S. H. Black Studies Library Catalogue (s/W/s Shared Libraries)
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Black Studies library catalogueUpdated 6 Dec 2019
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Simplified catalogue with just book covers & titles: https://softwallstuds.libib.com/
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OutTitleAuthorsPublisherYearDescriptionISBN 10ISBN 13CopiesNotes
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Abolition Democracy: Beyond Empire, Prisons, and Torture (Open Media Series)Angela Y. Davis
Seven Stories Press
2005
Revelations about U.S policies and practices of torture and abuse have captured headlines ever since the breaking of the Abu Ghraib prison story in April 2004. Since then, a debate has raged regarding what is and what is not acceptable behavior for the world’s leading democracy. It is within this context that Angela Davis, one of America’s most remarkable political figures, gave a series of interviews to discuss resistance and law, institutional sexual coercion, politics and prison. Davis talks about her own incarceration, as well as her experiences as "enemy of the state," and about having been put on the FBI’s "most wanted" list. She talks about the crucial role that international activism played in her case and the case of many other political prisoners.Throughout these interviews, Davis returns to her critique of a democracy that has been compromised by its racist origins and institutions. Discussing the most recent disclosures about the disavowed "chain of command," and the formal reports by the Red Cross and Human Rights Watch denouncing U.S. violation of human rights and the laws of war in Guantánamo, Afghanistan and Iraq, Davis focuses on the underpinnings of prison regimes in the United States.
158322695897815832269571
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African Feminism: The Politics of Survival in Sub-Saharan AfricaGwendolyn Mikell (Editor)
University of Pennsylvania Press
1997
African feminism, this landmark volume demonstrates, differs radically from the Western forms of feminism with which we have become familiar since the 1960s. African feminists are not, by and large, concerned with issues such as female control over reproduction or variation and choice within human sexuality, nor with debates about essentialism, the female body, or the discourse of patriarchy. The feminism that is slowly emerging in Africa is distinctly heterosexual, pronatal, and concerned with "bread, butter, and power" issues.Contributors present case studies of ten African states, demonstrating that—as they fight for access to land, for the right to own property, for control of food distribution, for living wages and safe working conditions, for health care, and for election reform—African women are creating a powerful and specifically African feminism.
081221580X
97808122158091
7
African Tales (One World, One Planet)Gcina MhlopheBarefoot Books2009
This African collection is beautifully illustrated with hand-sewn embroidered artwork decorated with African beads on a silk base. The eight tales are from Ghana, Senegal, Lesotho, Namibia, Malawi, Sudan, Swaziland and Ethiopia; each is prefaced by a short introduction to the country.
184686118797818468611851
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Afro Asia: Revolutionary Political and Cultural Connections between African Americans and Asian Americans
Fred Ho (Editor), Bill V. Mullen (Editor)
Duke University Press Books
2008
With contributions from activists, artists, and scholars, Afro Asia is a groundbreaking collection of writing on the historical alliances, cultural connections, and shared political strategies linking African Americans and Asian Americans. Bringing together autobiography, poetry, scholarly criticism, and other genres, this volume represents an activist vanguard in the cultural struggle against oppression.Afro Asia opens with analyses of historical connections between people of African and of Asian descent. An account of nineteenth-century Chinese laborers who fought against slavery and colonialism in Cuba appears alongside an exploration of African Americans’ reactions to and experiences of the Korean “conflict.” Contributors examine the fertile period of Afro-Asian exchange that began around the time of the 1955 Bandung Conference, the first meeting of leaders from Asian and African nations in the postcolonial era. One assesses the relationship of two important 1960s Asian American activists to Malcolm X and the Black Panthers. Mao Ze Dong’s 1963 and 1968 statements in support of black liberation are juxtaposed with an overview of the influence of Maoism on African American leftists.Turning to the arts, Ishmael Reed provides a brief account of how he met and helped several Asian American writers. A Vietnamese American spoken-word artist describes the impact of black hip-hop culture on working-class urban Asian American youth. Fred Ho interviews Bill Cole, an African American jazz musician who plays Asian double-reed instruments. This pioneering collection closes with an array of creative writing, including poetry, memoir, and a dialogue about identity and friendship that two writers, one Japanese American and the other African American, have performed around the United States.Contributors: Betsy Esch, Diane C. Fujino, royal hartigan, Kim Hewitt, Cheryl Higashida, Fred Ho,Everett Hoagland, Robin D. G. Kelley, Bill V. Mullen, David Mura, Ishle Park, Alexs Pate, Thien-bao Thuc Phi, Ishmael Reed, Kalamu Ya Salaam, Maya Almachar Santos, JoYin C. Shih, Ron Wheeler, Daniel Widener, Lisa Yun
82234281297808223428161
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Amalgamation Schemes: Antiblackness and the Critique of MultiracialismJared Sexton
University of Minnesota Press
2008
Despite being heralded as the answer to racial conflict in the post–civil rights United States, the principal political effect of multiracialism is neither a challenge to the ideology of white supremacy nor a defiance of sexual racism. More accurately, Jared Sexton argues in Amalgamation Schemes, multiculturalism displaces both by evoking long-standing tenets of antiblackness and prescriptions for normative sexuality. In this timely and penetrating analysis, Sexton pursues a critique of contemporary multiracialism, from the splintered political initiatives of the multiracial movement to the academic field of multiracial studies, to the melodramatic media declarations about “the browning of America.” He contests the rationales of colorblindness and multiracial exceptionalism and the promotion of a repackaged family values platform in order to demonstrate that the true target of multiracialism is the singularity of blackness as a social identity, a political organizing principle, and an object of desire. From this vantage, Sexton interrogates the trivialization of sexual violence under chattel slavery and the convoluted relationship between racial and sexual politics in the new multiracial consciousness. An original and challenging intervention, Amalgamation Schemes posits that multiracialism stems from the conservative and reactionary forces determined to undo the gains of the modern civil rights movement and dismantle radical black and feminist politics. Jared Sexton is assistant professor of African American studies and film and media studies at the University of California, Irvine.
81665105197808166510541
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American Civilization
C. L. R. James, Anna Grimshaw (Editor), Keith Hart (Editor)
John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated
1993
In his study of Herman Melville, "Mariners, Renegades and Castaways" (1976) C.L.R. James wrote: "My ultimate aim...is to write a study of American Civilization". This project, long in gestation, at last sees the light of day in this posthumous publication of what may be seen as the most wide-ranging expression of James's thought, the link between his mature writings on politics and his semi-autobiographical work, "Beyond a Boundary". In the tradition of de Tocqueville's "Democracy in America", James addresses the fundamental question of the "right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness". Ranging across American politics, society and culture, C.L.R. James sets out to integrate his analysis of American society in transition with a commentary on the popular arts of cinema and literature.
63118909297806311890911
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American Crucible: Slavery, Emancipation And Human Rights, TheRobin BlackburnVerso2013
The American Crucible furnishes a vivid and authoritative history of the rise and fall of slavery in the Americas. For over three centuries enslavement promoted the rise of capitalism in the Atlantic world. The New World became the crucible for a succession of fateful experiments in colonization, silver mining, plantation agriculture, racial enslavement, colonial rebellion, slave witness and slave resistance. Slave produce raised up empires, fostered new cultures of consumption and financed the breakthrough to an industrial order. Not until the stirrings of a revolutionary age in the 1780s was there the first public challenge to the ‘peculiar institution’. An anti-slavery alliance then set the scene for great acts of emancipation in Haiti in 1804, Britain in 1833–8, the United States in the 1860s, and Cuba and Brazil in the 1880s. In The American Crucible, Robin Blackburn argues that the anti-slavery movement forged many of the ideals we live by today.‘The best treatment of slavery in the western hemisphere I know of. I think it shouldestablish itself as a permanent pillar of the literature.’ Eric Hobsbawm
178168106697817816810601
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Angela Davis: An AutobiographyAngela Y. DavisIntl Pub1974This is Angela Davis' Autobiography71780667797807178066761
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Are Prisons Obsolete?Angela Y. Davis
Seven Stories Press
2003
With her characteristic brilliance, grace and radical audacity, Angela Y. Davis has put the case for the latest abolition movement in American life: the abolition of the prison. As she quite correctly notes, American life is replete with abolition movements, and when they were engaged in these struggles, their chances of success seemed almost unthinkable. For generations of Americans, the abolition of slavery was sheerest illusion. Similarly,the entrenched system of racial segregation seemed to last forever, and generations lived in the midst of the practice, with few predicting its passage from custom. The brutal, exploitative (dare one say lucrative?) convict-lease system that succeeded formal slavery reaped millions to southern jurisdictions (and untold miseries for tens of thousands of men, and women). Few predicted its passing from the American penal landscape. Davis expertly argues how social movements transformed these social, political and cultural institutions, and made such practices untenable.In Are Prisons Obsolete?, Professor Davis seeks to illustrate that the time for the prison is approaching an end. She argues forthrightly for "decarceration", and argues for the transformation of the society as a whole.
158322581197815832258131
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Argentina
Gale (Editor), Jeff Hay (Editor), Frank Chalk (Consultant Editor)
Greenhaven Publishing LLC
2014
This anthology contains a collection of writings, chosen for their unique insights into Argentina's Dirty War, during which an estimated 10,000 to 30,000 citizens were killed by Argentina's military dictatorship. It includes writings that detail the factors that gave rise to the conflict, and first-person narratives are provided, to give the reader insight into the thoughts of the people who experienced the events. Critical information is broken out and encapsulated into charts, timelines, and graphs. Maps are provided, detailing key geographic information.
73776895997807377689541
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Ariel's Ecology: Plantations, Personhood, and Colonialism in the American TropicsMonique Allewaert
Univ Of Minnesota Press
2013
What happens if we abandon the assumption that a person is a discrete, world-making agent who acts on and creates place? This, Monique Allewaert contends, is precisely what occurred on eighteenth-century American plantations, where labor practices and ecological particularities threatened the literal and conceptual boundaries that separated persons from the natural world.Integrating political philosophy and ecocriticism with literary analysis, Ariel’s Ecology explores the forms of personhood that developed out of New World plantations, from Georgia and Florida through Jamaica to Haiti and extending into colonial metropoles such as Philadelphia. Allewaert’s examination of the writings of naturalists, novelists, and poets; the oral stories of Africans in the diaspora; and Afro-American fetish artifacts shows that persons in American plantation spaces were pulled into a web of environmental stresses, ranging from humidity to the demand for sugar. This in turn gave rise to modes of personhood explicitly attuned to human beings’ interrelation with nonhuman forces in a process we might call ecological.Certainly the possibility that colonial life revokes human agency haunts works from Shakespeare’s Tempest and Montesquieu’s Spirit of the Laws to Spivak’s theories of subalternity. In Allewaert’s interpretation, the transformation of colonial subjectivity into ecological personhood is not a nightmare; it is, rather, a mode of existence until now only glimmering in Che Guevara’s dictum that postcolonial resistance is synonymous with “perfect knowledge of the ground.”
081667728X
97808166772831
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Assata: An AutobiographyAssata Shakur
Chicago Review Press
2001
This presents the life story of African American revolutionary Shakur, previously known as JoAnne Chesimard.
155652074397815565207471
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Being Black: Zen and the Art of Living with Fearlessness and Grace (Compass)Angel Kyodo WilliamsPenguin Books2002
Being Black has gained an enthusiastic following in African American and Zen communities. Angel Kyodo Williams shows black Americans how to develop a "warrior-spirit" of truth and responsibility that can lead to happiness and personal transformation. The principles and tools she offers provide a framework for addressing the African American community's unique worries, hopes, challenges, and expectations. Williams uses an eloquent, hip, and honest approach to share personal stories, time-tested teachings, and simple guidelines that invite readers of all faiths to discover how to step into the freedom of a life lived with fearlessness, grace, and fluidity.
14019630797801401963061
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Beyond a BoundaryC.L.R. JamesPantheon1984
In C. L. R. James's classic Beyond a Boundary, the sport is cricket and the scene is the colonial West Indies. Always eloquent and provocative, James--the "black Plato," (as coined by the London Times)--shows us how, in the rituals of performance and conflict on the field, we are watching not just prowess but politics and psychology at play. Part memoir of a boyhood in a black colony (by one of the founding fathers of African nationalism), part passionate celebration of an unusual and unexpected game, Beyond a Boundary raises, in a warm and witty voice, serious questions about race, class, politics, and the facts of colonial oppression. Originally published in England in 1963 and in the United States twenty years later (Pantheon, 1983), this second American edition brings back into print this prophetic statement on race and sport in society.
39472283397803947228322
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Black Feminist Reader, The
Joy James (Editor), T. Denean Sharpley-Whiting (Editor)
Wiley-Blackwell2000
Organized into two parts, "Literary Theory" and "Social and Political Theory," this Reader explores issues of community, identity, justice, and the marginalization of African American and Caribbean women in literature, society, and political movements.
63121007597806312100781
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Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment (Perspectives on Gender)Patricia Hill CollinsRoutledge1990
In spite of the double burden of racial and gender discrimination, African-American women have developed a rich intellectual tradition that is not widely known. In Black Feminist Thought, Patricia Hill Collins explores the words and ideas of Black feminist intellectuals as well as those African-American women outside academe. She provides an interpretive framework for the work of such prominent Black feminist thinkers as Angela Davis, bell hooks, Alice Walker, and Audre Lorde. The result is a superbly crafted book that provides the first synthetic overview of Black feminist thought.
41590597497804159059781
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Black Intellectuals and the Dilemmas of Race and Class in TrinidadIvar Oxaal
Schenkman Books, Incorporated
198287073417297808707341751
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Black Jacobins, TheC L R JamesPenguin UK2001
In 1789 the West Indian colony of San Domingo supplied two-thirds of the overseas trade of France. The entire structure of what was arguably the most profitable colony in the world rested on the labour of half a million slaves. In 1791 the waves of unrest inspired by the French Revolution reached across the Atlantic dividing the loyalties of the white population of the island. The brutally treated slaves of Saint Domingo seized at this confusion and rose up in rebellion against masters. In thisclassic work, CLR James chronicles the only successful slave revolt in history and provides a critical portrait of their leader, Toussaint L'Ouverture, 'one of the most remarkable men of a period rich in remarkable men'.
14029981597801402998161
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Black Music (AkashiClassics: Renegade Reprint Series)LeRoi Jones (Amiri Baraka)Akashic Books2010
"Jones has learned--and this has been very rare in jazz criticism--to write about music as an artist." --Nat Hentoff. Black Music is a book about the brilliant young jazz musicians of the early 1960s: John Coltrane, Thelonious Monk, Miles Davis, Ornette Coleman, Cecil Taylor, Archie Shepp, Sun Ra, and others. It is composed of essays, reviews, interviews, liner notes, musical analyses, and personal impressions from 1959–1967. Also includes Amiri Baraka's reflections in a 2009 interview with Calvin Reid of Publishers Weekly.LeRoi Jones (now known as Amiri Baraka) is the author of numerous books of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. He was named Poet Laureate of New Jersey from 2002 to 2004 by the New Jersey Commission on Humanities. His most recent book, Tales of the Out & the Gone (Akashic Books, 2007), was a New York Times Editors' Choice and winner of a PEN/Beyond Margins Award. He lives in Newark, New Jersey.
193335493397819333549341
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Black Power beyond Borders: The Global Dimensions of the Black Power Movement (Contemporary Black History)Nico Slate (Editor)Palgrave Macmillan2012
Black Power burst out of nowhere in 1966—a saga of pride, anger, and violence that threatened the civil rights movement and challenged the very fabric of America. Or at least that's how it seemed to many Americans. The story of Black Power is older, richer, and more global than many recognize. In Black Power Beyond Borders, famous figures like Stevie Wonder and the Black Panthers emerge in a new light alongside lesser known organizations like the Polynesian Panthers. From Harlem and Oakland to India and Israel, Black Power inspired movements that challenged boundaries throughout the world.
113728506097811372850651
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Black Power: Three Books from Exile: Black Power; The Color Curtain; and White Man, Listen! (P.S.)Richard Wright
Harper Perennial Modern Classics
2008
Originally published in 1954, Richard Wright′s Black Power is an extraordinary nonfiction work by one of America′s premier literary giants of the twentieth century. An impassioned chronicle of the author′s trip to Africa′s Gold Coast before it became the free nation of Ghana, it speaks eloquently of empowerment and possibility, and resonates loudly to this day.Also included in this omnibus edition are two nonfiction works Wright produced around the time of Black Power. White Man, Listen! is a stirring collection of his essays on race, politics, and other essential social concerns ("Deserves to be read with utmost seriousness"-New York Times). The Color Curtain is an indispensable work urging the removal of the color barrier. It remains one of the key commentaries on the question of race in the modern era. ("Truth-telling will perhaps always be unpopular and suspect, but in The Color Curtain, as in all his later nonfiction, Wright did not hesitate to tell the truth as he saw it."-Amritjit Singh, Ohio University)
6144945897800614494511
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Black Reconstruction in America 1860 1880W. E. B. Du BoisScribner1995
The pioneering work in the study of the role of Black Americans during Reconstruction by the most influential Black intellectual of his time.
68482634897806848263491
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Black Worker in the Deep SouthHosea HudsonIntl Pub1991Book by Hudson, Hosea71780683997807178068361
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Bloods: Black Veterans of the Vietnam War: An Oral HistoryWallace TerryBallantine Books1985
"Simply the most powerful and moving book that has emerged on this topic." UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONALThe national bestseller that tells the truth of about Vietnam from the black soldiers' perspective. An oral history unlike any other, BLOODS features twenty black men who tell the story of how members of their race were sent off in disproportionate numbers and the special test of patriotism they faced. Told in voices no reader will soon forget, BLOODS is a must-read for anyone who wants to put the Vietnam experience in historical, cultural, and political perspective.Cited by THE NEW YORK TIMES as One of the Notable Books of the Year"Superb."TIME
34531197397803453119791
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C. L. R. James Reader, TheAnna Grimshaw (Editor)
John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated
1992
Author of such classic works as Minty Alley, The Black Jacobins and Beyond a Boundary, C. L. R. James was one of the most significant writers of our times. In a life which reflected many of the distinctive features of the twentieth century (from his birth in Trinidad in 1901, to his death in Brixton, London, 1989), James made an outstanding contribution to debates on politics, history, art, literature and sport. His revolutionary vision has inspired social movements in the United States, Britain, Africa and the Caribbean. It remains central to any understanding of the modern world. Until now much of his work has remained inaccessible; but Anna Grimshaw brings together here both published and unpublished material to give us the essential C. L. R. James. Prepared in collaboration with James in his final year, this collection offers unique insight into the range and development of his life's work. It includes a selection of early fiction, the complete text of the play The Black Jacobins, numerous extracts from his personal archive and the classic essays, The Case for West-Indian Self-Government, Popular Art and the Cultural Tradition and Black Power.
63118495397806311849591
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C. L. R. James: His Intellectual Legacies (Cultural Studies/Black Studies)Selwyn R. Cudjoe (Editor)
University of Massachusetts Press
1995
C.L.R. James (1901-1989) made important contributions in a host of fields--literature, criticism, cultural studies, political theory, history, and philosophy. One of the most astute minds of this century, he served as mentor for two generations of international intellectuals. He contributed enormously to their understanding of the colonial question, the Negro question, the Russian question, the role of dialectics in proletarian struggle, and the theory and practice of Marxism in the Americas. In addition to The Black Jacobins, his incisive account of the Haitian revolution of the 1790s, and Notes on Dialectics, James published a range of other books, including a classic work on the game of cricket and a study of Herman Melville.This collection of essays offers a variety of fresh perspectives on James's life and writings. Included are reminiscences of those who knew James well and critical essays by eminent scholars. The book is the first to offer a full treatment of James's many contributions to twentieth-century intellectual life.
87023907497808702390761
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C. L. R. James: His Life and WorkPaul Buhle (Editor)
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
198785031685597808503168581
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C. L. R. James's Caribbean
Paget Henry (Editor), Paul Buhle (Editor)
Duke University Press Books
1996
For more than half a century, C. L. R. James (1901–1989)—"the Black Plato," as coined by the London Times—has been an internationally renowned revolutionary thinker, writer, and activist.Born in Trinidad, his lifelong work was devoted to understanding and transforming race and class exploitation in his native West Indies, as well as in Britain and the United States. In C. L. R. James's Caribbean, noted scholars examine the roots ofboth James's life and oeuvre in connection with the economic, social, and political environment of the West Indies.Drawing upon James's observations of his own life as revealed to interviewers and close friends, this volume provides an examination of James's childhood and early years as colonial literatteur and his massive contribution to West Indian political-cultural understanding.Moving beyond previous biographical interpretations, the contributors here take up the problem of reading James's texts in light of poststructuralist criticism, the implications of his texts for Marxist discourse, and for problems of Caribbean development.
82231244197808223124441
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Cabo Verde: Photographs Joe WuerfelJoe Wuerfel
Nietsch Hans Verlag
2013386264346897838626434621
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Caliban's FreedomAnthony BoguesPluto Press1997
C.L.R. James (1901-1989) is one the few political thinkers whose ideas have made a genuinely significant contribution to the development of emancipatory ideas in the twentieth century. In this volume, Anthony Bogues examines the origins of the relationship between the black radical tradition and James's own view of Marxism. Integrating these two political currents provided the basis for a profound critique that became the hallmark of James's life's work.Anthony Bogues traces the main features of James's early political thought, up to his deportation from the United States in the early 1950s, arguing that his work represents a major attempt in the immediate postwar period to establish new frontiers in Marxism and radical political thought in general. This illuminating and scholarly study reinforces James's position as a political theorist of major standing.
74530614497807453061481
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Callaloo Nation: Metaphors of Race and Religious Identity among South Asians in Trinidad (Latin America Otherwise)Aisha Khan
Duke University Press Books
2004
Mixing--whether referred to as mestizaje, callaloo, hybridity, creolization, or multiculturalism--is a foundational cultural trope in Caribbean and Latin American societies. Historically entwined with colonial, anticolonial, and democratic ideologies, ideas about mixing are powerful forces in the ways identities are interpreted and evaluated. As Aisha Khan shows in this ethnography, they reveal the tension that exists between identity as a source of equality and identity as an instrument through which social and cultural hierarchies are reinforced. Focusing on the Indian diaspora in the Caribbean, Khan examines this paradox as it is expressed in key dimensions of Hindu and Muslim cultural history and social relationships in southern Trinidad. In vivid detail, she describes how disempowered communities create livable conditions for themselves while participating in a broader culture that both celebrates and denies difference.Khan combines ethnographic research she conducted in Trinidad over the course of a decade with extensive archival research to explore how Hindu and Muslim Indo-Trinidadians interpret authority, generational tensions, and the transformations of Indian culture in the Caribbean through metaphors of mixing. She demonstrates how ambivalence about the desirability of a callaloo nation—a multicultural society—is manifest around practices and issues, including rituals, labor, intermarriage, and class mobility. Khan maintains that metaphors of mixing are pervasive and worth paying attention to: the assumptions and concerns they communicate are key to unraveling who Indo-Trinidadians imagine themselves to be and how identities such as race and religion shape and are shaped by the politics of multiculturalism.
82233388097808223338831
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Caribbean Romances: The Politics of Regional Representation (New World Studies)Belinda Edmondson (Editor)
University of Virginia Press
1999
This interdisciplinary volume on postcolonial Caribbean culturebrings together ten essays by exciting young scholars who challenge some of theestablished assumptions of postcolonial studies. The contributors look at ways inwhich the "romance" trope is employed within contemporary Caribbean popular cultureand literature to idealize the newly independent, postcolonial societies of theregion.The essays situate this discourse ofidealization in its historical and cultural contexts and reveal how it is areinvention of the old romance initially constructed in the imperial imagination ofEurope and America.
81391822797808139182281
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Cartographies of the AbsoluteAlberto Toscano,Jeff KinkleZero Books2015
Can capital be seen? Cartographies of the Absolute surveys the disparate answers to this question offered by artists, film-makers, writers and theorists over the past few decades. It zones in on the crises of representation that have accompanied the enduring crisis of capitalism, foregrounding the production of new visions and artefacts that wrestle with the vastness, invisibility and complexity of the abstractions that rule our lives.
178099275097817809927541
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Cedric Robinson and the Philosophy of Black ResistanceDarryl C. Thomas
SAGE Publications, Limited
200576194430397807619443001
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Citizenship from Below: Erotic Agency and Caribbean Freedom (Next Wave: New Directions in Women's Studies)Mimi Sheller
Duke University Press Books
2012
Citizenship from Below boldly revises the history of the struggles for freedom by emancipated peoples in post-slavery Jamaica, post-independence Haiti, and the wider Caribbean by focusing on the interplay between the state, the body, race, and sexuality. Mimi Sheller offers a new theory of "citizenship from below" to describe the contest between "proper" spaces of legitimate high politics and the disavowed politics of lived embodiment. While acknowledging the internal contradictions and damaging exclusions of subaltern self-empowerment, Sheller roots out from beneath the historical archive traces of a deeper freedom, one expressed through bodily performances, familial relationships, cultivation of the land, and sacred worship.Attending to the hidden linkages among intimate realms and the public sphere, Sheller explores specific struggles for freedom, including women's political activism in Jamaica; the role of discourses of "manhood" in the making of free subjects, soldiers, and citizens; the fiercely ethnonationalist discourses that excluded South Asian and African indentured workers; the sexual politics of the low-bass beats and "bottoms up" moves in the dancehall; and the struggle for reproductive and LGBT rights and against homophobia in the contemporary Caribbean. Through her creative use of archival sources and emphasis on the connections between intimacy, violence, and citizenship, Sheller enriches critical theories of embodied freedom, sexual citizenship, and erotic agency in all post-slavery societies.
82234953197808223495321
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Communist Councilman from HarlemBenjamin J. Davis
International Publishers Co
1991
Original Foreword by Henry Winston. Introduction by Simon W. Gerson for this new edition of Ben Davis's 1960s book. Written while Ben Davis served prison time for a Smith Act conviction later ruled unconstitutional. Index. Notes.
71780680497807178068051
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CONFRONTING AUTHORITYDerrick BellBeacon Press1996
Describing a protest at Harvard that cost him his tenuredposition, the author tells stories about others who have challengedauthority and examines the value of protest in protecting one's senseof self-worth. Reprint. NYT. K. PW.
080700927X
97808070092771
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Conscripts of Modernity: The Tragedy of Colonial EnlightenmentDavid Scott
Duke University Press Books
2004
At this stalled and disillusioned juncture in postcolonial history—when many anticolonial utopias have withered into a morass of exhaustion, corruption, and authoritarianism—David Scott argues the need to reconceptualize the past in order to reimagine a more usable future. He describes how, prior to independence, anticolonialists narrated the transition from colonialism to postcolonialism as romance—as a story of overcoming and vindication, of salvation and redemption. Scott contends that postcolonial scholarship assumes the same trajectory, and that this imposes conceptual limitations. He suggests that tragedy may be a more useful narrative frame than romance. In tragedy, the future does not appear as an uninterrupted movement forward, but instead as a slow and sometimes reversible series of ups and downs.Scott explores the political and epistemological implications of how the past is conceived in relation to the present and future through a reconsideration of C. L. R. James’s masterpiece of anticolonial history, The Black Jacobins, first published in 1938. In that book, James told the story of Toussaint L’Ouverture and the making of the Haitian Revolution as one of romantic vindication. In the second edition, published in the United States in 1963, James inserted new material suggesting that that story might usefully be told as tragedy. Scott uses James’s recasting of The Black Jacobins to compare the relative yields of romance and tragedy. In an epilogue, he juxtaposes James’s thinking about tragedy, history, and revolution with Hannah Arendt’s in On Revolution. He contrasts their uses of tragedy as a means of situating the past in relation to the present in order to derive a politics for a possible future.
82233444597808223344461
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Critical Theorists and International Relations (Interventions)Jenny Edkins (Editor)Routledge2009
A wide range of critical theorists is used in the study of international politics, and until now there has been no text that gives concise and accessible introductions to these figures. Critical Theorists and International Relations provides a wide-ranging introduction to thirty-two important theorists whose work has been influential in thinking about global politics.Each chapter is written by an expert with a detailed knowledge of the theorist concerned, representing a range of approaches under the rubric ‘critical’, including Marxism and post-Marxism, the Frankfurt School, hermeneutics, phenomenology, postcolonialism, feminism, queer theory, poststructuralism, pragmatism, scientific realism, deconstruction and psychoanalysis.Key features of each chapter include:a clear and concise biography of the relevant thinkeran introduction to their key writings and ideasa summary of the ways in which these ideas have influenced and are being used in international relations scholarshipa list of suggestions for further reading Written in engaging and accessible prose, Critical Theorists and International Relations is a unique and invaluable resource for undergraduates, postgraduates and scholars of international relations.
41547466397804154746651
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DAK'ART 2006: 7e me biennale de l'art africain contemporainYacouba Konate20061
45
DAK'ART 2014: 11e biennale de l'art africain Contemporain
Elise Atangana, Smooth Ugochukwu Nzewi, Abdelkader Damani
20141
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Dangerous SupplementsPeter Fitzpatrick
Duke University Press
1991
In Dangerous Supplements expert legal scholars employing a variety of theoretical perspectives—feminism, poststructuralism, semiotics, and Marxism—challenge predominating views in jurisprudence. Prevailing notions of the nature of the law, they argue, have failed to recognize the law’s dependence on social constructs and the indeterminance of language. The contributors further claim that proponents of traditional notions have borrowed knowledge from other fields, only to reject that knowledge as ultimately subversive and dangerous in its ramifications. Taking as a point of departure H. L. A. Hart’s The Concept of the Law, Peter Fitzgerald shows how Hart adopted Wittgenstein’s linguistic theory to overthrow J. L. Austin’s “simple” conception of rules and habits in law, only to jettison this theory in order to locate the essence of law in its evolution from a “primal scene.” Other chapters examine the way in which the setting of English law above social relations has masked an imperial mission; how the philosophies of Hayek and Marx, as well as the discourses of liberalism, feminism, semiotics, and poststructuralism, have been assiduously marginalized and rendered inessential to jurisprudence.
82231121697808223112181
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Darkwater: Voices from Within the Veil (Dover Thrift Editions)W. E. B. Du BoisDover Publications1999
The distinguished American civil rights leader, W. E. B. Du Bois first published these fiery essays, sketches, and poems individually nearly 80 years ago in the Atlantic, the Journal of Race Development, and other periodicals. Reflecting the author's ideas as a politician, historian, and artist, this volume has long moved and inspired readers with its militant cry for social, political, and economic reforms for black Americans. Essential reading for students of African-American history
48640890697804864089031
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Daughters of Caliban
Consuelo López Springfield (Editor)
Latin America Bureau
1997
Haitian women and "voodoo" healing; Cuban women in the midst of economic crisis; Jamaican women and the unspoken racism of beauty contests. These are just three of the dimensions of this multifaceted survey of contemporary Caribbean women. Looking at a region where race and gender play vital roles in forming cultural identity, this book explores a range of themes of interest to women. The essays mix sociology, economics and cultural studies to bring to life some of the most important issues facing the region's women. It analyzes the economic impact of globalization by looking at women's work in free-trade zones and inter-island trading. It examines health and the law, focusing on AIDS, folk medicine and legal discrimination, and the recurring cultural concerns in such fields as language, religion and music. Covering Cuba, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Guadeloupe and Puerto Rico as well as the Commonwealth Caribbean, this book reveals many of the common challenges facing women across the region. With contributions from a range of feminist scholars, from the Caribbean, North America and Europe, it offers an insight into women's thinking in a dynamic movement in the Caribbean's social development.
189936515X
97818993651591
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Death in Brazil, APeter RobbPicador2005
Deliciously sensuous and fascinating, Robb renders in vivid detail the intoxicating pleasures of Brazil’s food, music, literature, and landscape as he travels not only cross country but also back in time—from the days of slavery to modern day political intrigue and murder. Spellbinding and revelatory, Peter Robb paints a multi-layered portrait of Brazil as a country of intoxicating and passionate extremes.
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Decolonization: Perspectives from Now and Then (Rewriting Histories)Prasenjit DuaraRoutledge2003
Decolonization brings together the most cutting-edge thinking by major historians of decolonization, including previously unpublished essays and writings by leaders of decolonizing countries including Ho Chi-Minh and Jawaharlal Nehru. The chapters in this volume present a move away from Western analysis of decolonizaton and instead move towards the angle of vision of the former colonies. This is a ground-breaking study of a subject central to recent global history.
41524841897804152484191
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Disappeared and the Mothers of the Plaza: The Story of the 11,000 Argentinians Who Vanished, TheJohn Simpson,Jana BennettSt Martins Pr198531221229197803122122921
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Du Bois: Writings (Library of America College Editions)W. E. B. Du BoisLibrary of America1996
Historian, sociologist, novelist, editor, and political activist, William Edward Burghardt Du Bois was the most gifted and influential black intellectual of his time. Here are his essential writings, spanning a long, restless life dedicated to the struggle for racial justice. "The Suppression of the African Slave-Trade" recounts how Americans tolerated the traffic in human beings until taught by bloody civil war the consequences of moral cowardice; the essays in "The Souls of Black Folk" celebrate the strength and pride of black America, pay tribute to black music and religion, assess the career of Booker T. Washington, remember the death of an infant son; the autobiography "Dusk of Dawn" moves from a Massachusetts boyhood to the founding of the N.A.A.C.P. and emerging Pan-African consciousness. Essays and speeches from 1890 to 1958--angry and satiric, proud and mournful--show Du Bois at his freshest and most trenchant.
188301131097818830113141
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Du Bois's Black Reconstruction: Past and PresentThavolia Glymph (Editor)
Duke University Press
20131
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East Is Black: Cold War China in the Black Radical Imagination, TheRobeson Taj Frazier
Duke University Press Books
2014
During the Cold War, several prominent African American radical activist-intellectuals—including W.E.B. and Shirley Graham Du Bois, journalist William Worthy, Marxist feminist Vicki Garvin, and freedom fighters Mabel and Robert Williams—traveled and lived in China. There, they used a variety of media to express their solidarity with Chinese communism and to redefine the relationship between Asian struggles against imperialism and black American movements against social, racial, and economic injustice. In The East Is Black, Taj Frazier examines the ways in which these figures and the Chinese government embraced the idea of shared struggle against U.S. policies at home and abroad. He analyzes their diverse cultural output (newsletters, print journalism, radio broadcasts, political cartoons, lectures, and documentaries) to document how they imagined communist China’s role within a broader vision of a worldwide anticapitalist coalition against racism and imperialism.
82235786097808223578651
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Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America's UniversitiesCraig Steven WilderBloomsbury Press2014
A 2006 report commissioned by Brown University revealed that institution's complex and contested involvement in slavery—setting off a controversy that leapt from the ivory tower to make headlines across the country. But Brown's troubling past was far from unique. In Ebony and Ivy, Craig Steven Wilder, a leading historian of race in America, lays bare uncomfortable truths about race, slavery, and the American academy.Many of America's revered colleges and universities—from Harvard, Yale, and Princeton to Rutgers, Williams College, and the University of North Carolina—were soaked in the sweat, the tears, and sometimes the blood of people of color. The earliest academies proclaimed their mission to Christianize the “savages” of North America and played a key role in white conquest. Later, the slave economy and higher education grew up together, each nurturing the other. Slavery funded colleges, built campuses, and paid the wages of professors. Enslaved Americans waited on faculty and students; academic leaders aggressively courted the support of slave owners and slave traders. Significantly, as Wilder shows, our leading universities were dependent on human bondage and became breeding grounds for the racist ideas that sustained it.Ebony and Ivy is a powerful and propulsive study and the first of its kind, revealing a history of oppression behind the institutions usually considered the cradle of liberal politics.
160819402797816081940251
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Einstein's Cosmos: How Albert Einstein's Vision Transformed Our Understanding of Space and TimeMichio Kaku
Phoenix (an Imprint of The Ori
2005
In paperback for the centenary of the discovery of relativity, "a fresh and highly visual tour through Einstein's astonishing legacy" (Brian Greene). The year 2005 marks the 100th anniversary of the publication of the paper that launched Einstein's career, made E=mc2 famous, and ushered in a revolution in science―the paper that announced the theory of special relativity. And there's no better short book that explains just what Einstein did than Einstein's Cosmos. Keying Einstein's crucial discoveries to the simple mental images that inspired them, Michio Kaku finds a revealing new way to discuss these ideas, and delivers an appealing and always accessible introduction to Einstein's work.
075381904X
97807538190431
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Ella Baker and the Black Freedom Movement: A Radical Democratic Vision (Gender and American Culture)Barbara Ransby
The University of North Carolina Press
2005
One of the most important African American leaders of the twentieth century and perhaps the most influential woman in the civil rights movement, Ella Baker (1903-1986) was an activist whose remarkable career spanned fifty years and touched thousands of lives. A gifted grassroots organizer, Baker shunned the spotlight in favor of vital behind-the-scenes work that helped power the black freedom struggle. She was a national officer and key figure in the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, one of the founders of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and a prime mover in the creation of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. Baker made a place for herself in predominantly male political circles that included W. E. B. DuBois, Thurgood Marshall, and Martin Luther King Jr., all the while maintaining relationships with a vibrant group of women, students, and activists both black and white. In this deeply researched biography, Barbara Ransby chronicles Baker's long and rich political career as an organizer, an intellectual, and a teacher, from her early experiences in depression-era Harlem to the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s. Ransby shows Baker to be a complex figure whose radical, democratic worldview, commitment to empowering the black poor, and emphasis on group-centered, grassroots leadership set her apart from most of her political contemporaries. Beyond documenting an extraordinary life, the book paints a vivid picture of the African American fight for justice and its intersections with other progressive struggles worldwide across the twentieth century.
80785616997808078561611
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Empire of Cotton: A New History of Global CapitalismSven BeckertAllen Lane2014
Hardcover Publisher: Allen Lane (December 4, 2014) Language: English ISBN-10: 024101171X ISBN-13: 978-0241011713 Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 1.6 x 9.4 inches Shipping Weight: 2.3 pounds
024101171X
97802410117131
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Eurocentrism: Modernity, Religion and Democracy - A Critique of Eurocentrism and CulturalismSamir AminPambazuka Press2010
Since its first publication twenty years ago, Eurocentrism has become a classic of radical thought. Written by one of the world's foremost political economists, this original and provocative essay takes on one of the great 'ideological deformations' of our time: Eurocentrism. Rejecting the dominant Eurocentric view of world history, which narrowly and incorrectly posits a progression from the Greek and Roman classical world to Christian feudalism and the European capitalist system, Amin presents a sweeping reinterpretation that emphasises the crucial historical role played by the Arab Islamic world. Throughout the work, Amin addresses a broad set of concerns, ranging from the ideological nature of scholastic metaphysics to the meanings and shortcomings of contemporary Islamic fundamentalism. This second edition contains a new introduction and concluding chapter, both of which make the author's arguments even more compelling.
190638778897819063877851
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Five Lectures: Psychoanalysis, Politics and UtopiaHerbert MarcuseBeacon Press197080701549097808070154901
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From Toussaint to Tupac: The Black International since the Age of Revolution
Michael O. West (Editor), William G. Martin (Editor), Fanon Che Wilkins (Editor)
The University of North Carolina Press
2009
Transcending geographic and cultural lines, From Toussaint to Tupac is an ambitious collection of essays exploring black internationalism and its implications for a black consciousness. At its core, black internationalism is a struggle against oppression, whether manifested in slavery, colonialism, or racism. The ten essays in this volume offer a comprehensive overview of the global movements that define black internationalism, from its origins in the colonial period to the present.From Toussaint to Tupac focuses on three moments in global black history: the American and Haitian revolutions, the Garvey movement and the Communist International following World War I, and the Black Power movement of the late twentieth century. Contributors demonstrate how black internationalism emerged and influenced events in particular localities, how participants in the various struggles communicated across natural and man-made boundaries, and how the black international aided resistance on the local level, creating a collective consciousness.In sharp contrast to studies that confine Black Power to particular national locales, this volume demonstrates the global reach and resonance of the movement. The volume concludes with a discussion of hip hop, including its cultural and ideological antecedents in Black Power.Contributors:Hakim Adi, Middlesex University, LondonSylvia R. Frey, Tulane UniversityWilliam G. Martin, Binghamton UniversityBrian Meeks, University of the West Indies, Mona, JamaicaMarc D. Perry, University of Illinois, Urbana-ChampaignLara Putnam, University of PittsburghVijay Prashad, Trinity CollegeRobyn Spencer, Lehman CollegeRobert T. Vinson, College of William and MaryMichael O. West, Binghamton UniversityFanon Che Wilkins, Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan
80785972997808078597281
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Funkaesthetics
Luis Jacob,Adrian Piper,Pan Wendt,Justina M. Barnicke Gallery Staff (Contribution by),Confederation Centre of the Arts Staff (Contribution by)
University of Toronto Press
200977276075697807727607531
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George Padmore
Fitzroy Baptiste (Editor),Lewis (Editor)
Ian Randle Publishers
2000
In a life that spanned a little over half a century, Trinidadian George Padmore, the militant revolutionary, political thinker and anti-colonial champion, contributed significantly to laying the foundation of a movement which would act as a catalyst for the independence of states across Africa and the Caribbean. Coming out of a 2003 conference marking the centenary of Padmore's birth, the articles in this collection highlight and explore in unique ways, the varying facets of Padmore. His development from student activist to political figure under the watchful eye of C.L.R. James, his role as journalist and organizer and the friendships formed on the path to black liberation, all come under examination. In studying Padmore, the contributions in this volume go further than the individual by contextualizing the struggle of which he was a part and dedicated his life to.
976637350797897663735041
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Global Politics: A New Introduction
Jenny Edkins (Editor), Maja Zehfuss (Editor)
Routledge2009
Global Politics:A New Introduction is an innovative new textbook that provides a completely original way of teaching and learning about world politics. The book engages directly with the issues in global politics that students are most interested in, helping them to understand the key questions and theories and also to develop a critical and inquiring perspective. Key features of Global Politics: A New Introduction:Examines the most significant issues in global politics – from war, peacebuilding, terrorism, security and authority to poverty, development, postcolonialism, human rights, gender, inequality, ethnicity and what we can do to change the world Each chapter is written to a common structure which is ideal for teaching and learning and features a key question, an illustrative example, general responses and larger issues Integrates theory and practice throughout the text, by presenting theoretical ideas and concepts in conjunction with a global range of historical and contemporary case studiesDraws on theoretical perspectives from a broad range of disciplines including international relations, political theory, postcolonial studies, sociology, geography, peace studies, developmentExtensively illustrated throughout with 169 maps, photos, figures and cartoons as well as extensive pedagogic features to further learning, including a support website which provides podcast interviews with contributors, weblinks and downloadable maps Features an international line-up of leading scholars. Global Politics: A New Introduction is an original, groundbreaking, engaged and intellectually stimulating textbook for core courses on world politics, international politics and international relations.
041543131X
97804154313161
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Governing Sound: The Cultural Politics of Trinidad's Carnival Musics (Chicago Studies in Ethnomusicology)Jocelyne Guilbault
University Of Chicago Press
2007
Calypso music is an integral part of Trinidad’s national identity. When, for instance, Franklin D. Roosevelt asked the great Trinidadian musician Roaring Lion where he was from, Lion famously replied “the land of calypso.” But in a nation as diverse as Trinidad, why is it that calypso has emerged as the emblematic music?In Governing Sound, Jocelyne Guilbault examines the conditions that have enabled calypso to be valorized, contested, and targeted as a field of cultural politics in Trinidad. The prominence of calypso, Guilbault argues, is uniquely enmeshed in projects of governing and in competing imaginations of nation, race, and diaspora. During the colonial regime, the period of national independence, and recent decades of neoliberal transformation, calypso and its musical offshoots have enabled new cultural formations while simultaneously excluding specific social expressions, political articulations, and artistic traditions. Drawing on over a decade of ethnographic work, Guilbault maps the musical journeys of Trinidad’s most prominent musicians and arrangers and explains the distinct ways their musical sensibilities became audibly entangled with modes of governing, audience demands, and market incentives.Generously illustrated and complete with an accompanying CD, Governing Sound constitutes the most comprehensive study to date of Trinidad’s carnival musics.
22631060497802263106021
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Half Has Never Been Told, TheEdward E. Baptist2016
Americans tend to cast slavery as a pre-modern institution--the nation’s original sin, perhaps, but isolated in time and divorced from America’s later success. But to do so robs the millions who suffered in bondage of their full legacy. As historian Edward Baptist reveals in The Half Has Never Been Told, the expansion of slavery in the first eight decades after American independence drove the evolution and modernization of the United States. In the span of a single lifetime, the South grew from a narrow coastal strip of worn-out tobacco plantations to a continental cotton empire, and the United States grew into a modern, industrial, and capitalist economy. Until the Civil War, Baptist explains, the most important American economic innovations were ways to make slavery ever more profitable. Through forced migration and torture, slave owners extracted continual increases in efficiency from enslaved African Americans. Thus the United States seized control of the world market for cotton, the key raw material of the Industrial Revolution, and became a wealthy nation with global influence. Told through intimate slave narratives, plantation records, newspapers, and the words of politicians, entrepreneurs, and escaped slaves, The Half Has Never Been Told offers a radical new interpretation of American history. It forces readers to reckon with the violence at the root of American supremacy, but also with the survival and resistance that brought about slavery’s end--and created a culture that sustains America’s deepest dreams of freedom.
46504966497804650496601
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Heidegger's Children: Hannah Arendt, Karl Lowith, Hans Jonas, and Herbert MarcuseRichard Wolin
Princeton University Press
2003
Martin Heidegger is perhaps the twentieth century's greatest philosopher, and his work stimulated much that is original and compelling in modern thought. A seductive classroom presence, he attracted Germany's brightest young intellects during the 1920s. Many were Jews, who ultimately would have to reconcile their philosophical and, often, personal commitments to Heidegger with his nefarious political views. In 1933, Heidegger cast his lot with National Socialism. He squelched the careers of Jewish students and denounced fellow professors whom he considered insufficiently radical. For years, he signed letters and opened lectures with "Heil Hitler" He paid dues to the Nazi party until the bitter end. Equally problematic for his former students were his sordid efforts to make existential thought serviceable to Nazi ends and his failure to ever renounce these actions. This book explores how four of Heidegger's most influential Jewish students came to grips with his Nazi association and how it affected their thinking. Hannah Arendt, who was Heidegger's lover as well as his student, went on to become one of the century's greatest political thinkers. Karl Löwith returned to Germany in 1953 and quickly became one of its leading philosophers. Hans Jonas grew famous as Germany's premier philosopher of environmentalism. Herbert Marcuse gained celebrity as a Frankfurt School intellectual and mentor to the New Left. Why did these brilliant minds fail to see what was in Heidegger's heart and Germany's future? How would they, after the war, reappraise Germany's intellectual traditions? Could they salvage aspects of Heidegger's thought? Would their philosophy reflect or completely reject their early studies? Could these Heideggerians forgive, or even try to understand, the betrayal
069111479X
97806911147981
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Hollow Land: Israel's Architecture of OccupationEyal WeizmanVerso2007
Hollow Land is a groundbreaking exploration of the political space created by Israel’s colonial occupation.In this journey from the deep subterranean spaces of the West Bank and Gaza to their militarized airspace, Eyal Weizman unravels Israel’s mechanisms of control and its transformation of the Occupied Territories into a theoretically constructed artifice, in which all natural and built features function as the weapons and ammunition with which the conflict is waged. Weizman traces the development of these ideas, from the influence of archaeology on urban planning, Ariel Sharon’s reconceptualization of military defense during the 1973 war, through the planning and architecture of the settlements, to contemporary Israeli discourse and practice of urban warfare and airborne targeted assassinations.In exploring Israel’s methods to transform the landscape and the built environment themselves into tools of domination and control, Hollow Land lays bare the political system at the heart of this complex and terrifying project of late-modern colonial occupation.
184467125997818446712501
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Horizontalism: Voices of Popular Power in ArgentinaMarina Sitrin (Editor)AK Press2006
Chosen by Rebecca Solnit for her "Secret Library of Hope: 12 Books to Stiffen Your Resolve" (Dec. 2007).“The movements in Argentina have been among the most creative and inspirational in recent years. Marina Sitrin’s collection allows us to learn from the activists themselves and continue the experiments in autonomy and democracy they have begun.”—Michael Hardt, co-author of Empire“...a fascinating account about what is fresh and new about the Argentine uprising.”—John Holloway, author of Change the World Without Taking PowerThe popular rebellion that began in December 2001 in Argentina with the IMF melt-down and subsequent capital flight sparked a process of creativity that continues to this day. Different from so many social movements of the past, this rebellion rejects political programs, opting instead to create directly democratic spaces on street corners, in factories, and throughout neighborhoods. Many have come to call this new social relationship, “horizontalidad.” Horizontalism is an oral history of the exciting transformations taking place since the popular rebellion. It is a story of cooperation, vision, creation and discovery. It is a history told by people in the various autonomous social movements, from the occupied factories, neighborhood assemblies, arts and independent media collectives, to the indigenous communities and unemployed workers movements. Marina Sitrin is a New York City-based lawyer, writer, and activist who has spent large portions of the past three years in Argentina. Her work has appeared in Left Turn and Perspectives.
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House That Race Built: Original Essays by Toni Morrison, Angela Y. Davis, Cornel West, and Others on Black Americans and Politics in America Today, TheWahneema Lubiano (Editor)Vintage1998Essays on politics and race67976068797806797606891
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I Put A Spell On You: The Autobiography Of Nina SimoneNina SimoneDa Capo Press2003
A gorgeous, inimitable singer and songwriter, Nina Simone (1933-2003) changed the face of both music and race relations in America. She struck a chord with bluesy jazz ballads like "Put a Little Sugar in My Bowl" and powerful protest songs such as "Mississippi Goddam" and "To Be Young, Gifted, and Black," the anthem of the American Civil Rights movement. Coinciding with the re-release of her famous Philips Recordings, here are the reflections of the "High Priestess of Soul" on her own life.
30681327097803068132761
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In My Own Way: An AutobiographyAlan W. WattsNew World Library2007
In this new edition of his acclaimed autobiography — long out of print and rare until now — Alan Watts tracks his spiritual and philosophical evolution from a child of religious conservatives in rural England to a freewheeling spiritual teacher who challenged Westerners to defy convention and think for themselves. From early in this intellectual life, Watts shows himself to be a philosophical renegade and wide-ranging autodidact who came to Buddhism through the teachings of Christmas Humphreys and D. T. Suzuki. Told in a nonlinear style, In My Own Way wonderfully combines Watts’ own brand of unconventional philosophy and often hilarious accounts of gurus, celebrities, psychedelic drug experiences, and wry observations of Western culture. A charming foreword written by Watts’ father sets the tone of this warm, funny, and beautifully written story of a compelling figure who encouraged readers to “follow your own weird” — something he always did himself, as his remarkable account of his life shows.
157731584797815773158411
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In Search of the Black Fantastic: Politics and Popular Culture in the Post-Civil Rights Era (Transgressing Boundaries: Studies in Black Politics and Black Communities)Richard Iton
Oxford University Press, USA
2010
Prior to the 1960s, when African Americans had little access to formal political power, black popular culture was commonly seen as a means of forging community and effecting political change.But as Richard Iton shows in this provocative and insightful volume, despite the changes brought about by the civil rights movement, and contrary to the wishes of those committed to narrower conceptions of politics, black artists have continued to play a significant role in the making and maintenance of critical social spaces. Iton offers an original portrait of the relationship between popular culture and institutionalized politics tracing the connections between artists such as Paul Robeson, Lorraine Hansberry, Richard Pryor, Bob Marley, and Erykah Badu and those individuals working in the protest, electoral, and policy making arenas. With an emphasis on questions of class, gender and sexuality-and diaspora and coloniality-the author also illustrates how creative artists destabilize modern notions of the proper location of politics, and politics itself. Ranging from theater to film, and comedy to literature and contemporary music, In Search of the Black Fantastic is an engaging and sophisticated examination of how black popular culture has challenged our understandings of the aesthetic and its relationship to politics.
19973360097801997336061
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International and Cross-Cultural Management Studies
Robert Westwood,Jack Gavin
Palgrave Macmillan2009
Drawing on postcolonial theory this text offers a critique of international management. It argues that such disciplines are Western discourses and exhibit historical and current resonances with the vicissitudes of the so called 'colonial project'. The book explores alternative approaches to the question of the 'other' in late global capitalism.
140394617597814039461711
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Inward Hunger: The Education of a Prime MinisterEric WilliamsAndre Deutsch1969
This is the first paperback edition of the autobiography of the first Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago. When the author, the Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago, was a lad, his country was a British Crown Colony, and its government offered one university scholarship a year to the entire population. Young Williams won it, and went off to Oxford to study history and politics. He became an authority on West Indian history and, back home, founded the People's National Movement Party, which has repeatedly returned him to office. Mr. Williams' education has endowed him with a lucid style and, despite his dedication to his homeland, a mind that is anything but insular. This autobiography has become a classic in African-Caribbean history.
23396345697802339634571
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KindredOctavia E. Butler
Headline Book Publishing
2014
On her 26th birthday, Dana and her husband are moving into their apartment when she starts to feel dizzy. She falls to her knees, nauseous. Then the world falls away. She finds herself at the edge of a green wood by a vast river. A child is screaming. Wading into the water, she pulls him to safety, only to find herself face to face with a very old looking rifle, in the hands of the boy's father. She's terrified. The next thing she knows she's back in her apartment, soaking wet. It's the most terrifying experience of her life ...until it happens again. The longer Dana spends in 19th century Maryland - a very dangerous place for a black woman - the more aware she is that her life might be over before it's even begun.
147221481197814722148121
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Kindred (Black Women Writers Series)Octavia E. ButlerBeacon Press1988
Dana, a modern black woman, is celebrating her twenty-sixth birthday with her new husband when she is snatched abruptly from her home in California and transported to the antebellum South. With more than 100,000 copies in print, Kindred is a classic timetravel novel by an acclaimed African-American science fictionwriter.
80708305497808070830551
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Liberated Territory: Untold Local Perspectives on the Black Panther Party
Yohuru Williams (Editor),Jama Lazerow (Editor)
Duke University Press Books
2009
With their collection In Search of the Black Panther Party, Yohuru Williams and Jama Lazerow provided a broad analysis of the Black Panther Party and its legacy. In Liberated Territory, they turn their attention to local manifestations of the organization, far away from the party’s Oakland headquarters. This collection’s contributors, all historians, examine how specific party chapters and offshoots emerged, developed, and waned, as well as how the local branches related to their communities and to the national party.The histories and character of the party branches vary as widely as their locations. The Cape Verdeans of New Bedford, Massachusetts, were initially viewed as a particular challenge for the local Panthers but later became the mainstay of the Boston-area party. In the early 1970s, the Winston-Salem, North Carolina, chapter excelled at implementing the national Black Panther Party’s strategic shift from revolutionary confrontation to mainstream electoral politics. In Detroit, the Panthers were defined by a complex relationship between their above-ground activities and an underground wing dedicated to armed struggle. While the Milwaukee chapter was born out of a rising tide of black militancy, it ultimately proved more committed to promoting literacy and health care and redressing hunger than to violence. The Alabama Black Liberation Front did not have the official imprimatur of the national party, but it drew heavily on the Panthers’ ideas and organizing strategies, and its activism demonstrates the broad resonance of many of the concerns articulated by the national party: the need for jobs, for decent food and housing, for black self-determination, and for sustained opposition to police brutality against black people. Liberated Territory reveals how the Black Panther Party’s ideologies, goals, and strategies were taken up and adapted throughout the United States.Contributors: Devin Fergus, Jama Lazerow, Ahmad A. Rahman, Robert W. Widell Jr., Yohuru Williams
82234326697808223432641
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Lilith's BroodOctavia E. Butler
Grand Central Publishing
2000
The acclaimed trilogy that comprises LILITH'S BROOD is multiple Hugo and Nebula award-winner Octavia E. Butler at her best. Presented for the first time in one volume, with an introduction by Joan Slonczewski, Ph.D., LILITH'S BROOD is a profoundly evocative, sensual -- and disturbing -- epic of human transformation.Lilith Iyapo is in the Andes, mourning the death of her family, when war destroys Earth. Centuries later, she is resurrected -- by miraculously powerful unearthly beings, the Oankali. Driven by an irresistible need to heal others, the Oankali are rescuing our dying planet by merging genetically with mankind. But Lilith and all humanity must now share the world with uncanny, unimaginably alien creatures: their own children. This is their story...
44667610197804466761061
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Living For Change: An AutobiographyGrace Lee Boggs
Univ Of Minnesota Press
1998Book by Boggs, Grace Lee81662955297808166295581
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Lonely Crusade (Classic reprint series), TheChester B. Himes
Thunder's Mouth Pr
1986
Originally published in 1947, this story deals with the efforts of college-educated Lee Gordon to unionize the small black workforce at an aircraft factory during World War II. He discovers he is being manipulated by white union officials, the Communists, white women and by his bosses.
93841037797809384103791
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Long Way From HomeClaude McKayMariner Books1970
McKay's account of his long odyssey from Jamaica to Harlem and then on to France, Britain, North Africa, Russia, and finally back to America. As well as depicting his own experiences, the author describes his encounters with such notable personalities asCharlie Chaplin, George Bernard Shaw, H. G. Wells, Leon Trotsky, W. E. B. Du Bois, Isadora Duncan, Paul Robeson, and Sinclair Lewis.
15653145397801565314501
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Made in Indonesia: Indonesian Workers Since SuhartoDan La BotzSouth End Press2001
In Reform or Revolution? independent researcher Dan La Botz gives us a personal look at the Indonesian workers who are taking on global corporate giants and igniting a multinational labor solidarity movement.Through rare personal interviews with Indonesian workers, La Botz describes the inspiring, powerful events that are transforming the world's fourth-largest country. He shows us how workers earning the equivalent of $2 a day are challenging the sweatshop conditions of factories run by U.S.-based multinationals such as Nike and Reebok. Their dynamic new labor movement emerged in Indonesia in the 1990s, helping to bring down the brutal dictatorship of the U.S.-backed General Suharto in May 1998.When Indonesian workers toured U.S. campuses and trade union halls in 1999 and 2000, a new generation of student activists in the United States was awakened. Reform or Revolution? will be required reading for those activists and for all those interested in building international labor solidarity.Dan La Botz is a researcher and organizer with Global Exchange and currently lives in Cincinnati, Ohio. He is the author of Mask of Democracy and Democracy in Mexico, both published by South End Press, and Rank-and-File Rebellion. La Botz is the editor of Mexican Labor News and Analysis. His writing appears regularly in Against the Current, Labor Notes, and Z Magazine. He has traveled to Indonesia several times to report on the Indonesian labor movement.
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Making of New World Slavery: From the Baroque to the Modern 1492-1800, TheRobin BlackburnVerso1998
At the time when European powers colonized the Americas, the institution of slavery had almost disappeared from Europe itself. Having overcome an institution widely regarded as oppressive, why did they sponsor the construction of racial slavery in their new colonies?Robin Blackburn traces European doctrines of race and slavery from medieval times to the early modern epoch, and finds that the stigmatization of the ethno-religious Other was given a callous twist by a new culture of consumption, freed from an earlier moral economy.The Making of New World Slavery argues that independent commerce, geared to burgeoning consumer markets, was the driving force behind the rise of plantation slavery. The baroque state sought—successfully—to batten on this commerce, and—unsuccessfully—to regulate slavery and race. Successive chapters of the book consider the deployment of slaves in the colonial possessions of the Portuguese, the Spanish, the Dutch, the English and the French. Each are shown to have contributed something to the eventual consolidation of racial slavery and to the plantation revolution of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. It is shown that plantation slavery emerged from the impulses of civil society rather than from the strategies of the individual states.Robin Blackburn argues that the organization of slave plantations placed the West on a destructive path to modernity and that greatly preferable alternatives were both proposed and rejected. Finally he shows that the surge of Atlantic trade, premised on the killing toil of the plantations, made a decisive contribution to both the Industrial Revolution and the rise of the West.
185984195397818598419521
85
Minty AlleyC. L. R. JamesNew Beacon19751
86
Mobilizing India: Women, Music, and Migration Between India and TrinidadTejaswini Niranjana
Duke University Press
2006
Descendants of indentured laborers brought from India to the Caribbean between 1845 and 1917 comprise more than forty percent of Trinidad's population today. While many Indo-Trinidadians identify themselves as Indian, what "Indian" signifies--about nationalism, gender, culture, caste, race, and religion--in the Caribbean is different from what it means on the subcontinent. Yet the ways that "Indianness" is conceived of and performed in India and in Trinidad have historically been, and remain, intimately related. Offering an innovative analysis of how ideas of Indian identity negotiated within the Indian diaspora in Trinidad affect cultural identities "back home," Tejaswini Niranjana models a necessary project: comparative research across the global South, scholarship that decenters the "first world" West as the referent against which postcolonial subjects understand themselves and are understood by others. Niranjana draws on nineteenth-century travel narratives, anthropological and historical studies of Trinidad, Hindi film music, and the lyrics, performance, and reception of chutney-soca and calypso songs to argue that perceptions of Indian female sexuality in Trinidad have long been central to the formation and disruption of dominant narratives of nationhood, modernity, and normative sexuality in India. She illuminates debates in India about "the woman question" as they played out in the early-twentieth-century campaign against indentured servitude in the tropics. In so doing, she reveals India's disavowal of the indentured woman--viewed as morally depraved by her forced labor in Trinidad--as central to its own anticolonial struggle. Turning to the present, Niranjana looks to Trinidad's most dynamic site of cultural negotiation: popular music. She describes how contested ideas of Indian femininity are staged by contemporary Trinidadian musicians--male and female, of both Indian and African descent--in genres ranging from new hybrids like chutney-soca to the older but still vibrant music of Afro-Caribbean calypso.
82233842497808223384201
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Modern Caribbean, TheFranklin W. Knight
The University of North Carolina Press
1989
This collection of thirteen original essays by experts in the field of Caribbean studies clarifies the diverse elements that have shaped the modern Caribbean. Through an interdisciplinary examination of the complexities of race, politics, language, and environment that mark the region, the authors offer readers a thorough understanding of the Caribbean's history and culture.The essays also comment thoughtfully on the problems that confront the Caribbean in today's world.The essays focus on the Caribbean island and the mainland enclaves of Belize and the Guianas. Topics examined include the Haitian Revolution of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries; labor and society in the nineteenth-century Caribbean; society and culture in the British and French West Indies since 1870; identity, race, and black power in Jamaica; the "February Revolution" of 1970 in Trinidad; contemporary Puerto Rico; politics, economy, and society in twentieth-century Cuba; Spanish Caribbean politics and nationalism in the nineteenth century; Caribbean migrations; economic history of the British Caribbean; international relations; and nationalism, nation, and ideology in the evolution of Caribbean literature.The authors trace the historical roots of current Caribbean difficulties and analyze these problems in the light of economic, political, and social developments.Additionally, they explore these conditions in relation to United States interests and project what may lie ahead for the region. The challenges currently facing the Caribbean, note the editors, impose a heavy burden upon political leaders who must struggle "to eliminate the tensions when the people are so poor and their expectations so great."The contributors are Herman L. Bennett, Bridget Brereton, David Geggus, Franklin W. Knight, Anthony P.Maingot, Jay R. Mandle, Roberto M‡rquez, Teresita Mart'nez Vergne, Colin A. Palmer, Bonham C. Richardson, Franciso A. Scarano, and Blanca G. Silvestrini.
80784240097808078424091
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Moving the Centre (Studies in African Literature)Ngugi wa Thiong'oBOYE61993
In this collection Ngugi is concerned with moving the centre in two senses - between nations and within nations - in order to contribute to the freeing of world cultures from the restrictive walls of nationalism, class, race and genderBetween nations the need is to move the centre from its assumed location in the West to a multiplicity of spheres in all the cultures of the world. Within nations the move should be away from all minority class establishments to the real creative centre among working people in conditions of racial, religious and gender equality.North America: Heinemann; Kenya: EAEP
085255530X
97808525553091
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Naija MarxismsAdam MayerPluto Press2016
Since the 1940s, Marxist thought has blossomed in Nigeria. The history of 'Naija Marxism' is also that of the country's labour movement, its feminist movement, its social thought and political economy. It has been the mainstay of party politics in the case of illegal Marxist party formations and legal anti-feudalist forces and in the NGO sector. Long gone are the days when Marxism meant imported pamphlets and a disconnected ideology.In Naija Marxisms, Adam Mayer argues that Marxism is alive and well in Nigeria. It includes pre-eminent thinkers such as Usman Tar and Edwin Madunagu who are currently espousing a Marxian political economy and providing a class-based approach in the country's mainstream media channels.Drawn from years of research in Nigeria and elsewhere, Naija Marxisms breaks new ground in tracing the historical trajectories that leftist movements underwent since the 1940s. Mayer explores the international context of Nigerian Marxism and provides core chapters on key thinkers including Mokwugo Okoye, Ikenna Nzimiro and Eskor Toyo among many others.
74533657497807453365721
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New Centennial Review: W. E. B. Dubois and the Question of Another World (Volume 6, Number 3, Winter 2006), The
Scott Michaelson (Editor), David E. Johnson (Editor)
Michigan State University Press
20061
91
On the Postcolony (Studies on the History of Society and Culture)Achille Mbembe
University of California Press
2001
Achille Mbembe is one of the most brilliant theorists of postcolonial studies writing today. In On the Postcolony he profoundly renews our understanding of power and subjectivity in Africa. In a series of provocative essays, Mbembe contests diehard Africanist and nativist perspectives as well as some of the key assumptions of postcolonial theory.This thought-provoking and groundbreaking collection of essays—his first book to be published in English—develops and extends debates first ignited by his well-known 1992 article "Provisional Notes on the Postcolony," in which he developed his notion of the "banality of power" in contemporary Africa. Mbembe reinterprets the meanings of death, utopia, and the divine libido as part of the new theoretical perspectives he offers on the constitution of power. He works with the complex registers of bodily subjectivity — violence, wonder, and laughter — to profoundly contest categories of oppression and resistance, autonomy and subjection, and state and civil society that marked the social theory of the late twentieth century.This provocative book will surely attract attention with its signal contribution to the rich interdisciplinary arena of scholarship on colonial and postcolonial discourse, history, anthropology, philosophy, political science, psychoanalysis, and literary criticism.
52020435297805202043551
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Our Caribbean: A Gathering of Lesbian and Gay Writing from the AntillesThomas Glave (Editor)
Duke University Press Books
2008
The first book of its kind, Our Caribbean is an anthology of lesbian and gay writing from across the Antilles. The author and activist Thomas Glave has gathered outstanding fiction, nonfiction, memoir, and poetry by little-known writers together with selections by internationally celebrated figures such as José Alcántara Almánzar, Reinaldo Arenas, Dionne Brand, Michelle Cliff, Audre Lorde, Achy Obejas, and Assotto Saint. The result is an unprecedented literary conversation on gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered experiences throughout the Caribbean and its far-flung diaspora. Many selections were originally published in Spanish, Dutch, or creole languages; some are translated into English here for the first time.The thirty-seven authors hail from the Bahamas, Barbados, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Panama, Puerto Rico, St. Vincent, St. Kitts, Suriname, and Trinidad. Many have lived outside the Caribbean, and their writing depicts histories of voluntary migration as well as exile from repressive governments, communities, and families. Many pieces have a political urgency that reflects their authors’ work as activists, teachers, community organizers, and performers. Desire commingles with ostracism and alienation throughout: in the evocative portrayals of same-sex love and longing, and in the selections addressing religion, family, race, and class. From the poem “Saturday Night in San Juan with the Right Sailors” to the poignant narrative “We Came All the Way from Cuba So You Could Dress Like This?” to an eloquent call for the embrace of difference that appeared in the Nassau Daily Tribune on the eve of an anti-gay protest, Our Caribbean is a brave and necessary book.Contributors: José Alcántara Almánzar, Aldo Alvarez, Reinaldo Arenas, Rane Arroyo, Jesús J. Barquet, Marilyn Bobes, Dionne Brand, Timothy S. Chin, Michelle Cliff, Wesley E. A. Crichlow,Mabel Rodríguez Cuesta, Ochy Curiel, Faizal Deen, Pedro de Jesús, R. Erica Doyle, Thomas Glave,Rosamond S. King, Helen Klonaris, Lawrence La Fountain-Stokes, Audre Lorde, Shani Mootoo,Anton Nimblett, Achy Obejas, Leonardo Padura Fuentes, Virgilio Piñera, Patricia Powell, Kevin Everod Quashie, Juanita Ramos, Colin Robinson, Assotto Saint, Andrew Salkey, Lawrence Scott,Makeda Silvera, H. Nigel Thomas, Rinaldo Walcott, Gloria Wekker, Lawson Williams
8223422697808223422671
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Parable of the TalentsOctavia E. ButlerAspect2001
This Nebula Award-winning sequel to "Parable of the Sower" continues the story of Lauren Olamina in socially and economically depressed California in the 2030s. Convinced that her community should colonize the stars, Lauren and her followers make preparations. But the collapse of society and rise of fanatics result in Lauren's followers being enslaved, and her daughter stolen from her. Now, Lauren must fight back to save the new world order.
44661038097804466103841
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Pedagogies of Crossing: Meditations on Feminism, Sexual Politics, Memory, and the Sacred (Perverse Modernities)M. Jacqui Alexander
Duke University Press Books
2006
M. Jacqui Alexander is one of the most important theorists of transnational feminism working today. Pedagogies of Crossing brings together essays she has written over the past decade, uniting her incisive critiques, which have had such a profound impact on feminist, queer, and critical race theories, with some of her more recent work. In this landmark interdisciplinary volume, Alexander points to a number of critical imperatives made all the more urgent by contemporary manifestations of neoimperialism and neocolonialism. Among these are the need for North American feminism and queer studies to take up transnational frameworks that foreground questions of colonialism, political economy, and racial formation; for a thorough re-conceptualization of modernity to account for the heteronormative regulatory practices of modern state formations; and for feminists to wrestle with the spiritual dimensions of experience and the meaning of sacred subjectivity.In these meditations, Alexander deftly unites large, often contradictory, historical processes across time and space. She focuses on the criminalization of queer communities in both the United States and the Caribbean in ways that prompt us to rethink how modernity invents its own traditions; she juxtaposes the political organizing and consciousness of women workers in global factories in Mexico, the Caribbean, and Canada with the pressing need for those in the academic factory to teach for social justice; she reflects on the limits and failures of liberal pluralism; and she presents original and compelling arguments that show how and why transgenerational memory is an indispensable spiritual practice within differently constituted women-of-color communities as it operates as a powerful antidote to oppression. In this multifaceted, visionary book, Alexander maps the terrain of alternative histories and offers new forms of knowledge with which to mold alternative futures.
82233645697808223364571
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Philadelphia Negro: A Social Study, TheW. E. B. Du Bois
University of Pennsylvania Press
1995
In 1897 the promising young sociologist William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (1868-1963) was given a temporary post as Assistant in Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania in order to conduct in-depth studies of the Negro community in Philadelphia. The product of those studies was the first great empirical book on the Negro in American society.More than one hundred years after its original publication by the University of Pennsylvania Press, The Philadelphia Negro remains a classic work. It is the first, and perhaps still the finest, example of engaged sociological scholarship—the kind of work that, in contemplating social reality, helps to change it.In his introduction, Elijah Anderson examines how the neighborhood studied by Du Bois has changed over the years and compares the status of blacks today with their status when the book was initially published.
81221573797808122157311
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Postcolonial African Philosophy: A Critical Reader
Emmanuel Chukwudi Eze (Editor)
Wiley-Blackwell1997
Postcolonial African Philosophy: A Critical Readersets out a timely and powerful agenda for contemporary African, Afro-Caribbean, and African American philosophy.
63120340097806312034071
97
Problem of Slavery in Western Culture (Oxford Paperbacks), TheDavid Brion Davis
Oxford University Press
1988
Winner of several national awards including the 1967 Pulitzer Prize, this classic study by David Brion Davis has given new direction to the historical and sociological research of society's attitude towards slavery.Davis depicts the various ways different societies have responded to the intrinsic contradictions of slavery from antiquity to the early 1770's in order to establish the uniqueness of the abolitionists' response.While slavery has always caused considerable social and psychological tension, Western culture has associated it with certain religious and philosophical doctrines that gave it the highest sanction. The contradiction of slavery grew more profound when it became closely linked with American colonization, which had as its basic foundation the desire and opportunity to create a more perfect society.Davis provides a comparative analysis of slave systems in the Old World, a discussion of the early attitudes towards American slavery, and a detailed exploration of the early protests against Negro bondage, as well as the religious, literary, and philosophical developments that contributed to both sides in the controversies of the late eighteenth century. This exemplary introduction to the history of slavery in Western culture presents the traditions in thought and value that gave rise to the attitudes of both abolitionists and defenders of slavery in the late eighteenth century as well as the nineteenth century.
19505639697801950563961
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Quality of Hurt: The Early Years : The Autobiography of Chester Himes, TheChester B. HimesParagon House1990
Himes writes of black ghetto life and of his personal struggle with repressive American ways.
155778306397815577830661
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Quantum: A Guide for the PerplexedJim Al-Khalili
Phoenix (an Imprint of The Orion Publishing Group Ltd )
2012
From Schrodinger's cat to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, this book untangles the weirdness of the quantum world.Quantum mechanics underpins modern science and provides us with a blueprint for reality itself. And yet it has been said that if you're not shocked by it, you don't understand it. But is quantum physics really so unknowable? Is reality really so strange? And just how can cats be half-alive and half-dead at the same time?Our journey into the quantum begins with nature's own conjuring trick, in which we discover that atoms -- contrary to the rules of everyday experience -- can exist in two locations at once. To understand this we travel back to the dawn of the twentieth century and witness the birth of quantum theory, which over the next one hundred years was to overthrow so many of our deeply held notions about the nature of our universe. Scientists and philosophers have been left grappling with its implications every since.
178022395197817802239571
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Race & Class: Paradigms of Racism (Volume 37, #3, January-March 1996)A. Sivanandan19961
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