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1
A04027anon.The Disobedient Child1570well , For now I am ●onge , lyuely , and iustie, And welcome besydes to all
2
A03244Heywood, ThomasThe Rape of Lucrece 1607the appetite , Making the spirit able , strong and prone, Can such as these their
3
A19738anon.The Wars of Cyrus 1594a campe of men , So able , wise and venterousthey are , Doth rest for
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A19876Davenant, Sir WilliamThe Cruel Brother 1630of busie thoughts ; of plotts Abortiue , crude , and thinne. T'is cheape , and base For
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A53060_14Cavendish, Margaret1 Beauty, Love, and Wit1662
Eternall , and consequently infinite ; this
absolute , wise , and Eternalpower Man calls God ; but
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A18403Chapman, GeorgeBussy D'Ambois 1604at humours , that are more absurd , Childish and villanousthan that hackster , whore , Slaue
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A04648Jonson, BenEvery Man Out of His Humour1599is the most vile , foolish , absurd , palpable , and ridiculousEscutcheon that euer this eye
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A19260Cooke, JoshuaGreene's Tu Quoque, or The City Gallant 1614
compleate Gentleman , to a most
absurd ridiculous and fondlouer . Long . Oh , when a
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A18404_02Chapman, GeorgeThe Tragedy of Charles Duke of Byron1608that such a spirrit , So actiue , valiant , and vigilant; Can see it selfe transformed
10
A04648Jonson, BenEvery Man Out of His Humour1599sunne ) shee has the most acute , readie , and facetiouswit , that — tut there's no
11
A27177_18Fletcher-MassingerThe Prophetess 1625
runs my Commission . Suitor . An
admirable , zealous and trueJustice . 1 Lict. I cannot
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A27177_28Fletcher, JohnWomen Pleased 1625the mirrour of perfection : How admirable faire and delicate, And how it stirs me
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A09221Peele, GeorgeThe Battle of Alcazar 1589the Arabian Muly Hamet here , Aduenturous , bold , and fullof rich reward . Stuk . Braue
14
A53060_01Cavendish, Margaret1 Love's Adventures1662
obedienz , carefull , industrious , laborious , daring ,
adventurous , resolute , and active, in these Warrs , in this
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A02226_04Greville, FulkeAlaham1600
honours being but delights . Others
ambitious , rash , and violent, No inward strength of nature
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A47372_01Killigrew, ThomasThe Princess1636I am subject to grow angry , weak and drowsie. Crabb . Therefore you must master
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A07004_01Marlowe, Christopher1 Tamburlaine1587in greatest noueltie , And rest attmplesse faint and destitute? Me thinks we should not
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A12138Shirley, JamesThe Grateful Servant 1629my Lord . Duke , And as attractiue , great , and gloriouswomen Are there not , ha
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A11909_10Seneca, Lucius AnnaeusHerceules Oetaeus1581vs afraide ? Seeme wee so awfull , fell , and fierce? and wherefore are wee staide
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A53060_20Cavendish, MargaretThe Apocryphal Ladies1662whether it be Good or Bad , Lawfull or unlawfull, VVife or Concubine , 'tis all
21
A53060_10Cavendish, MargaretThe Unnatural Tragedy1662
to behave themselves like rude ,
barbarous , brutish and cruelmen , when he should have
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A47372_09Killigrew, Thomas2 Bellamira Her Dream1652thy faults ; Pollidor was never barbarous , rough and cruelare not Pollidor 's crimes
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A19182anon.
The Contention between Liberality and Prodigality
1601tall , Vpon a tyred asse , bare , short , and small. Host. O ho , 'tis Tenacity
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A21144anon.The Reign of King Edward the Third 1596our ouerthrow , Euen in the barraine , bleake and fruitlesseaire , Enter Dauid and Douglas
25
A15352Wilkins, GeorgeThe Miseries of Enforced Marriage 1607
Child , Without whom , she were
barren , faint , and wilde. They are the stems on
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A53060_08Cavendish, Margaret1 Wit's Cabal1662
Vain-glorious persons , to be unworthy ,
base , false , and wicked
. Exit . Vainglorious alone . Vain-glorious . She
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A50796Middleton, ThomasThe Spanish Gypsy 1623this Trade of Gipsying ( Being base , idle and slavish) offer you A state to
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A27203Fletcher, JohnThe Wild Goose Chase 1621
and fashions beggerly , and Bankrupt :
Base , old , and scurvy. Bel. How lookes her face
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A27177_18Fletcher-MassingerThe Prophetess 1625him be what he will ; base , old , or crooked, hee shall have Me : Nay
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A27177_12Ford, JohnThe Laws of Candy1647as good Princes ought ) Desies base indirect , and godlessetreacheries ; To your more Sacred
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A27177_28Fletcher, JohnWomen Pleased 1625contemne it ? If I were bashfull , old , or dull, and sleepy In Loves allarmes
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A27177_31Fletcher, JohnValentinian 1625me quickly , and proclaim What beastly , base , and cowardlycompanions , The Emperor has trusted
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A11909_04Seneca, Lucius AnnaeusHippolytus1581
and monstruous adultry . Whych her
beastly , vnchaste , and vndutifullpractise , hee dutifully loathinge , shee
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A27177_13Fletcher-MassingerThe Wandering Lovers1625well , if she be not beauteous . Clean . And curteoustoo . Enter Chamberlaine with wine
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A04653Jonson, BenCynthia's Revels1600
well : Very properly pursewd . Asot.
Beautifull , ambiguous , and sufficientLady . What are you all
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A53060_02Cavendish, Margaret2 Love's Adventures1662lived , for my wife was beautifull , chaste and cleanly, and I wished every man
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A53060_09Cavendish, Margaret2 Wit's Cabal1662choose a man that were blind , deaf , and dumb, that he might neither trouble
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A53060_21Cavendish, MargaretThe Female Academy1662are ; Nay , had we been blind , deaf , and insensibleto the Sex , we had
39
A18331Mabbe, JamesThe Spanish Bawd (Calisto and Meliboea) 1631
order & reason . They paint thee
blind , poore , and young; they put a Bowe into
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A47372_08Killigrew, Thomas1 Bellamira Her Dream1652below a common pity , cruel , blind , ungrateful and unkindPhillora . Phil. Oh Pollidor , Pollidor
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A10407Randolph, ThomasThe Jealous Lovers1632visit mortalls . Every thing is blithe , Jocund , and joviall. All the gods arrive To
42
A11152Rowley, WilliamA Shoemaker a Gentleman 1638his fall , The worke was bloody , rough , and Tragicall; And therefore for my love
43
A14875Webster, John(1)The White Devil1612where a satiety is a blunt , weary and drowsiepassion , if the buttery hatch
44
A10402Randolph, ThomasAristippus; The Conceited Pedlar 1630boone cheere To make one blyth , buxome and deboneere, 'Twill giue me such valour
45
A53060_11Cavendish, MargaretThe Wooers1662their discourse be barren or boggy , woody or rocky, yet their Wit will run
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A56843Quarles, FrancisThe Virgin Widow 1649I know that Mountebanks are bold , ignorant , and covetous; and when these three qualities
47
A04874Kirke, JohnThe Seven Champions of Christendom 1638a little first . Ormand be bold , secure , and free, Revell in arts strong potency
48
A59992_03Shirley, JamesThe Doubtful Heir1638
fellows Captain , As generous , as
bountifull , discreet , And valianttoo , as any boast themselves
49
A59992_03Shirley, JamesThe Doubtful Heir1638Noble in his Nature , Active , bountifull Discreet , and valiant, if we may believe What
50
A04652Jonson, BenThe Fortunate Isles and Their Union 1625not grill : Her face all bowsy , Droopie , and drowsie, Scuruy , and lowsie , Comely crinkled
51
A16923Brome, RichardThe Antipodes1640my Lords owne house ? Ioy. Brave , brave , and monstrous! Byp. Shee has not seene
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A77567_05Brome, RichardThe Queen and Concubine1659
like waves orecome each other .
Brave , wise , and valiantPetruccio ! That couldst so happily
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A03258Brome, RichardThe Late Lancashire Witches 1634well ? Rob. Yes sir , he's broad buttock'd and fullflanck'd , he doth not bate
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A04874Kirke, JohnThe Seven Champions of Christendom 1638titled , Base or Noble pray ? Calib . Base , and Nobletoo : Both base by thee
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A53060_17Cavendish, MargaretThe Comical Hash1662though it is an industrious , carefull , painfull , and dangerousProfession , yet it is a
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A06589Lyly, JohnEndymion1591iealous of my truth , but careles , suspicious , and secure: which strange humor maketh my
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A47372_05Killigrew, Thomas2 Cicilia and Clorinda1650every look , no Art , all careless , natural and unaffectedsweetness , yet graceful and pleasant
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A02800Haughton, WilliamEnglishmen for my money1616and seueritie May make them carelesse , mad , or desperate. What shall I doe ? Oh!
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A27177_30MiddletonWit at Several Weapons1613cozen , You cannot be too cautelous , nice , or dainty, In your society here , especially
60
A04636Jonson, BenThe Alchemist1612Water ; On th'other part , a certaine crasse , and viscousPortion of earth ; both which
61
A50795Middleton, ThomasNo Wit, No Help Like a Woman's 16114 o . 76. Flores Solitudinis , certaine rare and elegantpieces , viz. Two excellent discourses
62
A50407MayneThe Amorous War 1648more inflam'd to see a certaine true , And Genuinesmile creepe ●'re your N●tbrowne
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A19738anon.The Wars of Cyrus 1594man at armes , O Panthea chast vertuous and amiable, This office Cyrus to your
64
A06629Lyly, JohnThe Woman in the Moon 1593She shalbe louing liberall and chaste , Discreete and patient, mercifull and milde , Inspired with
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A53060_02Cavendish, Margaret2 Love's Adventures1662fire to my muse , being chaste , fair and vertuous, which are the chief theams
66
A53060_09Cavendish, Margaret2 Wit's Cabal1662keeps both man and wise chaste , patient , and healthful
, because gluttony , debauchery , and intemperate
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A53060_01Cavendish, Margaret1 Love's Adventures1662life is so innocent , harmless , chaste , pure and sweet, and your actions so just
68
A07077Marston, JohnParasitaster, or The Fawn 1604goes to embrace him , if cholericke , impatient or irefull, to haue a Mistresse withred
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A13358anon.The Taming of a Shrew 1594Faire louely lady , bright and Christalline , Bewteous and statelyas the eie-traind bird , As
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A20065Dekker, Thomas2 The Honest Whore1605Cand. In any thing that's ciuill , honest , and iust. Lod. Haue you euer a
71
A53060_04Cavendish, Margaret1 Youth's Glory and Death's Banquet1662War , for both the Theological , Civil , Common , and AccustomaryLaws , are protected by the
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A53060_20Cavendish, MargaretThe Apocryphal Ladies1662against , they are not so civil , dutifull , and obedientas they were , not considering
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A53060_05Cavendish, Margaret2 Youth's Glory and Death's Banquet1662and various winds , But noble , civil , kind and affectionateGentlemen , as I have told
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A77565_05Brome, RichardThe Damoiselle1639
since , But now grown wondrous
civill , free , and hospitable, Having had something fallen to
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A53060_01Cavendish, Margaret1 Love's Adventures1662for quiet sake , to be cleanly , witty and beautifullfor his pleasure sake , and
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A18589Davies, RichardChester's Triumph1610
most peculiar graces . Whose royall ,
clement , chast , and bounteousKing , ( King ; O too base
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A04632_05Jonson, BenSejanus His Fall 1614Besides , I know him subtle , close , wise , and wel-readIn man , and his large
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A15352Wilkins, GeorgeThe Miseries of Enforced Marriage 1607looke al your eies , Darke , Clowdy , thicke , and fulof heauines , Within my Country
79
A07065Marston, JohnThe Dutch Courtesan1605By my troath us a comely , fine , and handsomesight , for one of my
80
A46245Jordan, ThomasFancy's Festivals 1657unto your ear , Shall be compendious , pertinent and clear; So full of single innocence
81
A53060_10Cavendish, MargaretThe Unnatural Tragedy1662in publick and in private , confident , kind , and free, after an humble and insinuating
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A68468Middleton, ThomasYour Five Gallants1607thy selfe , Be thou but constant , firme and iustto mee , Rich heires shall
83
A47372_06Killigrew, Thomas1 Thomaso1654the Cup and Plate , still , constant , lean and loyal, that have the smoak of
84
A13393_01Tatham, John
The Fancies Theater (The Mirror of Fancies)
1640it , you shall finde Alwayes constant , true , and kinde; Wounds about it , it doth
85
A03223_02Heywood, Thomas2 The Iron Age1612thee Synon , Shee is both constant , wise , and beautifull. Syn. She's neither constant , wise
86
A77565_02Brome, RichardThe Novella1639that ( where now You have continuall new , and bounteoussuitors , That yeild me fees
87
A31023Baron, RobertMirza 1655after him ( he is so copious , authentique and transcendentin all he did ) I
88
A04874Kirke, JohnThe Seven Champions of Christendom 1638cause , The Knight was ever courteous , faire , and free, And ' gainst the Persian in
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A15814Yarington, RobertTwo Lamentable Tragedies 1594perswade himselfe , You will be courteous , kinde and affable, Ther's some rewarde for hoped
90
A18331Mabbe, JamesThe Spanish Bawd (Calisto and Meliboea) 1631shouldst call her faire and courteous , louely , and gentle. I pray thee how faire
91
A09224Peele, GeorgeEdward the First 1591men of warre , The women courteous , milde , and debonaire, Laying the● 〈◊〉 at princes
92
A05206anon.The True Chronicle of King Leir 1590and so demure ; So sober , courteous , modest , and precise, That all the Court hath
93
A53060_10Cavendish, MargaretThe Unnatural Tragedy1662
are naturally crafty , deceitful , false ,
covetous , luxurious , and amorous; they love their pleasures better
94
A53060_14Cavendish, Margaret1 Beauty, Love, and Wit1662
shamefastly ; she is proud , reserved ,
coy , disdainfull , and self-conceited. Tell-truth . Let me tell you
95
A53060_11Cavendish, MargaretThe Wooers1662not lame , crooked , and not crooked , ill-favour'd , and handsome. Trifle . 'Faith it is like
96
A53060_11Cavendish, MargaretThe Wooers1662And if she lov'd me crooked , lame , and blind, Now I am perfect , she'll
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A20081Dekker, ThomasSatiromastix1601Be skrwed a wry , made crooked , lame and vile, By racking coments , a●d calumnious
98
A01513_02Gascoigne, GeorgeJocasta1575Thou arte the cause , the crooked , olde and blynde, I am exilde farre from
99
A09232Peele, GeorgeThe Old Wives Tale1590behold , And yet is aged , crooked , weake and numbe. Thus by inchaunting spells I
100
A53060_03Cavendish, MargaretThe Several Wits1662is that which men calls cross , pievish , and froward
disposition , being most commonly , accompanied
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