD Management Zone has been dissolved back to surrounding deer permit areas and no longer have any regulations to wild deer during the hunting seasons.Mandatory testing for all captive cervids.Nearly 46,000 hunter-harvested deer samples collected statewide since 2002. The first case of CWD in a free-ranging white-tailed deer was discovered in January 2011, from an adult doe harvested by a hunter in late November 2010. Minnesota DNR iniated its CWD Response Plan, which included an aerial survey and additional sampling of deer within 10 miles of the CWD positive deer, and the creation of a CWD Management Zone. Over 5,000 samples have been collected in this area since the first discovery of the disease in southeastern MN with no additional positive deer detected. Intensive surveillance efforts were discontinued in southeastern MN, following 3 consecutive years of not finding any new cases of CWD in wild deer. However, with a new case detected in a wild deer in northeast Iowa, CWD surveillance occured in SE MN along the Iowa border in fall 2014, with no detection of the disease. Surveillance also took place in fall 2014 in the north metro region, within 10 miles of a captive red deer farm found positive for CWD in 2012. There were no positive results from deer sampled in this north metro region. There were no surveillance efforts conducted by MNDNR during the deer seasons in fall 2015, howeverl continued targeted surveillance of sick animals throughout the state. CWD surveillance through hunter harvested deer will take place in southeast MN during fall 2016 firearms deer season due to infection of positive wild animals found along the border in both Wisconsin and Iowa.No baiting allowed.MN DNR obtained legal authority in 2003 to ban feeding of deer to control CWD. Howerver, DNR has drafted a rule to ban recreational feeding in a 4,000 square mile area in northwestern Minnesota in response to detection of bovine tuberculosis in cattle and wild deer; rule was effective by November 2006. Since CWD was discovered in southeastern MN in January 2011, a new recreational feeding ban went into effect in mid- Feb that encompassed 4 counties surrounding the CWD-positive deer. In the absence of new detection of either bovine TB or CWD, both rules expired in Febuary 2014.Ban on the importation of whole cervid carcasses into the state, from CWD endemic areas as determined by the MN Board of Animal Health. Only the following portions of hunter-harvested cervidae carcasses may be brought into the state from CWD endemic areas: cut and wrapped meat; quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached; antlers, hides, or teeth; finished taxidermy mounts; and antlers attached to skull caps that are cleaned of all brain tissue.YesYes
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Mississippi*YYMississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries & Parks (MDWFP) has jurisdiction over white-tailed deer, Department of Agriculture & the Board of Animal Health has jurisdiction over exotics. As of July 1, 2006, MDWFP has plenary power to regulate all commercial and noncommercial wild animal enclosures.Temporary moratorium on importation of elk, red deer, mule deer, black-tailed deer and other cervids designated as susceptible to chronic wasting disease; penalties; If any cervid in an enclosure tests positive for chronic wasting disease or if any cervids within the enclosure have been imported from an area diagnosed with chronic wasting disease, then all cervids in the enclosure shall be deemed a threat to native wildlife and to public health and may be killed and disposed of by the state; The owner of an enclosure shall comply with any testing of white- tailed deer harvested within the enclosure as may be required by the department. If chronic wasting disease is diagnosed within five (5) miles of the enclosure, the owner of such enclosure shall allow department personnel to enter the enclosure to utilize lethal collection methods to obtain tissue samples for testing. If chronic wasting disease is diagnosed within the enclosure, the owner shall allow department personnel to enter the enclosure and depopulate the white-tailed deer within the enclosure.In process of surveying number, location & size of all wild animal enclosures in the state & types of animals held or hunted in such enclosures; and of setting regulations for any facility that prevents the free ingress & egress of native or nonnative cervids. § 49-7-58.4. Regulation of commercial & noncommercial wild animal enclosures & facilities preventing free ingress & egress of native & nonnative cervids. (1)The Commission on Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks (WF&P) & the Dept. of Wildlife, Fisheries & Parks shall have plenary power to regulate all commercial & noncommercial wild animal enclosures in order to conserve & protect native wildlife for all citizens to enjoy & to protect our recreational economy dependent on native wildlife resources. (2)The Commission on WF&P shall regulate any facility that prevents the free ingress & egress of native or nonnative cervids as the same are defined by the commission. The commission may promulgate rules & regulations requiring the issuance of permits & the payment of a reasonable fee. Regulations promulgated under this authority must have a majority vote of the commission to be adopted.If captive cervids are transported among captive cervid facilities in MS, they must be in the enclosure CWD monitoring program.Annual health checks are performed on white-tailed deer on various private and public lands; MDWFP has conducted hunter harvested CWD surveilance since 2002: 2002-2003 = 1244 samples, 2003-2004 = 1584 samples, 2004-2005 =
934 samples, 2005-2006 = 937, 2006-2007 = 1089, 2007-2008 = 1215, 2008-
2009 = 1323, 2009-2010 = 950. 2010-2011 = 1182, 2011-2012 = ~250 . No
positives have been detected.
It is illegal to hunt or trap any wild animal or wild bird with the aid of bait.Public Notice W-3796 defines what type of feed may be used, at what times of the year feeds may be fed, and how the feed may be distributed. Additionally, the area that can be hunted while feeding has been defined.No ban.NoNo
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MissouriNN*
Banned in 2015, lawsuit overturned ban. Appeal likely but may take 2+years
Code of state regulations: Confined Wildlife:
http://www.sos.mo.gov/cmsimages/adrules/csr/current/3csr/3c10-9.pdf

Constitutional authority of the MO Conservation Commission:
http://www.moga.mo.gov/MoStatutes/ConstHTML/A04040a1.html
On March 1, 2010 the Missouri Department of Agriculture (MDA) assumed the role of regulating all cervid herds (elk, mule deer, and white-tailed deer) that are enrolled in the State's voluntary CWD monitoring program. Elk are considered "livestock" and therefore solely under the jurisdiction of MDA. The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) oversaw the permitting of captive cervid facilities. On January 30, 2015, MDC implemented new captive cervid regulations requiring mandatory enrollment in CWD Herd Certification Programs. *ABOVE REGULATIONS ARE CURRENTLY NOT ENFORCEABLE DUE
TO ONGOING LITIGATION* Contact Person for MDA is Dr. Linda Hickam, State Veterinarian, Linda.Hickam@mda.mo.gov, (573) 751-3377. Contact person for MDC is Dr. Kelly Straka, State Wildlife Veterinarian, Kelly.Straka@mdc.mo.gov, (573) 815-7901 ext. 3617
In addition to standard regulations, see the CWD regulations for captive cervids and wildlife.MDC implemented a number of regulation changes for captive cervids (white-tailed deer, mule-deer and their hybrids) effective January 30, 2015, including: a ban on the importation of live white-tailed deer, mule deer, and their hybrids; the adoption of new fencing standards (single 8’ fence with specifications for construction) for all existing and new facilities (to be in compliance within 18 months); mandatory CWD testing in all mortalities over six months of age for both breeders and big game hunting preserves; new record keeping requirements (5 year retention of all purchases and sales); a 5-year prohibition on the construction of new captive cervid facilities within 25 miles of any confirmed CWD-positive deer; a ban on the holding of white-tailed deer, mule-deer and their hybrids in temporary exhibit facilities. *ABOVE REGULATIONS ARE CURRENTLY NOT ENFORCEABLE DUE TO ONGOING LITIGATION*A newly approved regulation will be in place by fall of 2016 in 29 CWD Management Zone counties, requiring the mandatory submittal of all deer harvested opening weekend of firearms season for CWD testing.
Management Zones encompass an approximately 25 mile radius around CWD-positive detections. Additionally, current restrictions on the feeding/placement of consumables will be expanded to include all 29 Management Zone counties. Additional expansion of the removal of antler-point restrictions and an increase in antlerless permit availability from 1 to 2 is also being considered for fall of 2016 for all 29 Management Zone counties (these regulations are already in place in some Management Zone counties).
According to MDC's new regulations, all wildlife breeders and big game hunting preserves must participate in a USDA-approved chronic wasting disease herd certification program. Additionally, CWD testing is required for all mortalities over the age of 6-months. The rule allows permitees to apply for an exemption from testing requirements in the event of mass-casualty events; MDC reserves the right to collect samples during these events if so desired. In the event of a positive CWD test result, captive cervid producers must comply with a herd disease response plan approved by MDC.
*ABOVE REGULATIONS ARE CURRENTLY NOT ENFORCEABLE DUE TO ONGOING LITIGATION*
Since 2001, over 51,000 free-ranging deer have been tested for CWD in Missouri. Active statewide surveillance focuses on hunter-harvested male deer collected at taxidermists throughout the state, with approximately one-half of the state sampled every year. Opportunistic testing of sick and road-killed deer also occurs statewide. Sampling intensity is increased in "CWD Management Zones," currently including a total of 29 counties for the 2016 surveillance season. A new regulation requires mandatory submittal of deer harvested opening weekend in these 29 counties for CWD testing. Agency-directed targeted culling occurs in CWD "Core Areas" (localized areas where CWD is known to be established, including 1 square-mile sections where CWD has been detected as well as a 1-section buffer) from January to March.Hunting deer, turkey and waterfowl over bait has been prohibited for many years in Missouri.Grain, salt products, minerals and other consumable natural or manufactured products used to attract deer will be prohibited in 29 "CWD Management Zone" counties by the fall of 2016.As of March 1, 2010 the following verbiage has been added to the Wildlife Code of Missouri "Wildlife legally taken and exported from another state or country may also be shipped into Missouri by common carrier, except cervid carcasses or cervid carcass parts. The importation, transportation, or possession of cervid carcasses or cervid carcass parts taken from or obtained outside of Missouri is prohibited, except for meat that is cut and wrapped; meat that has been boned out; quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached; hides or capes from which all excess tissue has been removed; antlers; antlers attached to skull plates or skulls cleaned of all muscle and brain tissue; upper canine teeth; and finished taxidermy products. Carcasses or parts of carcasses with the spinal column or head attached my be transported into the state only if they are reported to an agent of the department within twenty-four
(24) hours of entering the state and then taken to a license meat processor or taxidermist within seventy-two (72) hours of entry. Licensed meat processors and taxidermists shall dispose of the discarded tissue in a properly permitted landfill.
Yes. In 2010 and 2011 CWD-positive captive white-tailed deer were detected in two (2) captive facilities in two counties in northcentral Missouri (in Linn and Macon counties). In total, eleven (11) CWD- positive deer were detected in these facilities. One of these facilities is a hunting preserve that remains in operation under new ownership in accordance with a herd plan developed by MDA/USDA/MDC.Yes. Two CWD-positive free-ranging deer were first detected in the state in 2012. As of March 2016 a total of thirty three (33) free- ranging white-tailed deer in five counties have tested positive for CWD in Missouri.
Twenty-one (21) cases were within 2 miles of the Macon Co. positive captive facility. CWD- positive deer have also been detected in Adair (9), Cole (1), Franklin
(1) and Linn (1) counties.
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MontanaNNFish, Wildlife & Parks has jurisdiction over licensing, reports, record keeping, exterior fencing, classification, unlawful capture, inspection, and enforcement of those activities. Department of Livestock has authority over marking, inspection, transport, importation, quarantine, hold orders, interior facilities, health, and enforcement of those activities. Contact: Wildlife - Jennifer Ramsey JRamsey@mt.gov; Captive - Michael Lee, milee@mt.gov,Certificate of veterinary innspection and prior import permit required. Must be importing to alternative livestock ranch licensed to receive that species; official ID tag; trace back capabilities; no red, axis, rusa, sambar, sika or roe deer imports; white-tailed deer must originate west of the 100th meridian and be certified free of meningeal worm parasites and dorsal spine larvae; elk must be free of red deer genes; cervidae must be TB and Brucellosis tested and certified Para TB free. Anthelmintic treatment required. Import fee charged to Montana importer. Not licensing new captive facilities; licensee may not charge a fee or remuneration for shooting of captive animals; no transfer of existing licenses allowed.No wild or captive imports from geographic area where CWD is endemic or has been diagnosed. Cervid must originate from a herd that has participated in an approved CWD surveillance program for at least 60 months prior to import; no cervidae have been added to exporting herd within last 60 months from a herd of lesser CWD status; if exporting state has any confirmed CWD, must have completed an epidemiological investigation and identified all CWD affected, exposed, or trace herds.The 2014 Decision Notice on Chronic Wasting Disease Management Plan for Free Ranging Wildlife In Montana deviates from the original management plans goal of elimination of CWD by herd depopulation, and instead calls for use of an adaptive management approach to guide future decisions and managment.Game Farm Regulation 32.4.1301, Sub- Chapter 13: Requires annual whole herd inspection, ID verification and inventory, must report all animal deaths within 1 working day of discovery and request inspection with CWD samples submitted for testing; test eligible age is 16 months and older; have tested approximately 5,400 animals.Have done state wide sampling since 1998, testing over 17,200 cervids (deer, elk, and moose) including targeted samples from animals exhibiting clinical symptoms. All have tested negative. The 2014 Decision Notice on Chronic Wasting Disease Management Plan for Free Ranging wildlife in Montana indicates that MFWP will test symptomatic animals and direct remaining funds to testing animals in one high risk area annually. If CWD is detected, surveillance will be focused in the hunting district where it was detected and adjacent hunting districts. In winter 2014-15, in addition to testing of symptomatic animals, 25 mule deer were captured in a high risk area. Rectal biopsies were tested for CWD and radio collars were applied to monitor potential movement of deer into neighboring areas where CWD is known to exist. To date, CWD has not been detected in free ranging wildlife.No baiting allowed.Feeding of game animals is prohibited. Legislation passed in 2009 providing for increased penalties for feeding of ungulates.In February of 2006, the Montana FWP Commission passed a prohibition on the importation of heads and spinal cords from deer, elk, and moose harvested in states or provinces that have experienced CWD in their wildlife populations or in captive cervid populations in those states or provinces. Transport of processed meat, deboned meat, quarters, hides, antlers and/or skull caps without any nervous tissue attached, finished taxidermy heads, and ivories are not affected by the prohibition.Yes - one captive elk herd was diagnosed as CWD positive in 1999. That herd of eighty-seven elk was depopulated with 9 animals diagnosed as CWD positive. A trace forward herd consisting of 29 elk was also depopulated with no CWD positive animals detected.No
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Nebraska*NNDepartment of Agriculture. Contact: Dr. Dennis Hughes, State Veterinarian, Nebraska Dept. of Agriculture, dennis.hughes@nebraska.govTransport prohibited if exposed, infected, or suspected to have an infectious, contagious or transmissible disease; identification number required; cannot be moved through more than one concentration point in 90 days. Cervids cannot be moved out of endemic counties into non-endemic counties or out of state.CVI for elk or mule deer must verify: 1) the herd of origin has had no diagnosis or epidemiological evidence of CWD for the past 5 years; or 2) The herd has been enrolled 5 or more years in a state approved CWD herd monitoring program and current status has been recorded on CVI.NAAll captive cervids 16 months or older that die from illness, slaughter, hunting or any other cause shall be reported within 24 hours and submitted for CWD testing.Since 1997 have checked over 46,169 hunter harvested deer and over 465 hunter harvested elk. Have tested 1,333 agency harvested deer and animals exhibiting clinical signs. Have confirmed 284 positive free-roaming deer and 2 positive free- roaming elk.Illegal to hunt within 200 yards of an area that has been baited in the last 60 days. Baiting is legal, but hunting over bait is not legal.Not banned at this time, but it is illegal to hunt over food.NAYesYes
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Nevada*??Nevada Department of Wildlife. Contact: Dr. Peregrine Wolff, (775) 353-3753, pwolff@ndow.org. The Nevada Department of Agriculture state veterinarian has regulatory authority over captive cervids. Contact: Dr.
Michael T. Greenlee, State Veterinarian, Nevada Department of Agriculture; michael.greenlee@agri.state.nv.us
2005 legislation removed elk from the alternative livestock list so elk cannot be ranched as a captive cervid. No captive elk, white-tailed deer, or mule deer ranches exist in Nevada.No captive cervid ranches exist in the state. This was allowed until July 2005.Surveillance and testing have been conducted since 1998. To date, 2481 mule deer and 569 elk have been tested for CWD across the entire state, and all were negative. Current focus on targeted surveillance animals in the Eastern 1/3 of the state (on UT border). This includes hunter harvest, animals demonstarting clinical signs consistent with CWD and roadkilled animals.NANANANoNo
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New HampshireNNNH Fish & Game Department. Contact: Dan Bergeron, (603) 271-2461, Daniel.Bergeron@wildlife.nh.gov.
NH Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food, Contact: Dr. Steven Crawford, State Veterinarian, (603) 271-2404, scrawford@agr.state.nh.us
Dept. of Ag. requires certificate of veterinary innspection and import permit. Certificate shall certify that cervids are individually identified with permanent metal ear tag, legible tattoo or microchip, that all individuals on premises have been inspected, that cervids have never been exposed to animals confirmed to have CWD or animals exposed to confirmed CWD animals. Fish and Game prohibits the importation of native cervid species (white-tailed deer and moose).Dept. of Ag. requires that cervids can only be imported into herds participating in NH or federal CWD monitoring program at a level consistent with 5 years participation. Herds of origin must meet at least the same standard. Once imported, individual cervids may never be transferred to another herd within New Hampshire.In light of New York's testing of over 7,300 deer in their CWD Containment Area over a 5-year period with no additional positives, and their decision to officially decommission the containment area in 2010, New Hampshire exempted New York from its list of CWD postive jurisdictions to again allow carcass importation from New York beginnig in 2012. New Hampshire hunters are being warned that at present, transport of NY deer into or though MA and VT remains illegal.Voluntary CWD testing and certification program through state Dept. of AgricultureStatewide monitoring & surveillance of hunter killed wild deer began in 2002. Objective is to test a minimum of 400 samples annually plus targeted surveillance. In 2015, 350 deer were tested. From 2002 through 2015, a total of 5,549 hunter killed deer have been tested statewide. None have tested positive to date.No ban at this time.No ban, encouraging people not to feed deer.Rules prohibit the importation of hunter-killed cervid carcasses or parts of cervid carcasses from CWD positive jurisdictions except for: de-boned meat, antlers, antlers attached to skull caps from which all soft tissue has been removed, upper canine teeth, hides or capes with no part of the head attached, finished taxidermy mounts, and tissue prepared and packaged for use by diagnostic or research laboratories. CWD positive jurisdictions are defined as states or provinces in which CWD has been found in wild or captive cervids. Beginning in 2012, New York has been exempted from New Hampshire's list of CWD postive jurisdictions.NoNo
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New Jersey*YYDivision of Fish and Wildlife has possession permitting authority. Contact: Bill Stansley, bill.stansley@earthlink.net, (908) 236-2118. The NJ Department of Agriculture, State Veterinarian has condemnation authority and authority over health certification requirements for imports.
Contact: Dr. Manoel Tamassia, Manoel.tamassia@ag.state.nj.us, 609-671-6400. The USDA-VS Area Veterinarian-in-Charge has authority to enforce federal importation regulations. Contact: Dr. Michael Kornreich, (609) 259-5260.
Ban on the importation of white-tailed deer, black- tailed deer, mule deer, red deer, sika deer, reindeer, elk and mooseBan on the importation of white-tailed deer, black- tailed deer, mule deer, red deer, sika deer, reindeer, elk and mooseReports of unexplained deaths with preservation of specimens for CWD testing required for captive cervids. To date, 130 captive deer, 6 captive elk and 2 captive raindeer were tested for CWD, and all were negative. Voluntary CWD Certification Program is being developed and will require testing of all captive cervids enrolled in the CWD Certification Program that die from illness, slaughter, hunting or any other cause.Surveillance includes testing of hunter-killed and symptomatic wild deer. Surveillance began in 1997 and has been conducted annually since 2002. From 1997 to 2013, 5,621 wild deer have been tested for CWD, and all were negative.No ban.No ban, discourage supplemental feeding.NANoNo
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New MexicoNNNew Mexico Department of Game and Fish, Contact for special permits: Monique White, Law Enforcement Division, (505) 476-8064; Contact for Wildlife health issues: Kerry Mower, (505) 476- 8080, kerry.mower@state.nm.usNew Mexico allows importation of cervids from facilities certified through USDA approved herd certification program. Source herds must be located in an area free of CWD. Permit to import cervids requires $500 application fee, 2 forms of approved identification, health certificate, Tuberculosis and Brucellosis testing. Movements of cervids within New Mexico requires advance written notice.Enrollment in Herd Certification Program is voluntary. Any CWD event in a game park will result in mandatory quarantine and surveillance for that facility. CWD management actions and herd plan will be determined collaboratively among owners, Department of Game and Fish, New Mexico Livestock Board, and USDA APHIS.No new regulations are presently in development. The regulations for game park operation and for importation into game parks were recently revised to reflect requirements of the Herd Certification Program.New Mexico Department of Game and Fish administers the Herd Certification Program. Testing for herds not enrolled in the Herd Certification Program is voluntary. Testing is required for herds enrolled in the Herd Certification Program. Testing costs are borne by owners.Surveillance includes statewide random tissue collection from hunter-killed elk and deer combined with targeted collection from high-risk areas and from suspect animals. GMU's 19 and 28 require hunters to submit tissues for testing. All hunters who submit valid tissue samples are eligible for premier hunt opportunities awarded through lottery. All reports of sick and abnormal animals are investigated by New Mexico Department of Game and Fish; all abnormal deer and elk are collected and tested.per Subsection I of 19.31.10 NMAC Hunting and Fishing - Manner and Method of Taking, Use of Baits or Scents: It shall be unlawful for anyone to take or attempt to take any protected species by use of baits or scents as defined in Subsection P of
19.31.7 NMAC. Scent masking agents on one's person are allowed. (This regulation is in reference to animals in the wild and not in Class "A" Game Parks). Per Subsection D. of 19.03.2 NMAC Depredation Assistance Causing a Nuisance Game Animal Problem: It shall be unlawful for any person, by intention or through negligence, to cause a nuisance game animal problem by baiting, or otherwise enticing game animals to an area, and such persons, if convicted, may be punished under 17-2-10 NMSA 1978.
Per Subsection D. of 19.03.2 NMAC Depredation Assistance Causing a Nuisance Game Animal Problem: It shall be unlawful for any person, by intention or through negligence, to cause a nuisance game animal problem by baiting, or otherwise enticing game animals to an area, and such persons, if convicted, may be punished under 17-2-10 NMSA 1978.Only boned meat, cleaned and decontaminated skull caps, hides, and ivories can be removed from any designated area where CWD has been confirmed. Carcasses must be discarded in the field or incinerated.None.Yes, deer in Organ Mtns, Sacramento Mtns, McGregor Range, and a single case from San Andres Mtns. Elk from Sacramento Mtns.
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New YorkNNNYS Department of Agriculture and Markets (NYSDAM) regulates deer and elk held under wire. Contact cervidfarm@agriculture.ny.gov,
(518) 457-3502. NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) issues licenses to possess captive-bred white-tailed deer. Contact Joseph Therrien, [joseph.therrien@dec.ny.gov], (518) 402-8985. For Wild deer - NYS DEC Patrick Martin [patrick.martin@dec.ny.gov] ,(518) 402-9001. BE ADVISED THAT NYSDEC WILL BE AMENDING THEIR CWD REGULATIONS IN 2016 TO PROHIBIT CERTAIN ACTIVITIES THAT POSE A HIGH RISK OF INTRODUCING CWD INTO NEW YORK.
Adequate fencing and storage for CWD and TB samples is required. All deer and elk herds must be tuberculosis tested every 5 years or be on a slaughter surveillance program for TB. DEC requires a person to obtain a license from NYS DEC to possess captive-bred white-tailed deer. DEC collaborates with NYSDAM on all aspects of disease management involving cervids. BE ADVISED THAT NYSDEC WILL BE AMENDING THEIR CWD REGULATIONS IN 2016 TO PROHIBIT CERTAIN ACTIVITIES THAT POSE A HIGH RISK OF INTRODUCING CWD INTO NEW YORK.White-tailed-deer, elk, red deer, sika deer and other CWD susceptible species must either be on the CWD Certified Herd Certification Program (HCP) or else be on the CWD monitoring program. Herds on CWD HCP must have adequate handling and restraint facilities.
NYSDEC's CWD regulation is 6 NYCRR Part
189. This regulation prohibits the feeding of wild deer and wild moose and lists requirements for importing hunter-killed deer, elk and moose into NY. See text of DEC CWD regulation at www.dec.ny.gov/regs/3926.html. BE ADVISED THAT NYSDEC WILL BE AMENDING THEIR CWD REGULATIONS IN 2016 TO PROHIBIT CERTAIN ACTIVITIES THAT POSE A HIGH RISK OF INTRODUCING CWD INTO NEW YORK.
The NYSDAM prohibition on the importation of CWD susceptible animals will be reviewed in 2018. NYSDEC will be amending their CWD Regulation (Part 189) in 2015 to prohibit certain activities that pose a high risk of introducing CWD into New York.New York State DAM currently pays for all required testing. HCP herds must test all natural and harvest mortalities. The monitoring program for herds not selling live animals consists of reporting and sampling all natural deaths and having a total annual number of samples equal to 10% of the adult population. DEC requires that all people who have been issued a license from the DEC to possess captive bred white-tailed deer comply with NYSDAM provisions for CWD testing. BE ADVISED THAT NYSDEC WILL BE AMENDING THEIR CWD REGULATIONS IN 2016 TO PROHIBIT CERTAIN ACTIVITIES THAT POSE A HIGH RISK OF INTRODUCING CWD INTO NEW YORK.DEC began a statewide CWD surveillance program for wild white-tailed deer in 2002. CWD surveillance has continued in each successive year. CWD surveillance will continue each year for the foreseeable future. The NYS DEC's CWD Surveillance in 2015-16 will again target high risk activities and high risk animals. BE ADVISED THAT NYSDEC WILL BE AMENDING THEIR CWD REGULATIONS IN 2016 TO PROHIBIT CERTAIN ACTIVITIES THAT POSE A HIGH RISK OF INTRODUCING CWD INTO NEW YORK.Baiting of wild white-tailed deer has always been prohibited in New York State. See text of NYSDEC CWD regulation at www.dec.ny.gov/regs/3926.html. BE ADVISED THAT NYSDEC
WILL BE AMENDING THEIR CWD REGULATIONS IN 2016 TO PROHIBIT CERTAIN
ACTIVITIES THAT POSE A HIGH RISK OF INTRODUCING CWD INTO NEW YORK.
DEC has prohibited the feeding of wild white- tailed deer since July 2002. Individuals are allowed to plant food crops for wild deer and to feed wild deer for scientific research, wildlife damage abatement, and wildlife population reduction but only under a license from the NYSDEC. See full text of NYS DEC's CWD regs at www.dec.ny.gov/regs/3926.html. BE ADVISED THAT NYSDEC WILL BE AMENDING THEIR CWD REGULATIONS IN 2016 TO PROHIBIT CERTAIN ACTIVITIES THAT POSE A HIGH RISK OF INTRODUCING CWD INTO NEW YORK.NYSDEC's CWD Regulation, 6 NYCRR Part 189 prohibits the importation of specific parts from captive or captive bred cervids and wild cervids and moose coming from outside New York. See full text of CWD regulation for details at www.dec.ny.gov/regs/3926.html. BE ADVISED THAT NYSDEC WILL BE AMENDING THEIR CWD REGULATIONS IN 2016 TO PROHIBIT CERTAIN ACTIVITIES THAT POSE A HIGH RISK OF INTRODUCING CWD INTO NEW YORK.Yes. Confirmed in captive white-tailed deer in March/April 2005. No new cases have been found in captive herds since April 2005 and CWD surveillance continues on all cervid farms pursuant to the NYSDAM
CWD regulation.
Yes. Confirmed in wild white-tailed deer in April 2005. No new cases have been found in wild white-tailed deer in New York since April 2005. NYSDEC continues to do CWD surveillance during the hunting season and tests all deer exhibiting clinical symptoms.
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North CarolinaNNOn September 30, 2015, regulatory authority transferred from the NC Wildlife Resources Commission (NCWRC) to the NC Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services (NCDA&CS). NCDA&CS holds authority over the possession and transportation of farmed Cervidae in North Carolina andrequires a farmed cervid license for the possession of cervids and transportation permits for their movement (importation, exportation, intrastate transportation, emergency vet, and slaughterhouse permits), regulates minimum facility standards, CWD testing, cervid tagging, record-keeping, enforces those rules through conducting annual inspections of all cervid facilities in the state, assists with facility inspections, regulates the production of meat from fallow deer and elk, and holds premises quarantine authority through the State Veterinarian. NCWRC holds authority over the transportation of untagged cervids in North Carolina. Contact Dr. Michael Neault, NCDA&CS (919) 707-3272, Mike.Neault@ncagr.gov or
Daron Barnes, NCWRC, (919) 707-0062,
Daron.Barnes@ncwildlife.org.
Deer, elk, or other species in the family Cervidae may only be imported into the state of North Carolina from a herd in which Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) has not been detected for at least five years and has been managed using standards equivalent to, or more stringent than, the criteria specified in NC rule. Individual U.S. or Mexican state or territory, Sovereign Tribal Nation, Canadian province or other country of origin must have CWD monitoring requirements that are at least as stringent as those described in this Rule. There shall be no importation from individual U.S. or Mexican states or territories, Canadian provinces or other countries in which
CWD has been detected, either in a wild herd or a captive herd. Cervids imported into North Carolina shall be individually identified by tags provided by the NCDA&CS that shall be affixed by the licensee to each cervid as set forth in NC rule. Can locate importation rule text on-line in the North Carolina Administrative Code by searching for the following citation: 15A NCAC 10B.0101. Administrative code is currently being reviewed and drafted by NCDA&CS.
Rule amendments related to cervid tagging, CWD testing, record-keeping, facility maintenance, facility inspections, cervid escape,
enclosure requirements, and herd sanitation and care. Temporary Rule effective May 17, 2002, amended October 4, 2002, became permanent
August 2004, amended December 1, 2005. Can locate captivity rules in the North Carolina Administrative Code on-line by searching for the following citation: 15A NCAC 10H.0300.
Administrative code is currently being reviewed and drafted by NCDA&CS.
NCWRC passed several rules in response to CWD being documented east of the Mississippi River in 2002. Those rules are included in the rules found on-line and referenced previously and are currently in effect. Several recent amendments to the captivity rules [15A NCAC 10H.0300], including clarification on no hunting within captive facilities, addition of on-site slaughter permits, and clarification on licensing (one individual, ≥18 years old) now effective.
Rules in place that establish a state herd certification program for captive cervid facilities. Administrative code is currently being reviewed and drafted by NCDA&CS.
Testing of all captive cervids ≥ 12 months of age that die for any reason and testing of all captive cervids displaying symptoms characteristic of the disease required. Licensees are required to submit cervid heads or carcasses to NCDA&CS diagnostic lab for sample collection. Samples sent by NCDA&CS to National Veterinary Services Lab in Ames, IO for CWD evaluation. CWD has not been detected in any of the samples.All animals that are exhibiting symptoms characteristic of CWD are tested. Statewide surveillance with an objective of collecting a minimum of 1,000 samples was conducted in 2003 and 2008, and will continue to occur every five years. As of October 03, 2012, a total of 3,339 white-tailed deer and elk have been tested (165 clinical, 3,013 scheduled surveillance, 109 herd health checks, 16 depredation permits, 36 incidental samples).No ban at this time.No ban at this time.Ban on importation, transportation, or possession of cervid carcasses or carcass parts from any state or province where CWD occurs, except: meat that is cut and wrapped, quarters of other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached, meat that has been boned out, caped hides, clean skull plates, antlers, cleaned teeth, and finished taxidermy products. All products above must be properly labeled according to rule. Rule [15A NCAC 10B.0124] became effective May 1, 2006.NoNo
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North Dakota*NNState Board of Animal Health; Contact Dr. Beth Carlson, bwcarlson@nd.gov (701)328-2654. North Dakota Game & Fish: Contact Dr. Dan Grove, dmgrove@nd.gov, (701) 202-0775Facilities must be approved prior to ownership of deer and elk, and deer owners must obtain a non- traditional livestock license. Captive cervids must meet standards of risk assessment. Must be free of all contagious and infectious disease. Genetic testing (for purity) required for elk in ND zones 1 & 2. Animals must not be infected with or exposed to Johne's disease. Must be negative to two official brucellosis tests, one being the CF. Whole herd TB test within 12 months. In lieu of testing, Brucellosis- free and TB-free herd status is recognized. Annual inventory reports required for all cervids. Deer must be individually identified with USDA silver tag by 12 months of age, and elk by 24 months of age.
Additional restricitons apply to reindeer, red deer, and red deer/elk hybrids.
For importation: Must complete CWD 5-Year Risk Assessment Questionnaire (or have 5 year status) and fax to Board of Animal Health prior to entry permit issuance; cervids and originating herds must have no history of emaciation, depression, excessive salivation or thirst, or neurological disease. If symptoms arise, diagnostic measures must be taken to rule out a TSE.Board of Animal Health has mandatory inventory (since 1993). CWD testing is mandatory (since 1998) for farmed elk, white- tailed deer and mule deer over 12 months of age that die for any reason. As of November 1, 2013, over 9900 farmed deer and elk have been tested, with no evidence of CWD.ND Game & Fish Department has conducted Targeted Surveillance of free- ranging cervids since 1996. Hunter-harvested deer and elk surveillance began in 2002. As of October 15, 2012, >22,000 whitetail and mule deerr, >500 elk, and
>150 moose have been tested. Also tested have been a handful of pronghorn, bighorn sheep, and fallow deer. Three positive cases have been found; one each in 2009, 2010, and 2011. All three animals were harvested in Sioux County.
Deer Hunting Units 3E1, 3E2, 3F1, 3F2, 3CBanned in State Wildlife Management Areas and Federal Lands.08/27/03: Ban on importation of whole carcasses and carcass parts of white- tailed deer, mule deer and elk from areas within states or provinces with documented occurrences of CWD in wild populations and private game farms. Hunters may import the following parts: meat that is cut and wrapped (commercially or privately), quarters or other portions of meat with no part of spinal column or head attached, boned out meat, hides without heads attached, clean (no meat or tissue attached) skull plates with antlers attached, antlers with no meat or tissue attached, upper canine teeth (buglers, whistlers, or ivories), and finished taxidermy heads.NoYes
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OhioNNDepartment of Natural Resources, Division of Wildlife - Issues permits for white-tailed deer in captivity and carcass regulations. Contact: Ron Ollis, ron.ollis@dnr.state.oh.us. Department of Agriculture for import requirements and permits. Contact Cindy Bodie, bodie@agri.ohio.govBrucellosis within 30 days prior to entry or certified brucellosis free herd status. Negative whole herd tuberculosis test within 12 months prior to movement and negative individual tuberculosis test within 90 days prior to entry or accredited herd status. Must be free of symptoms of CWD. No importations from quarantine premises or area.CWD monitored herd status for 5 years. Documentation will be required prior to issuing permit. No importation from quarantined premises or area. Fence heights on capitve facility may be no less than 92 inches in height.
Reporting of escapees mandatory and it is illegal to release a captive cervid into the wild.
Recent changes to OAC will give the Chief of the Division of Wildlife the authority to establish a disease surveillance area (DSA) within which there will be a ban on baiting and feeding, as well as restrictions on moving high-risk carcass parts out of the DSA. We currently have rules that would cover the movement of said parts from hunter-harvested animals. Finding CWD in the wild or in a captive facility doesn't automatically mean a DSA will be established. The Chief will review each situation and decide if a DSA is warranted.Agreement form must be completed. Participating herds require testing on all captive cervids over 12 months of age which die, perimeter fencing to prevent ingress/egress of cervids, annual herd inventory by state or federal personnel or approved accredited veterinarian, herd additions allowed from herd of equal or greater status, official ID on all animals 12 months of age and older and animals leaving the premises under 12 months of age. ALL captive white-tail deer are required to be licensed by ODA and are required to test all animals 12 months of age and older for CWD.Target surveillance on free ranging white-tailed deer for CWD began in 2002 and is performed annually. In 2014-15, 837 samples were collected from road-killed deer in 58 counties (October to May). Suspect (~12) free-ranging deer are also collected and tested throughout the year. Additionally, 128 samples from mature bucks collected from taxidermists were tested and all results were fail to detect.No ban at this time, but see new CWD regulationsNo ban at this time, but see new CWD regulationsOhio Administrative Code 1501:31-19-02 makes it illegal for individuals to bring into Ohio deer, elk, and moose carcasses from certain portions of other states or provinces where chronic wasting disease has been identified unless all the soft tissue, lymph nodes and spinal column have been removed.Yes.No
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OklahomaNNFarmed Cervidae and Cervid Imports: Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry (Contact: Dr. Justin Roach, 405-522- 6128 or justin.roach@ag.ok.gov).
Native Cervidae and Hunting Facilities: Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation (Contact: Erik Bartholomew, erik.bartholomew@odwc.ok.gov)
Tuberculosis testing requirements must meet one of the following for all animals over six months of age: tested negative to 2 official tuberculosis tests conducted no less than 90 days apart with the 2nd test conducted within 90 days prior to entry, originate from a Qualified Herd and tested negative to an official Tuberculosis test within 90 days prior to entry, or originate from an Accredited Free Herd.
Brucellosis requirements must meet one of the following for all animals over six months of age: tested negative for brucellosis within 30 days prior to entry, or originate from a Brucellosis Certified Herd.
Restricts import of cervids from all counties and provinces where CWD has been identified in free- ranging cervid populations. All other cervid imports require the source herd to be certified in a federally approved CWD herd certification program.Developing joing CWD response plan between Oklahoma Departments of Agriculture and Wildlife. Also have proposed changes to administrative rules that would eliminate brucellosis import testing on non-elk species.Mandatory testing of off all deaths 12 months of age or old from herds participating in the CWD herd certification program.Since 1999 through 2010 10,681 white tailed deer, mule deer, and elk have been tested in wild poopulations, with no positive finding.No ban at this time.No ban at this time.No ban at this time.Yes, in a captive elk herd. The herd in question was depopulated September 2002 with no additional cases reported in captive or free ranging deer or elk.No
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OregonYYOregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (primary jursdiction) Dr. Colin Gillin, State Wildlife Veterinarian, colin.m.gillin@state.or.us (541-757-5232) or Ron Anglin,
ronald.e.anglin@state.or.us (503-947-6312) or Oregon Department of Agriculture (import, reportable animal disease, quarantine jurisdiction) State Veterinarian, Dr. Brad Leamaster, Bradley.R.Leamaster@state.or.us (503-986-4680)
Since June 2009, captive cervid producers may enroll in a Voluntary CWD Monitored Herd program via application to the Wildlife Division Administrator. As a condition for monitored herd status, all captive North American deer and elk 6 months of age or older and dying of any cause, must be sampled for CWD by a federally accredited veterinarian, or an ODFW or federal veterinarian or at a veterinary diagnostic laboratory by a veterinary pathologist.
Submissions must be sent to NVSL by the accredited veterinarian or pathologist.See next section for Chronic Wasting Disease Regulations for Captive Cervids and Wildlife .
11/08/02: The Oregon Fish & Wildlife Commission (Commission) issued a regulation imposing a permanent ban on the importation of live cervids (except fallow deer or reindeer originating from Oregon and used for educational or display purposes). This regulation was adopted as a risk reduction measure involving the potential import of CWD and transmission of the disease to the state's cervid populations (wild and farmed). June 2009 - Mandatory mortality reporting and CWD testing of all North American captive cervids 6 months of age or older and dying of any cause (Oregon Administrative Rule 635-049-0065.)No new regulations presently in developmentMandatory CWD testing is required of all captive cervids dying of any cause 6 months of age or older. Herds not enrolled in the Voluntary CWD Monitored Herd program may have CWD samples collected and submitted by anyone of the producers choosing, which may or may not include a federally accredited veterinarian. All CWD sampling results are sent by NVSL, the accredited veterinarian, or the producer to the Wildlife Health Lab for entry and tracking into a Captive Cervid Database.Since 2002-03, a total of 18,018 hunter-harvested and targeted surveillance deer and elk have been tested statewide. To date, 3,144 black-tailed deer, 6,400 mule deer, 348 white-tailed deer, 3,670 Roosevelt elk and 4,456 Rocky Mtn elk have been tested. All 18,018 samples tested were negative for CWD.No ban at this time.No ban at this time.Cervid carcass parts containing central nervous system tissue from animals killed in states/ provinces with a documented case of CWD are banned. Parts allowed for import from CWD endemic areas are: 1) Meat cut and wrapped commercially or privately; 2) Meat that has been boned out; 3) Quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached; 4) Hides and/or capes with no head attached; 5) Skull plates with antlers attached that have been cleaned of all meat and brain tissue (velvet antlers are allowed); 6) Antlers with no tissue attached (velvet antlers are allowed); 7) Upper canine teeth (buglers, whistlers, ivories); 8) Finished taxidermy headsNoNo
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PennsylvaniaNNPennsylvania Department of Agriculture contact Dr. David Zellner, dzellner@pa.gov; or Mary Martin 717-783-5309, marymartin@pa.gov, PA Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Animal Health, Rm 412, 2301 N Cameron St., Harrisburg, PA 17110.Additional requirements: 5) If from a state that had Vesicular Stomatitis in the last 12 months, a statement must be included, "All animals identified on this certificate of veterinary inspection have been examined and found to be free from VS. During the past 90 days, these animals were not located within 10 miles of a site where VS has been diagnosed.”CWD susceptible cervids must be from a CWD Herd Certification program participant at the Certified level. Movement is permitted from endemic areas and states.Last regulations were published in April 2014.PDA: A two tiered CWD surveillance program that includes the voluntary federal herd certification program or a mandatory monitoring program. This has been in place since March 2007.Have conducted targeted surveillance since 1998. Began testing all hunter-killed elk and a sample of hunter-killed deer in 2002. Pennsylvania Game Commission has increased targeted surveillance in three disease managment areas (DMA). All hunter-killed elk over 1 year, and a portion of the hunter-killed deer will be tested again in the coming year as well as escaped captives and clinical suspects. Also, a large number of road-kill deer are tested within the DMAs.State law for baiting and regulations have been created to allow its use to assist in urban deer removal on a limited basis in SE Pennsylvania. State law currently allows the feeding of deer, but it is unlawful to take advantage of or make use of a feeding (baited) area while hunting.Feeding of elk banned since 1995. Statewide feeding of deer has not yet been banned. but PGC is promoting this action. However, as called for in the CWD Response Plan our Executive Director has been given the necessary authority to enact emergency regulations, including a ban of feeding of deer. Feeding is now prohibited in the DMAs.High risk parts from hunter-killed animals have been banned from states with CWD in wild or farmed cervids. Details are available on the PGC website. High risk parts from wild cervids may not be removed from the DMAs in Pennsylvania.YesYes
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Rhode Island*NNDepartment of Environmental Management, Division of Fish & WildlifeContact: Brian Tefft brian.tefft@dem.ri.gov7/15/05 regulation: Prohibit importation of all captive and wild cervids from CWD endemic areas, & captives from a CWD free status herd (5+ years) herd (replaces previous moratorium). Additional regulations: Must originate from a federally accredited TB free herd; negative anaplasmosis/blue- tongue test (within 30 days of import) still apply.7/15/05: regulation: Prohibit importation of all captive and wild cervids from CWD endemic areas, & captives from a CWD free status herd (5+ years) herd (replaces previous moratorium). (Previous regulations: Require proof that there is no current or past history of contact with or exposure to any potential CWD animals or states affected by CWD.)NATest all captive cervids over 16 months that die (including slaughter), require perimeter fencing preventing ingress/egress of cervids, annual herd inventory, designation of herd status, must report herd additions.Have conducted stratified random and targeted surveillance since 2002. Current target is for the collection of 190 random samples as well as any suspect deer. To date we have tested 2020 deer all which tested negetive. We have focused on hunter killed deer (approximately 160 annually) and random collections (road kills approximately 30 annually) to develop our sample.Baiting currently prohibited.No person shall feed cervids at anytime unless part of a bona fide research, bona fide agricultural practices, wildlife food plots, brush cutting or bird feeding from elevated feeders within 100 feet of dwelling.Permanent regulations 7/14/05: No person shall import or posses brain, eyes, spinal cord, lymph nodes, tonsils or spleen of any cervid from a CWD endemic area or from a captive herd.NoNo
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South CarolinaYYDepartment of Natural Resources has ultimate control over importation and possession of captive cervids. Clemson University Livestock and Poultry Health also provides permit if and only if the DNR has previously permitted importation of the cervid. Contact: Charles Ruth, SCDNR, ruthc@dnr.sc.govOther than an occasional permit for temporary exhibition (e.g. reindeer at Christmas shows) and one dated permit for a small number of privately held fallow deer, importation of cervids has not been permitted (SC Code Section 50-16-20). As of May 2002, no more permits for temporary exhibition.Importation of cervids has never been permitted.NANA1998-2001 participated in CWD surveillance with SCWDS (targeted surveillance). In addition to targeted surveillance during 2002-2004 conducted active surveillance on approximately 500 hunter killed deer annually. In 2005 conducted targeted surveillance only. In 2006 active surveillance reinstated and continued thru 2012. With loss of federal funding only targeted surveillance since. Total deer tested over all years approximately 6,000.Hunting over bait was historically prohibited in 18 of 46 SC counties. By legislative action in 2013 hunting over bait is not prohibited statewide.No. However, in June 2003 a comprehensive wildlife disease control law (SC Code 50-11-
105) was passed. This law provides broad emergency powers to SCDNR and the agency believes this would include a ban on both baiting and feeding should a serious disease issue arise.
08/15/03: Emergency regulation restricting the importation of deer and elk carcass parts from states diagnosed with CWD. Regulation became permanent 4/2004. Exceptions to the restriction include: quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached, boned out meat, hides without heads attached, clean (no meat or tissue attached) skull or skull plates with antlers attached, antlers (detached from skull plate), clean upper canine teeth (buglers, whistlers, ivories), and finished taxidermy heads.NoNo
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South Dakota*NNAnimal Industry Board. Contact: Dr. Dustin Oedekoven, dustin.oedekoven@state.sd.usNegative TB test within 60 days prior to import, Negative brucellosis, anaplasmosis and bluetongue tests (within 30 days of import), individual official identification number and an additional form of individual identification, must complete Deer/Elk Herd Demographics and Risk Assessment questionnaire. Visit www.state.sd.us/aib for a copy of the questionnaire and importation requirements for all animals.Must originate from a herd in which all cervidae have been kept for at least three years or into which they were born. No exposure to or additions from any other source in the past three years. No diagnosis, signs or epidemiological evidence of CWD in this herd for the past three years. Will be allowed if originating from a herd with at least three years of CWD monitoring as determined by the Animal Health Official of South Dakota. There must be 100% CWD monitoring of all deaths, regardless of cause, of all animals 12 months of age and older. Documentation must also state that no animal in the herd has ever originated from, or ever been a member of a herd where CWD has been diagnosed, or have been a member of a CWD trace-back or trace- forward herd by an epidemiological investigation.No new regulations are being discussed.Monitor occurrence and distribution of CWD, captive cervid farms are required to keep inventory and report any additions, disappearances or illnesses which may be submitted for diagnosis. Participation in the Herd Certification Program (HCP) is voluntary as of April, 2012. In the voluntary HCP, CWD testing is required for all captive cervids 12 months of age or older which die of any cause.From 1997 to July 2015, 25,299 free-ranging cervids (6,060 Elk, 13,205 WTD, 6032 MD) have been tested for CWD. The first hunter-harvested CWD-positive was identified in 2001. Target/sick cervid surveillance in Wind Cave National Park has revealed 77 positive animals (67 Elk, 2 WTD, 8 MD). To date, 282 animals have been CWD-positive (104 Elk, 103 WTD, 75 MD) with all located in the Black Hills area (SW SD). Surveillance for CWD in free-ranging cervids in other areas of SD continues to indicate a lack of this disease.Hunters may not use salt blocks or licks or bait station to attract big game. "Bait station" is a place where edible foodstuffs or minerals are placed or maintained as an attractant to game animals. Use of scent alone does not constitute a bait station.No ban at this time.No ban at this time.YesYes
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TennesseeNNDepartment of Agriculture. Contact: Dr. Jill Johnson, e-mail: Dr.Jill.Johnson@tn.gov or Sara Clariday, email Sara.Clariday@tn.govNo cervids from geographic areas where CWD diagnosed; CVI must state importing cervid originates from herd in CWD surveillance program since Jan. 1, 2000. All cervids require an imporation certificate.10/28/2002: Department of Agriculture Rule: Ban importation of cervids from geographic areas where CWD diagnosed; risk assessment based on proximity of cervid to positive CWD geographic areas; CVI must state importing cervid originates from herd in CWD surveillance program since Jan. 1, 2000, no herd ever diagnosed with CWD, nor identified as a CWD trace-back or trace-forward herd.Tennesse does recognize certified status of a herd (5 completed years or level D) and has submitted rule changes for the approval process to reflect this , which will replace the current regulation of herd recognition since "Jan 1, 2000..." as stated under the current CWD Regulations for Captive Cervids and Wildlife. A bill to permit farming of white-tailed deer was withdrawn from legislative consideration in 2012. It is no legal to possess live white-tailed deer in TN.Surveillance performed on a voluntary basis, except mandatory for those facilities in or working toward certification. Mandatory testing on CWD susceptible cervids held and harvested on wildlife preserves. Wildlife preserves may only obtain CWD susceptible cervids from monitored herds.Testing done on all animals displaying symptoms of CWD. Approximately 7,500 hunter killed samples tested since 2002. Beginning 2007, surveillance will focus on targeted animals (diseased, road-killed, emaciated hunter-killed).No baiting allowed.No ban at this time.Carcasses from areas where CWD has been reported must be processed prior to entering the state. No spinal cord tissues or brain tissues allowed from these areas. Cleaned skulls, hides, antlers, etc are permitted.NoNo
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Texas*EElk N
Deer Y
Texas Animal Health Commission Contact: Dr. Andy Schwartz, andys@tahc.state.tx.us
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Contact: Ryan Schoeneberg; 979-942-0474 ryan.schoeneberg@tpwd.texas.gov
TAHC: Elk imported from other states must be enrolled in an official CWD monitoring program for at least 3 years, imports from states with CWD must be enrolled in an official monitoring program for at least 5 years (2002). TPWD: Prohibit the importation of WTD and MD from out-of-state captive cervid sources (2005). For intrastate movement must be issued a Triple T permit (Trap, Transport and Transplant) which requires that applicants test 10% of the WT/MD deer to be trapped and that 10-40
WT/MD deer must test "not detected" for CWD before a permit will be issued (2002). Once a trap site tests 60 WT/MD deer with "not detected" results, then testing requirements for that site are reduced to 3 % of the WT/MD deer to be transplanted (2005). TAHC &/or TPWD: All captive WT deer, mule deer and elk must have a permanently tattooed identification number, official USDA or RFID tag (starting 1 Jan 06).
TAHC: Elk imported from other states must be enrolled in an official CWD monitoring program for at least 3 years, imports from states with CWD must be enrolled in an official monitoring program for at least 5 years (2002). TPWD: Prohibit the importation of WTD and MD from out-of-state captive cervid sources (2005). For intrastate movement must be issued a Triple T permit (Trap, Transport and Transplant) which requires that applicants test 10% of the WT/MD deer to be trapped and that 10-40 WT/MD deer must test "not detected" for CWD before a permit will be issued (2002). Once a trap site tests 60 WT/MD deer with "not detected" results, then testing requirements for that site are reduced to 3 % of the WT/MD deer to be transplanted (2005).
TAHC &/or TPWD: All captive WT deer, mule deer and elk must have a permanently tattooed identification number, official USDA or RFID tag (starting 1 Jan 06).
TPWD and TAHC: In light of the discovery of CWD in 2012 in West Texas a Containment Zone, High Risk Zone and a Buffer Zone have been established. There are regulations that include increased movement restrictions, and mandatory and voluntary check stations.TAHC: Voluntary status monitoring program since 1999. Participating herds required to submit annual inventories and submission of samples from all cases of mortality in animals over 16 months of age. TPWD: Mandatory herd monitoring for CWD, with TPWD, on captive WT/MD herds in order to be movement qualified. Effective April 1, 2007: In order for a breeder facility to move deer, the permittee must have "Movement Qualified" status (2006). A facility is Movement Qualified if: (1) certified by TAHC as having a CWD monitored Herd Status of Level A or higher, (2) less than 5 eligible deer mortalities have occurred in facility since 4/1/06,
(3) no CWD test result of "detected" returned from lab, (4) CWD test results of "not detected" returned from the lab on a minimum of 20% of all eligible deer mortalities occurring in the facility as of 4/1/06. If a movement qualified facility receives deer from a facility that does not have movement qualified status, the receiving facility loses movement qualified status for a period of one year.
Established protocols for testing to detect CWD at 1% prevalence with 95% confidence. From July 2002 through August 2012, Texas has tested over 36,000 samples with nearly 8,000 of those being submitted by the Captive Cervid industry. The majority are collected by Field Biologists on hunter harvest, road kill, and clinically sick animals. In light of the CWD Positive animals being detected during 2012 in West Texas in 6 wild MD there is an increased effort of testing to detect geographic extent and prevalence.No ban at this time.02/02/04: Prohibit the feeding of wildlife in state parks.No ban at this time.NoYes (2012 in 6 Mule Deer in West Texas, Hudspeth and El Paso Counties)
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UtahNNUtah Division of Wildlife Resources: Contact Annette Roug aroug@utah.gov Utah Department of Agriculture and Food, Animal Industry Division has jurisdiction over captive elk facilities. Contact Cody James, codyjames@utah.govCVI must state that cervid is not infected with Johne's, CWD or malignant catarrhal fever and may have never been east of the 100 degree meridian. Must have all internal and external parasites treated.Must originate from state or province that requires all suspected/confirmed cases of CWD to be reported, state must have the authority to quarantine. Elk must originate from states with implemented program for surveillance, control and eradication of CWD in domestic elk. No elk from herd, trace-back herd or adjacent herd diagnosed with CWD or elk exposed to or positive for CWD allowed for import.NAMandatory cervid farm testing, must report any suspect or finding of CWD and must submit any elk over 16 months of age that dies for any reason for testing, captive hunting facilities must submit samples from 100% of all elk that are killed, slaughtered or destroyed.Have been testing wild cervids for CWD since 1998. We have designed surveillance systems that incorporate hunter harvest, targeted surveillance of symptomatic or suspect animals and vehicle kill samples. All sampling plans are designed to detect CWD if it occurs in 1% of the population with 95% confidence limits.NANA09/17/02: Ban on importation of hunter harvested animal parts from areas where CWD has been found. May import meat that is cut and wrapped, meat with no part of the head or spinal column attached, boned out meat, hides with no heads attached, skull plates with antlers attached and free of meat and tissue, upper canine teeth and finished taxidermy heads.YesYes
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Vermont*NNDepartment of Agriculture, Food & Markets is responsible for captive cervid importation, health certificate, facility standards. Contact state veterinarian Kristen Haas 802-828-2421.
Vermont Fish and Wildlife has jurisdiction over captive hunting facilities with the potential of only two such facilities in the state.
Red deer (elk), fallow deer, and reindeer are classified as domestic and governed by Agency of Agriculture. White-tailed deer and moose are native wild species and are not permitted to be held captive or privately owned. (Previous regulations: Also test negative for anaplasmosis/blue tongue and vesicular stomatitis exposure. Reindeer and red deer must be free of nematodes of subfamily Elaplostrangylinaee at the time of importation). Importation restricted from CWD-positive states and provinces.Mandatory post-mortum CWD test of all captive red deer. Hunter-killed deer from CWD positive states and provinces must enter Vermont in 'boned' condition.NoCaptive cervid facilities required to perform CWD testing.In 2002 began testing hunter harvested cervids and performing targeted surveillance. Have collected over 2400 samples from hunter harvest and target animal surveillance through 2009 with no positives being detected to date. In 2010 switch to targeted surveillance occured. Annual samples ~8Deer baiting restriction was put into effect in 2005. Food may not be placed at the disposal of wildlife during any open deer season (a total of 50 days).A deer feeding restriction was plut into effect In 2005. Bird feeding may continue as long as deer do not have access to the food. Incidental uptake of food by deer during livestock feeding is accepted. Food plots and agricultural spillage are not considered feeding.08/21/02: It is illegal to import or posses deer or elk, or parts of deer or elk from Canadian provinces and states that have had CWD or from captive cervid facilities except for: meat that is cut up, packaged and labeled with hunting license information and not mixed with other deer or elk during processing, meat that is boneless, hides or capes with no parts of the heads attached, clean skull- cap with antlers attached, antlers with no other meat or tissue attached, finished taxidermy heads, upper canine teeth with no tissue attached.NoNo
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Virginia??Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries (VDGIF) has the jurisdiction over captive cervids. Contact VDGIF (804) 837-5666, Megan Kirchgessner, megan.kirchgessner@dgif.virginia.gov or (540)
569-0023, Nelson Lafon, nelson.lafon@dgif.virginia.gov. If captive cervids are imported into VA, and this is currently only allowed in rare circumstances by Department regulation (see column C), then a VA Dept. of Ag and Consumer Services (VDACS) health certificate is required.
Ban on importation of cervids into VA and prohibition of the intrastate movement of cervids unless specifically allowed by the VDGIF as of 2002. As of April 1, 2008, exotic cervids may be moved within VA between permitted exhibitors on case-by-case basis pending negative TB/brucellosis tests and compliance with mandatory CWD testing requirements. As of August 1, 2012, exotic cervids may be imported, following TB/brucellosis testing, into VA on a case-by-case basis to a permitted exhibitor who is the sole possessor of a cervid species. Deer to be moved must be from an AZA accredited facility in a state without pertinent diseases, such as TB, brucellosis, or CWD, in wild or captive deer. Transfer of embryos/semen will follow the same criteria as live deer movements. Deer farming is no longer permitted in Virginia. Cervids may only be held in captivity with a valid VDGIF permit (e.g., exhibiitors, T&E, etc.).In 2002, developed permit conditions for cervids in captivity including annual inspections, mandatory tagging, mandatory CWD testing of all adult mortalities, record keeping, etc. Prohibited rehabilitation and release of deer that originate from within the Containment Area (designated as part of CWD response) Prohibited the statewide rehabilitation of elk and adult deer. See other columns for additional management actions in and near the CWD Containment Area.Yes; effective 2015, the possession and use of cervid excretions and bodily fluids (e.g., urine) for the purpose of taking, attempting to take, attracting, or scouting any wild animal in VA is prohibited. Also, the CWD Containment Area is being expanded from parts of Frederick and Shenandoah counties, to all of Clarke, Frederick, Shenandoah, and Warren counties, which will expand existing regulations over a much larger area.Requires VDGIF notification and mandatory CWD testing of all adult deaths in all captive deer facilities.Active surveillance of road or hunter-killed deer statewide during 2002, 2007, and 2011, as well as year-round statewide targeted surveillance of CWD clinical suspects since 2002. Regional active surveillance in areas near the West Virginia outbreak since 2005. Approximately 9500 samples have been collected since 2002, and CWD has been detected in 13 deer (4 does and 9 bucks) during the last 7 hunting seasons. Twelve positives have been detected in Frederick County and one positive was detected in Shenandoah County in 2015. During 2016, active surveillance will be focused intensively within the Containment Area, which has been expanded following the 2014 positives (see column E). Mandatory
CWD sampling of hunter killed deer on certain dates within the CA along with enhanced road-kill surveillance.
May not bait for the purpose of taking an animal.Effective April 2010, feeding of deer is prohibited year round in Frederick, Shenandoah, Clarke, and Warren counties, and the City of Winchester as part of CWD response. Additionally, it is also illegal year round to feed deer or elk in Buchanan, Dickenson, or Wise counties as part of elk restoration. Elsewhere in the state, there is a ban on feeding deer on national forest lands and department-owned lands. Ban on feeding deer statewide during the period September 1 thru the first Saturday in January, effective 2006. It is also illegal to feed cervids during any deer hunting season in any city, town, or county in the state that allows deer/elk hunting; and any area is considered "baited" for 10 days after the removal of feed.From other states: Eff. 07/01/11: No person shall import or possess any carcass or part of a carcass of any member of the family Cervidae (deer) originating from an enclosure intended to confine deer or elk, or from any area designated by the Department as a carcass-restriction zone (please see http://www.dgif.virginia.gov/wildlife/diseases/cwd/ for specifics regarding carcass-restriction zones) except for the following carcass parts that may be imported and possessed: boned-out meat that is cut & wrapped, quarters or other portions of meat w/ no part of the spinal column or skull attached, hides or capes with no skull attached, clean (no meat or tissue attached) antlers or skulls/skull plates w/wo antlers attached, upper canine teeth (buglers, whistlers or ivories), & finished taxidermy products. From Containment Area (CA): Prohibit transport of any deer carcass or deer part that originates within the CA out of the CA, except those parts currently allowed under the carcass importation regulation noted above Require meat processors, taxidermists, road-kill pickup crews, and waste management service contractors to dispose of all deer wastes from the CA in a lined landfill located in the CA Promote/encourage disposal of all unused portions of hunter-killed and permit-killed deer carcasses from the CA in a lined landfill located in the CA or in dumpsters provided by VDGIF.NoYes
50
Washington??The Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW) regulates the importation and possession of captive cervids. Both WDFW and the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) regulate the disease testing requirements for captive cervids. WDFW contact: Dr. Kristin Mansfield, kristin.mansfield@dfw.wa.gov; WSDA contact: Dr. Joe Baker jbaker@dfw.wa.gov.Captive cervid farms, except formally permitted fallow deer and reindeer farms, were prohibited in 1993. In addition to standard regulations, cervids must be tested for certain Parelaphostrongylus and Elaphostrongylus species before entering the state.NANAWDFW has conducted targeted surveillance sampling since 1995 from wild cervids exhibiting clinical signs compatible with CWD. Intensive hunter-harvested deer surveillance was performed between 2000 and 2012. As of September 2012, over 6500 deer, elk and moose were tested with no evidence of CWD detected.No ban, baiting is legal.Public feeding is discouraged, but not banned. Some feeding is done by the state to prevent agriculture depredation.It is unlawful to import most cervid parts from states where CWD has been found in wild animals. As of October 2014, this includes:
Alberta, Canada; Saskatchewan, Canada; Colorado; Illinois; Iowa, Kansas; Maryland; Michigan, Minnesota; Missouri; Nebraska; New Mexico; New York; North Dakota; Pennsylvania; South Dakota; Texas; Utah; Virginia; West Virginia; Wisconsin; and Wyoming.
Exceptions include: meat that has been deboned in the state/province where it was harvested, with the bones being prohibited from importation; tissue-free skulls, antlers and upper canine teeth; hides or capes without heads attached; tissue imported for use by a diagnostic or research lab; and finished taxidermy mounts. If an importer or recipient of a deer or elk is notified by the originating state or province that the animal tested positive for CWD, the WDFW must be notified within 24 hours.
NoNo
51
West VirginiaNNWV Department of Agriculture is responsible for captive cervid species . Contact: Vanessa Harper DVM, vharper@wvda.us, (304) 538-2397Cervid must originate from TB Accredited herd; must complete application for importation; may not originate from any state diagnosed with TB.The DOA prohibits the importation of any cervid from a county or adjoining county diagnosed with CWD and allows importation from only states with approved USDA APHIS CWD Herd Certification Programs that meet the WV DOA CWD Herd Certification Program standards.NoWV DOA surveillance program is mandatory and requires testing of all mortality of captive cervids >12 months old.WV DNR conducts statewide surveillance using a stratified sample of road kills initiated in 2002 and continues at present. For sampling the statewide surveillance/monitoring populations consist of 3 areas (i.e. CWD Containment/Management Area , 4 counties adjacent to Hampshire, Hardy, and Morgan counties and the remainder of the state comprised of 48 counties).
Monitoring within the CWD Containment/Management Area consists primarily of samples from hunter harvested deer. Surveillance outside this area is primarily quota driven samples from road kill deer.
Baiting ban in Berkeley, Grant, Hampshire, Hardy, Jefferson, Mineral, and Morgan counties. It is illegal to bait or feed any wildlife on public land statewide between September 1 and December 31 and during spring gobbler season. Baiting is discouraged but not banned on private land in remaining 48 counties.Deer feeding banned in Berkeley, Grant, Hampshire, Hardy, Jefferson, Mineral, and Morgan counties (except song and insectivorous birds may be fed, provided that such feeding shall not cause, or be done in a manner that would be reasonably anticipated to cause, a congregation of cervids or other wildlife). It is illegal to feed any wildlife on public land statewide between September 1 and December 31 and during spring gobbler season. Feeding is discouraged but not restricted in remaining 48 counties.Importation of cervid carcasses and carcass parts from a state or province or a disignated CWD Containment or Disease Management Area which has diagnosed chronic wasting disease or from captive cervid facilities in any state or province is prohibited, except the meat from which all bones have been removed, the cape, the antlers or antlers and skull plate from which all meat or tissue has been removed, cervid canines, and finished taxidermy heads may be imported. Hunters in West Virginia are prohibited from transporting dead cervids or their parts beyond the boundary of the CWD Containment Area which includes all of Hampshire, Hardy, and Morgan counties except for the folowing: meat that has been boned out, quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached, cleaned hide with no head attached, clean skull plate with antleres attched, antlers with no meat or tissue attached, and finished taxidermy mounts.NoYes
52
WisconsinNNDepartment of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection regulates importation of all cervids and registers farmed cervids. Contact at DATCP Dr. Amy Horn-Delzer, Amy.HornDelzer@wisconsin.gov (608) 224-4886Current CVI and import permit is required. Contact (608) 224-4886 or visit http://datcp.wi.gov/Animals/Animal_Movement/Deer_ Elk/index.aspx for detailed information.1) Imports only from herd with 5 years of CWD monitoring status under a state/federally approved CWD certification program , 2) Movement intrastate only from herds enrolled in state monitoring program, must have 5 years of monitoring status, 3) Mandatory testing on all dead/harvested farm-raised deer 12 months or over for herds enrolled in CWD Herd Status Program, 4) Owners must report escapes within 24 hours, 5) Owners must report signs of CWD within 24 hours to a veterinarian, 6) Hunting Preserves must be certified to have at least 80 acres within the fenced area and no contact with bovines, 7) All deer being imported and those moving intrastate must have 2 ID's, one being official and the other being either official or unique to the herd. All deer going into a hunting preserve (not naturally born there) must have 2 IDs -- one visible ear tag and one implanted chip.Oct 1, 2014 - 1) Cervids 12 months old or older must be tested for CWD 2) Enrolled owners are now required to file a final census report if they un-enroll, or if they go out of business. 3) Escape reports must now include a date of return, date of kill, circumstances of the escape, and what future action will be done to prevent more escapes. 4) Enrolled herds must maintain 100% CWD testing of test- eligible animals - even if going to slaughter or preserve. Un- enrolled herd testing has been reduced to 25% at slaughter and 50% at preserve hunts. 5) Deer may now move to a preserve with one individual TB test, if the owner herd has had a whole herd test in the past (previously took 2 individual TB tests to move to a preserve).Enrolled herds must meet all Federal HCP requirements as of Dec 10, 2012. Mandatory 100 % testing of all deaths over 12 months of age that die for any reason. Herds enrolled in the CWD monitoring program must have 2 forms of ID (one being official and the other can either be official or unique to the individual in the herd) in each deer by 12 months of age. Every 3 years a physical inventory completed by the herd veterinarian needs to be submitted. Un- enrolled herds must test all deer that are killed intentionally or die in the farm, 50% of deer that are hunted on a preserve, and 25% of deer sent to slaughter.There is no charge to hunters for testing their deer, but testing is not available in all parts of the state every year. Over 193,000 wild deer have been tested statewide since 1999, with over 3,000 testing positive, all but 12 of which were found in the Southern Farmland Zone in the southern part of the State. From April 1, 2015 to March 31, 2016, Wisconsin sampled 3,117 deer, with 295 of those testing postive.Baiting regulation is under the direction of Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. See http://dnr.wi.gov/files/pdf/pubs/wm/ wm0456.pdf for a complete outline of baiting regulations. Legislation is in place that prohibits baiting of deer in any county that has a
CWD or bovine tuberculosis positive captive or wild animal that has been confirmed after 12/31/1997. The baiting ban occurs in the county where the positive is confirmed, and any counties within a 10 mile radius of a confirmed positive. This has resulted in the prohibition being in place in 41 of Wisconsin's 72 counties. Where baiting is not prohibited, it is restricited such that individulal hunters may place only 2 gallons of bait per 40 acres of land and no bait site may be within 100 yards of another established bait site.
Cervid feeding regulation is under the direction of Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. See http://dnr.wi.gov/files/pdf/pubs/wm/wm0456.pd f for a complete outline of feeding regulations. Legislation is in place that prohibits feeding of deer in any county that has a CWD or bovine tuberculosis positive captive or wild animal that has been confirmed after 12/31/1997. The feeding ban occurs in the county where the positive is confirmed, and any counties within a 10 mile radius of a confirmed positive. This has resulted in the prohibition being in place in 41 of Wisconsin's 72 counties. Where feeding is not prohibited, it is restrcited such that individual hunters may place only 2 gallons of bait per 40 acres of land and no bait site may be within 100 yards of another established bait site.Carcass movement reguation is under the direction of Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. See http://dnr.wi.gov/topic/wildlifehabitat/carcassmovement.html for a complete outline of carcass movement restrictions. The movement of both whole wild- deer carcasses and certain parts of those carcasses from a CWD-affected county (a county with either a wild or captive animal that has been confirmed to be positive for CWD in the county or portion of the county is within a 10-mile radius of a wild or captive animal that has been confirmed to be positive for
CWD) is restricted. Carcasses can only be moved within these counties and the adjacent counties. However, hunters are allowed to take whole cervid carcasses or any parts of carcasses harvested in the CWD-affected counties or in any state or province where CWD has been found, into any part of Wisconsin, provided the carcass (or nonexempt parts) are taken to a licensed taxidermist or meat processor within 72 hours of registering a Wisconsin deer, or within 72 hours of entering Wisconsin from another state. Only the following parts of wild cervids are exempt from these regulations:
• Meat that is cut and wrapped (either commercially or privately)
• Quarters or other portions of meat to which no part of the spinal column is attached
• Meat that has been deboned
• Hides with no heads attached
• Finished taxidermy heads
• Antlers with no tissue attached
• Clean skull plates with no lymphoid or brain tissue attached
• Clean skulls with no lymphoid or brain tissue attached
• Upper canine teeth (also known as buglers, whistlers, or ivories)
CWD has been diagnosed in 14 Wisconsin cervid
farms. The first was confirmed in 2002, the latest in 2016.
Yes - 3,131 positive free-ranging white-tailed deer have been identified in Wisconsin since 2001. Of the 72
counties, 18 currently have CWD detected in the wild deer herd.
53
Wyoming*YY
(exception)
Game & Fish Commission Contact: Eric Keszler, eric.keszler@wyo.gov, (307) 777-4594Cervid ranching not allowed; one elk ranch given exemption.No imports of cervids unless they come from monitored herds free of CWD for at least 5 years.Captive cervids are not allowed; single exemption allowed; single exempted ranch not in CWD endemic area and has opted not to import any cervid.Continual statewide targeted animal survey; statewide hunter-harvested surveillance in deer and elk since 2003.The department may issue baiting permits to landowners for specific sites on private land where conditions exist which are limiting the ability to take big game animals for the purpose of addressing damage to private property, human safety, disease issues, or population management.No ban at this time.4/13/11: Importation into Wyoming of any deer, elk, or moose taken from any state, province, or country within areas designated as positive for CWD is restricted—such animal carcasses may only be transported into Wyoming to a private residence for processing, to a taxidermist, to a processor, or to a CWD sample collection site in Wyoming provided the head and all portions of the spinal column are disposed of in an approved landfill. Within Wyoming, transport of deer, elk, or moose taken or possessed from any hunt area in
Wyoming to another hunt area within Wyoming or any other state, province or country is restricted—such animal carcasses may only be transported in
Wyoming to a camp, a private residence for processing, to a taxidermist, to a processor, or to a CWD sample collection site in Wyoming provided the head and all portions of the spinal column remain at the site of the kill or are disposed of in any approved landfill in Wyoming.
NoYes
54
Canadian
Provinces
11
55
AlbertaNNAgriculture and Rural Development Contact: hernan.ortegon@gov.ab.caProvincial regulations allow the raising of elk, white- tailed deer, mule deer and moose. Cervid farming is closely regulated. Farmers require an annual permit. Animals must have official identification. A provincial database records all animal inventories and movements that are reported by the farmers and audited by the province.
Import protocols are in place to decrease the risk of importing cervids that carry CWD or other diseases of concern for the province.
Alberta Mandatory CWD Surveillance Program in captive cervids since 2002. Also, mandatory submission of hunter-killed deer heads in designated CWD surveillance areas.The Alberta Mandatory CWD Program, in place since 2002. It was reviewed and updated in 2011. The principles of the program remain unchanged.Mandatory surveillance on all deaths of captive cervids over 1 year of age including slaughter from August 2002 to present. Before that time, voluntary surveillance was conducted on captive cervids between October of 1996 and August of 2002.Ongoing surveillance on wild cervids since fall 1996 - primarily hunter-kills plus clinical cases and road kills. The first positive wild deer was found in September 2005; the first positive hunter-kill was shot in December 2005. The Fish and
Wildlife Division uses increased fall hunting opportunities in designated CWD risk areas to monitor occurrence and spread of CWD. Mandatory submission of deer heads is required in designated high risk areas. To get an update on CWD on wild cervids, please visit: http://aep.alberta.ca/fish-wildlife/wildlife-diseases/chronic- wasting-disease/cwd-updates/default.aspx
No baiting of cervids allowed.In 2008 the Fish and Willdlife Division initiated voluntary carcass handling and transportation guidelines in CWD risk areas and in conjunction with carcasses coming to Alberta from CWD risk areas outside the province.One elk and one WTD in 2002. One WTD in 2003
discovered in the depopulation of the affected WTD herd. Three elk tested positive in 2015. The entire herd was depopulated
Several species affected: mule deer, white-tailed deer, and a moose. Details available at http://aep.alberta.ca/fish wildlife/wildlife- diseases/chronic- wasting- disease/default.aspx
56
British
Columbia*
YYFederal and provinical government contacts for captive cervids: Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and the Animal Industry Branch:
M. A. Wetzstein DVM, Manager, Livestock Health, Management & Regulation, Food Safety & Quality Branch, BC Ministry of Agriculture and Lands, e-mail: merv.wetzstein@gov.bc.ca, Ph 604-556-3013.
No game farming of native cervids in BC: fallow deer and reindeer only; inter-provincial animal movements are controlled by CFIA and all conditions set out under the Cervidae Movement Permit policy must be met prior to a permit being authorized. Intra- provincial animal movements are controlled by the Ministry of Agriculture and Lands.Prohibition of live cervid imports since 1980's. BC Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations (FLNRO) has jurisdiction over free ranging cervids. The Fish and Wildlife Branch has developed a new Wildlife Act regulation that restricts the import of cervid parts harvested outside of BC (Effective Fall 2011).The CWD Surveillance and Early Response Plan has been approved. FLNRO is leading a Provincial Technical
Working Group and two regional working groups comprised of relevant government agencies and stakeholders for Plan input and delivery of the CWD program.
All CWD testing of captive cervids is voluntary.Sampling of wild cervids began in 2001, with voluntary sampling of hunter submissions and road killed deer and elk in regions closest to east and south borders. Over 2700 animals have been tested to date, with no positives. Sampling efforts will continue to focus on areas considered to be at higher risk, particularly along Alberta/BC border.Review and consultation underway- not common practice to bait in BC, currently no ban. Recommended that the use of scents and attractants be restricted to
synthetic products:
Review and consultation underway- not common practice to supplemental feed in BC, currently no ban. Recommended that supplemental feeding of cervids is prohibited except during emergency situations, at the discretion of regional managers in consultation with FLNRO headquarters.The following carcass preparations are now legislated prior to bringing meat or animal parts into BC after hunting wild or captive cervids in jurisdictions in Canada and the US:
• Removal of the head, hide, hooves, mammary glands, all internal organs and spinal column at the kill site, and leaving these parts in the place of origin - with the only exception being the head if it is submitted for CWD testing as soon as possible in the jurisdiction of origin.
• Deboning or commercial preparation of meat prior to removal from the province or state of origin.
• Removal of antlers and the connecting bone plate from the remainder of the skull, and removal of any attached hide or soft tissue from the skull portion. The bone plate and antler bases must be treated with a solution consisting of not less than 2% chlorine.
• Removal of raw capes and hides and sealing them in a waterproof container to ensure that no fluids, tissue or hair can escape. This may be brought into BC provided that it is delivered within 5 days of entry to a licensed tanning facility for chemical processing.
NoNo
57
ManitobaYYFarmed Elk - Manitoba Department of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Initiatives; Contact:nelson.bowley@gov.mb.ca Other Cervids - Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship; Contact: richard.davis@gov.mb.caRegulations regarding importation of farmed elk set out in Livestock Diverstification Act incuding a ban on elk from any jurisdiction where CWD was diagnosed within past five (5) years. Prohibit importation of native and exotic cervids.Ban on the possession of any product that contains urine, feces, saliva or scent glands of a cervid. Ban on feeding cervids to include all areas adjacent to jurisdictions where CWD is present in wild cervids.NAMandatory CWD testing program on all ranched cervid deaths.By regulation, all elk and deer harvested in Game Hunting Areas 5, 6, 6A, 11, 12, 13, 13A, 18 and 18B west of PR 366, 118A, 8C, and that part of 22 west of PTH 83 must be presented for testing. This area is that part of Manitoba adjacent to west central Saskatchewan where CWD has been spreading eastward in both farmed and wild elk and deer. A scenario based Action Plan has been developed in preparation for any discoveries through hunter supplied sample surveillance.
Approximately 300 wildlife samples are tested annually.
Baiting of cervids for hunting purposes is prohibited. Illegal to hunt within 0.8 km of a substance that is acting as a cervid bait.Feeding wild cervids for any purposes is banned in Game Hunting Areas 5, 6, 6A, 11, 12, 13, 13A, 18, 18A, 18B, 18C, that part of
22 west of Provincial Trunk Highway 83, 23 & 23A. Conservation Officers given authority to order the removal of any cervid attractant that poses a risk to wildlife, livestock, or persons.
Ban on the importation of hunter harvested cervids from any province, territory or country without first removing head, hide, hooves, mammary glands, entrails, internal organs and spinal column. Antlers and connecting bone plates allowed if disinfected and all other hide and tissue are removed. Capes allowed but must be immediately chemically processed into a tanned product. Possession of any product that contains urine, feces, saliva or scent glands of a cervid is prohibited.NoNo
58
New
Brunswick*
NNPermit for captive willdlife issued by Minister of Natural ResourcesNo regulationsNo regulationsNoTesting of captive cervids under jurisdiction of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.High risk animals tested. In last 4 years have tested 14 animals, all negative.NoNo, but strongly encourage public not to feed deer.No, but permit is required to move, sell, or barter any wildlife or wildlife parts.NoNo
59
Northwest
Territories*
NNDepartment of Environment and Natural Resources. Brett Elkin, brett_elkin@gov.nt.ca, (867) 873-7761NWT Wildlife Act & Regulations: Game Farm License, Permit to Import Live VertebratesNo regulations currently in place specific to CWD.New Wildlife Act for the Northwest Territories came into force in 2014. Regulations pertaining to wildlife and animal health issues (including CWD) being considered.N/APeriodic opportunistic sampling of wild cervids for CWD testing.No person shall, without a permit, set out or use bait to attract big game or other prescribed wildlife.Subject to subsection (2), no person shall intentionally feed big fame, fur-bearers or other prescribed wildlife.No person shall import into or transport in the Northwest Territories dead wildlife that is prescribed as a potential carrier of a disease or other condition, or prescribed parts or derivatives of such wildlife, unless the person is permitted, in accordance with the regulations, to import or tranpsort it.NoNo
60
Nova ScotiaNNWildlife Division, Department of Natural Resources, 136 Exibition St, Kentville Nova Scotia B4N 4E5 Peter MacDonald 902-679-6140 macdonpr@gov.ns.caFarming of cervid animals is regulated under the Wildlife Act. See
http://www.gov.ns.ca/just/regulations/regs/WIdeerf.ht m Licences issued by Department of Agriculture
No regulations in place specific to CWDNAAny suspicious illnesses or mortalities would be tested for CWD. Nothing to date.Would be conducted through the Canadian Cooperative Wildlife Health Centre at University of Prince Edward Island.NONONo person shall, while in a wildlife habitat, possess or use a product that contains or purports to contain any body part of a member of the deer family, including urine, blood, or other fluids.NONO
61
OntarioNNCanadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has jurisdiction over captive cervids in all provinces/territories under the Health of Animals Act & Regulations regarding reportable diseases (CWD, Tb, Brucellosis, …). Provincial jurisdiction over farmed cervids is with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA). Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) has jurisdiction over non-captive wildlife except migratory birds.. Brian Tapscott, brian.tapscott@ontario.ca Chris Heydon, chris.heydon@ontario.ca Natalie Gorman, natalie.gorman@ontario.ca Jolanta Kowalski, jolanta.kowalski@ontario.ca Dr. Balroop Nanhar, balroop.nahar@inspection.gc.caCervid farms are not licensed provincially but are regulated federally. Movement between farms requires CFIA permit. Movement of live white-tailed deer, American elk, moose & woodland caribou into Ontario requires specified requirements be met and a permit issued by MNRF under O. Reg. 666/98 of the FWCA. If those cervids are to be off loaded in Ontario, premises requirments must also be met.
MNRF, in its role to protect wildlife, prohibits releases of farmed cervids to the wild and regulations govern escapes (requires government notification and recapture) and prohibits hunting of cervids in captivity under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act & Regulations.
Ontario approved a provincial CWD Surveillance & Response Plan in 2005. Ontario passed a regulation in Nov 2005 to prohibit possession in Ontario of high risk parts of deer, elk and other cervids except moose and caribou harvested in other jurisdictions. New regulations were passed in 2010 to 1) prohibit the possession and use of natural attractants that contain parts or bodily fluids of a member of the deer family for the purposes of hunting in Ontario (e.g. natural deer urine/by-products) 2) Restrict the possession of certain higher risk carcass parts (e.g. brain, spinal column, antlers) of moose & caribou that were killed outside the province. This regulation is in addition to a previously existing regulation for carcasses of all other members of the deer family & 3) Restricts the transport of live white-tailed deer, American elk, moose & woodland caribou into Ontario unless accompanied by a provincial permit. In order to obtain a provincial permit for transporting through (and/or into) Ontario, the importer must meet specific requirements. If imported for slaughter, the animals must be slaughtered immediately.Cervid Movement Permit must be issued by CFIA before animals are moved. CFIA Interim Policy-Cervidae Movement Permit Policy, January 1, 2006. CFIA will only issue permit if veterinary inspector is satisfied that movement of animal would not, or would not be likely to, result in the spread of TB or brucellosis. Updating of provincial CWD Response Strategy for wild cervids is expected to be completed in 2016.CFIA is the National Administrator for the National Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Voluntary Herd Certification Program http://www.cfia- acia.agr.ca/english/anima/disemala/cwdmdc/far mfermee.shtml
The Canadian Sheep Federation is the Regional Administrator for the Program for Ontario cervid producers.
OMAFRA oversees voluntary CWD surveillance for farmed cervids. The Ontario CWD Surveillance Project for Farmed Cervids was launched from April 1, 2006 in an attempt to increase the level of CWD surveillance in farmed cervids. As of March 2016, an additional 2,093 farmed cervids have been tested since April 1, 2006. Since 1998 a total of 3,043 farmed cervids have been tested. All results to date have been negative for CWD.
CWD surveillance of wild cervids has resulted in the testing of approximately 10,788 white-tailed deer and 63 elk (to March 2016) since CWD testing began in 2002. To date, all samples have been negative for CWD. Ontario has recently moved to testing geographic areas identified as high risk for CWD detection by computer modelling and will test approximately 460 deer per year within that geographic area. (99% chance of detecting CWD at greater than or equal to 1% prevalence).No; province is increasing awareness through communications of potential risk of CWD transmission if detected in Ontario related to baiting for wild, hunted cervids. A policy-level review of wildlife baiting and feeding is ongoing.No; province is increasing awareness or potential risk of CWD transmission if detected in Ontario related to feeding wild deer and elk through communications; province now discourages feeding deer except in emergency situations triggered by a snow depth index of winter severity. It is common practice for people to feed deer / bait for the purposes of hunting. A policy-level review of wildlife feeding is ongoing, with regard to disease transmission implications from wildlife feeding.Yes; possession of high risk parts from harvested cervids from other jurisdictions not permitted. High risk parts include whole or any part of antlers, head, brain, eyes, tonsils, hide, hooves, lymph nodes, spleen, mammary glands, entrails, internal organs and spinal column (some exceptions provided for taxidermy materials e.g. cleaned antlers and skull cap, hide if sealed in container and delivered to taxidermist within 5 days and for scientific materials)NoNo
62
Prince
Edward
Island*
NNAgriculture & Forestry ( Fish & Wildlife section) chuck Gallison cegallison@gov.pe.caGame Farm and Keeping of Wildlife in Captivitiy regsCanadian Food inspection agency
63
QuebecNNCanadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has jurisdiction over captive cervids in all provinces/territories under the Health of Animals Act & Regulations regarding reportable diseases.
The Ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs (MFFP) is in charge of carrying out the Act respecting the conservation and development of wildlife (R.S.Q., c. C-61.1) over captive and free ranging cervids.
Contact: Isabelle Laurion, isabelle.laurion@mffp.gouv.qc.ca
The Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAPAQ) is in charge of carrying out the Food Products Act (chapter P-29) and the Animal Health Protection Act (R.S.Q., c. P-42) over captive cervids.
Contact: Isabelle McKenzie, isabelle.mckenzie@mapaq.gouv.qc.ca.
Transportation authorization permit (TAP) must be issued by CFIA before animals are moved.In April 2001, the Regulation respecting the health certification of imported animals (R.S.Q.,
c. P-42), enacted by Order in Council, made it mandatory for operators to have a certificate for all farmed cervids imported into Quebec issued by the chief veterinarian or other competent officer of the province or of the country of origin attesting that the animals do not have CWD.
To bolster the Regulation, in June 2001, MAPAQ established an import protocol according to which importers must have prior authorization to import cervids into Quebec from the Director of the “Direction de la santé et du bien-être des animaux ” (DSBEA).
On February 26, 2009, the Regulation respecting the identification and traceability of certain animals has been amended to include cervids.The cervid producers’ obligations are to: register with ATQ; affix identification tags, report the entry, removal, disappearance or death of a cervid; replace lost tags; provide the tag numbers (destroyed, losted or invalidated tag); report cessation of activities or transfer of ownership.
Quebec runs a Voluntary CWD Surveillance Program in captive cervids since 2002. The program was produced based on the national standards established in 2002 by the CFIA for the creation of a Canadian Chronic Wasting Disease Voluntary Herd Certification Program. MAPAQ is in charge of the administration of the program.
MAPAQ conducted also a CWD abattoir surveillance.The monitoring in slaughter-houses under provincial inspection started in september 2007 and in slaughter-houses under federal inspection started in april 2010.
Between 2002 until December 2015, 19 569 farmed cervids were tested. All results to date are negative for CWD.
A total of 388 free ranging white-tailed deer have been opportunistically tested from 2000-2006. In October 2007, MFFP began a structured surveillance program using mainly road-killed deer sampling in the southern part of the province. From October 2007 to December 2013 the program led to the collection of more than 4 400 free ranging white-tailed deer. Between 2011 and 2015, more than 2 700 additional samples were collected on harvested white-tailed deer. To date, all samples have been negative for CWD.No ban at this time.MFFP recommends not to feed deer.As of January 2012, the possession of full carcasses or any part of the brain, spinal cord, eyes, retropharyngeal lymph nodes, tonsils, testicles or internal organs of cervids (except caribou) killed outside Québec is prohibited. That prohibition does not apply to the following body parts: boneless meat, quarters without pieces of spinal column or head attached, degreased or tanned skin and hide, antlers without velvet, disinfected skull plates without attached meat or tissue, teeth without attached meat or tissue and any piece mounted by a taxidermist.NoNo
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SaskatchewanNNSaskatchewan Agriculture - contact Dr. Betty Althouse, CVO Animal Health Unit, Livestock Branchhttp://www.qp.gov.sk.ca/documents/English/Regulati ons/Regulations/A20-2R10.pdf The Domestic Game Farm Animal Regulations - Licensing of domestic game farm elk, white-tailed deer, mule deer, moose, fallow deer, reindeer, antelope, big horn sheep, thinhorn sheep, mouflon sheep, musk deer, mountain goat game farms. The regulations require reporting escapes and intrusions, identification, herd inventory record keeping, movement permits, CWD surveillance program requirements are mandatory, permit required for import, (Sika, red deer and elk/red deer hybrid game farming prohibited), slaughter processing requirements.CWD is regulated by both Ministries of Environment and Agriculture. Wildlife regs allow wildlife be held in captivity with a licence for the purpose of an operating zoo or a commercial wildlife farm. Wildlife regulations also has authority to issue an import license for domestic game farm animals - Domestic Game Farm Animal Regulations require annually, 1) a complete list of the disposition of and number of each species held and 2) a complete list of the number of species held and from whom and when each was obtained. Domestic Game Farm Animal Regulations require that escapes from captivity be reported and any incidence of death, including slaughter, be reported and submitted for CWD testing. Domestic Game Farm Animal regulations make it mandatory that all game farm operators participate in the province's CWD surveillance program.Saskatchewan has developed Import guidelines written by Ministries of Agriculture and Environment for evaluating the risk of importing domestic game farm animals from other jurisdications. Import requests are evaluated by both Ministries with Environment having authority to sign the import permit. The process for importation of game farm animals into Saskatchewan is being reviewed by Ministries of Environment and Agriculture.Mandatory CWD Surveillance Program since Dec 31, 2001 written in the Domestic Game Farm Animal regulations - must report all deaths within 24 hours and must submit samples within 15 days of all captive cervids over 12 months of age dying for any reason. To date (March 10, 2016) 81 game farms within SK have tested positive for CWD. There are approximately 229 licensed game farms with approximately 15,118 cervids; of those farms 22 are active on the Voluntary Herd Certification Program. Since January 2001 until December 31, 2015 over 49,483 farmed cervids have been tested for CWD.Saskatchewan operated a CWD hunter surveillance program from 1997 - 2012 and for 2015-16 season. Samples from 2012 to August 2015 included targeted samples of sick and dead animals collected by conservation officers and collar- marked research animals. Cervids that tested positive as of March 2016 for CWD include 355/28,387 Mule Deer, 84/15,694 White-tailed deer, 9/1,596 elk, and 1/155 Moose. There are currently 28 WMZ showing occurrence of infection.
Eradication of CWD from wild cervid populations is no longer a realistic option for the province.
NoNoNoYesYes
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YukonYY*Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has jurisdiction over captive cervids in all provinces/territories under the Health of Animals Act & Regulations regarding reportable diseases. Yukon Department of Environment has authority over captive and wild cervids in Yukon. Contact Chief Veterinary Officer - Mary VanderKop - 867- 456-5582Wildlife Act - Game Farm RegulationsNo regulations but a moratorium exists to prohibit the import of game farmed animals (elk are the only game farmed cervid in Yukon) and there is a prohibition against the import of cervids making exception for animals in transit through Yukon.Regulation enacted May 2, 2013 to prohibit the import of cervids that died or were killed outside Yukon with exemption for imports from Northwest Territories, northern hunting zones in BC and for edible meat that is deboned or removed from spinal column and head, finished taxidermy mounts, teeth, antlers with no tissue and hide contained before delivery for processing. Exemption for carcasses in transit if contained (leak-proof). Also prohibit possession, sale, import any product for hunting or trapping that contains cervid parts.Yes, mandatory program as condition of the Game Farm Licence to test all captive cervids.Yes - all harvested wild elk are tested (mandatory with hunting license) and road killed cervids are tested opportunitistically. All negative to date.Not practiced hereNot practiced hereRegulation enacted May 2, 2013 to prohibit the import of cervids that died or were killed outside Yukon with exemption for imports from Northwest Territories, northern hunting zones in BC and for edible meat that is deboned or removed from spinal column and head, finished taxidermy mounts, teeth, antlers with no tissue and hide contained before delivery for processing. Exemption for carcasses in transit if contained (leak-proof). Also prohibit possession, sale, import any product for hunting or trapping that contains cervid parts.NoNo
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* Standard Regulations are: 1)Certification of Veterinary Inspection (health certificate), 2)Import Permit, 3)Negative brucellosis test (within 30-60 days of import), 4)Negative tuberculosis test (within 30-90 days of import)* Standard Regulations are: 1)Certification of Veterinary Inspection (health certificate), 2)Import Permit, 3)Negative brucellosis test (within 30-60 days of import), 4)Negative tuberculosis test (within 30-90 days of import)
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