Senior Seminars in Psychology, 2017-2018
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

 
View only
 
 
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZAA
1
TermCourse numberCourse TitleCount for NS track?InstructorMeeting TimeCourse DescriptionsURL for SyllabusPre-req or questions to be answeredUp to how many can be pre-registered?
2
FallPsyc 402Topics in Infant Cognition. Topic for Fall 2017, Social Animals: Origins of Kindness and BigotryWynnTh 1:30-3:20This class will explore a highly interdisciplinary body of scientific research – with human infants and children as well as adult studies, comparative work with other species, cross cultural & anthropological findings, and evolutionary theory – to gain a better understanding of human morality and immorality, including cooperation & altruism, our social preferences and proclivities, and our tribal natures. 15
3
FallPsyc 404Emotion and CognitionSiemerMW 11.35-12.50The course presents an overview of current research questions and results in the area of cognition and emotion. We explore basic research questions as well as implications of cognitive approaches toward emotions for domains such as emotional disorders and psychological resilience and well-being.https://www.dropbox.com/sh/ocy96g877bszxsh/AACrJlJUUjZQq59xpOo-QmJAa?dl=015
4
FallPsyc 409Science of Free WillNSBrownW 1.30-3.20The scientific facts and arguments behind the theory that free will is an illusion or invalid construct. Implications of this theory for religion, law, and morality. Supporting evidence drawn from the fields of psychology, neuroscience, genetics, physics, and complex adaptive systems.15
5
FallPSYC412/CGSC412Theories of Human UniquenessSheskinM 3.30-5.20An overview of several theories of human uniqueness. Foundational topics including human language vs. animal communication, human moral psychology vs. animal social behavior, and transmission of human culture vs. intergenerational learning in animals. Debates including how theories of human uniqueness relate to each other, and whether any constitute a categorical difference between human and nonhuman animals.  marksheskin.com/docs/HumanUniquenessDraftSyllabus.pdf10
6
FallPsyc 428Decision Neuroscience SeminarNSCrockettT 1.30-3.20An overview and examination of the neuroscience of decision making. Interdisciplinary course highlighting research from cognitive neuroscience, psychology, behavioral economics, finance, marketing, computer science, and public health. Topics include utility and value, reinforcement learning, risky decision making, intertemporal choice, social decision making, impulsivity and self control, psychopathology, and commercial (e.g., neuromarketing) and public health applications.https://www.dropbox.com/s/8shv6za8l9dp12x/PSYC428_F17.docx?dl=015
7
SpringPsyc 414Psychology of Gender ImagesLaFranceMW 1-2.15The nature and psychological impact of exposure to visual images that portray various dimensions of gender, such as sex differences and sexuality, in various media, including advertising, television, film, and Facebook. How to empirically decode gender images in contemporary media as well as assess their range of influences. The overall aim is to understand how visual representations of gender affect psychological identity and well-being.15
8
SpringPsyc 425/625Social PerceptionSchollT 1.30-3.30How does the mind work? One of the deepest insights of cognitive science is that this question does not have a single answer: there is no one way that the mind works, because the mind is not one thing. Instead it has parts, and different parts of the mind work in different ways. Accordingly, a great deal of research has involved asking about how one part of the mind influences another part (e.g. when studying the influence of emotion on reasoning, or language on memory). This seminar will explore one such connection, between two aspects of the mind that are generally thought to be rather distinct.

We typically think of visual perception as among the earliest of our basic cognitive processes, while we think of social cognition as among the most advanced forms of higher-level cognition. In this seminar we will explore how these two aspects of the mind connect. We will examine how social influences do and do not influence what we see, and how visual perception itself traffics in (and may be specialized for) social information. Specific topics will likely include the perception of agency; biological motion; face perception (including the perception of facial attractiveness); gaze processing and social attention; the perception of race, and 'perceptual stereotyping'; social color vision; social olfaction; and social and cultural influences on perception (and the lack thereof).
http://perception.yale.edu/Brian/courses/SocialPerc-Syllabus.pdf6
9
SpringPsyc 437Minds, Brains, and MachinesJara-EttingerTh 3.30-5.20Leibniz compared the brain to a mill, Freud to a hydraulic system, Sherrington to a telegraph, and now we think of it as a computer. Have we gotten it right? If so, what kind of computer is the brain? And what kind of software is the mind? In this seminar we are going to explore these questions by combining classical and cutting-edge readings from philosophy, cognitive science, and artificial intelligence. We’ll discuss reasons to be optimistic about the future of AI, and reasons to believe that the approach was doomed from the start. By the end of the seminar you will have a solid understanding of the fundamental ideas driving research in cognitive science and Artificial Intelligence (as well as the ideas that have been left behind).

We'll figure out what it means to claim that the brain is a kind of computer, and whether this claims makes sense; we'll discuss its implications about how to study biological intelligence and how to engineer artificial intelligence; and we'll explore the question empirically, looking at advances in AI and its current limitations.
http://web.mit.edu/jjara/www/docs/Syllabus_437.pdf15
10
SpringPsyc 477Psychopathology and the FamilyLockhartM 1.30-3.20The influence of the family on development and maintenance of both normal and abnormal behavior. Special emphasis on the role of early childhood experiences. Psychological, biological, and sociocultural factors within the family that contribute to variations in behavior. Relations between family and disorders such as schizophrenia, depression, anorexia nervosa, and criminality. Family therapy approaches and techniques.15
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
Loading...
 
 
 
Sheet1