SV Rear Shock Compatibility Chart
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Helpful Post
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http://www.svrider.com/forum/showpost.php?p=391852&postcount=2
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Last summer, after I did the shock swap in my bike, some one asked me "what's wrong with the stock shock, anyway?". In that spirit, I wrote this post as "questions and answers". Oh, by the way, I'm not an expert, and I am not pretending to have all the answers *:wink: .
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What?s wrong with the SV650 stock rear shock?
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The stock shock in the SV650 is very basic, it doesn?t offer a lot of dampening, and it is under-sprung for most riders. On top of that, it has a short lifespan. Depending on the weight of the rider, the shock may feel good /fine /OK when the bike it?s brand new, but it doesn?t last long. Typically, owners start complaining about not enough dampening when the bike is somewhere 3,000 ? 7,000 miles (various factors affect the life of the shock, like rider weight, road conditions, how the bike is ridden, and having a passenger often or not). I would say that the stock shock is practically dead at the 10,000 miles mark, but YMMV.
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What is so good about a replacement rear shock?
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More adjustment, for one: The stock shock can be adjusted for spring preload only. A replacement shock will at least offer spring preload, compression and rebound damping (damping is the key word here).
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The stock shock ?bottoms down? more or less easily, and rebounds too quickly, upsetting the chassis with a pogo-stick action. This excessive suspension movement means that the bike doesn?t inspire confidence to go faster, particularly in turns. On a bumpy road, instead of providing feedback about the road?s conditions, the rear wheel may keep going up and down in an exaggerated ?wave? motion, instead of following the road. Other symptoms include poor traction, diminished control, bike goes wide in turns because it?s difficult to aim / steer, etc. *But all these symptoms come gradually, and most riders gets used to them. That?s why when a replacement shock is installed, the difference is noticeable.
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In few words, a replacement shock is a better shock.
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But... Is upgrading the suspension mandatory?
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Well, read some opinions here: http://forum.svrider.com/index.php?topic=21126
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?You don?t have to race to need good shock.? TWF
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Which shock? Which spring rate? What model?
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Depends! Replacement shocks fall in two different categories:
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A) The more expensive, aftermarket offerings that are specifically designed to fit the bike (Ohlins, Penske, etc). This kind are straight bolt on?s that require no modification to fit.
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B) Rear shocks from another bike, like GSXR, Hayabusa, R1, 636, ZX9-R, ZX10-R, etc.etc. This kind is the cheap alternative to the above, and requires modifying or changing the bike a bit.
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I really don?t want to go into spring rates or models, the information is on the links below (keep reading), or do a search.
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How do I swap the shocks?
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It is a hassle to replace the first time (but it is recommended because you will enjoy this modification every single second that you ride the bike). Considering the price of the shock and the time to swap it, it is a lot of bang for the buck.
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The following instructions were prepared by TWF, I added some comments. These steps refer to the installation of a GSXR shock or similar.
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Remove seats. Take rear body work (tail) off.
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Take battery out.
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Unbolt tank hinge and cut off the part that pushes against the battery as seen here.
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Hang the bike from the ceiling using tie downs. This is necessary because the swingarm must not have any pressure on it. *Therefore, you must raise the rear end without using a swingarm stand.
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OK, here at step #4 I have to stop and mention this: if you have a garage with a strong ceiling, you can hang (suspend) the bike off as seen in this picture.
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If that is not possible, a ladder has been used with great success. See Avid?s photo:
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http://www.kuhnco.com/SV650/GSXRShoc...nded2Large.jpg
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If you cannot hang the bike, or don?t have a ladder strong enough, you can use jacks. Mstingray jack suspension method (jacks), photos in this thread:
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http://forum.svrider.com/index.php?topic=17385
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If you are anything like me, you may not have a garage, or a ladder, or jacks. To complete the shock swap, I only had a rear stand, so I got 6 empty milk crates (from the reciclyng) and a steel pipe. Only one person is required to lift the bike and then suspend it. *It looks 100% ghetto but it is the cheapest solution and it works. The picture below doesn't show it clearly, but the rear wheel is on the air and the bike is ready for the shock swap.
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Take out six bolts that hold fender to subframe (4 under and two next to tail light).
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Push fender back as much as the electrical wires /connectors will let you (or do as I did, remove it because I was installing a 2wheeljunkie undertray, see picture above, no fender).
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Unbolt shock and rear bolt of linkage bones, pull shock out.
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Install GSXR shock. Tighten top bolt. NOTE: before installing bottom bolt grind head of it for about 1/16-1/8" so bolt does not touch linkage bone when shock slides left and right (it is normal for shock to move left and right). Or replace with gsxr-1k lower shock bolt & nut): *bolt - 10x55 part # 09103-10143 * nut - part # 08319-31107. click here to see the grinding
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Tighten bottom bolt. blue loctite on the lower shock bolt
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Install and tighten linkage bolt.
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Push fender forward and you will see where it touches shock - cut it out around shock until it does not touch. Install and tighten the six bolts holding the fender.
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Installing the battery: it may or may not fit in, depedngin on the shock. You may have to remove the side foam out of battery box - battery will go in tight and touch shock. If you want more room for the battery take out the 4 bolts under the fender and put a washer between fender and sub-frame (no need to take out other 2 bolts by tail light).
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Install the rest of the parts and enjoy clicking your new shock.
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[size=14px]Common Problems[/size]
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Installing shock - Unable to loosen dog bones!
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?Here's a few things that I'd like to note, which might be a good idea to put on the install page to help morons like me... The bolt that goes through the forks at the bottom of the shock threads in the OPPOSITE side of which it threads in the factory shock. The install didin't state this, but a pictures shows that it in place with the 2 nuts of the dogbone on the same side. When i threaded in the same side as the factory bolt, it thread through one side of the fork and the middle of the bolt is actually thicker than the threaded part, so it go in a bind and I got it locked up in the sleeve. Also another thing to note, which would have made it easier to line everythign up is to not tighten the top bolt until all the other bolts are in place and started. This way, everything lines up nice and evenly? by InfiniteReality
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http://forum.svrider.com/index.php?topic=15531
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http://forum.svrider.com/index.php?topic==19181
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?But I want to see more pictures and need more info?
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vc
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AvidSV650Rider has a great site, TONS of PICS:
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Sorry, his site is down for now
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My 636 shock install by Punkjumper (nice pics)
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http://forum.svrider.com/index.php?topic=24059
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ZX9-R Shock Install by Gary in NJ (with pics)
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http://forum.svrider.com/index.php?topic=22996
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*PICS* Just got my new shock! By GaRn
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º
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BurnCycle posted this photos (more pics)
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http://forum.svrider.com/index.php?topic=76179
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ZX10R shock installed on first gen by Omaha 1 (pics)
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http://forum.svrider.com/index.php?topic=28496
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Typical FAQ
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http://forum.svrider.com/index.php?topic=6611
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