Proposed Sessions - Digital Pedagogies
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Delegate Name (Original/Main Proposer)AffiliationType of SessionName of SessionNumber of VotesDescriptionEmail
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Jenny BunnUCL Dept. for Information StudiesTalk/PlayCURATE gameThe idea would be that we would all play the CURATE game http://www.digcur-education.org/eng/Resources/CURATE-Game. I would bring the board/cards and then use this to lead into a discussion about the success of the resource as a teaching tool and then more broadly about how you can/should teach digital curation.j.bunn@ucl.ac.uk
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Rebecca RennellUniversity of the Highlands and IslandsTalk E-field tripsCreating fieldtrips in a virtual environment has been quite challenge, not only from a technical point of view but also in terms of pedagogy - why do we take archaeology students on field trips, what are the learning outcomes, how do we achieve these, etc. I think this kind of discussion would be of interest to any discipline where field trips traditionally form a core teaching component, for example geography, geology, ecology as well as a range of other environmental sciences. Let me know how you think we could contribute these ideas/themes to the un-conference. Rebecca.Rennell@uhi.ac.uk
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Domi SinclairUCL Information Services DivisionPlayA cold wind blows…This ‘Play’ session will be a way to generate ideas about and discuss the use of social media in education. The initial game of ‘A cold wind blows’ will be a way of generating ideas, this will then be followed by small group work to extend these ideas. Finally the session would be rounded off by a whole group discussion about the ideas produced by the small groups, including any points members of other groups would like to make.domi.sinclair@ucl.ac.uk
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James BakerThe British LibraryMakeMAKE: Teaching DH in two weeksWith Digital Humanities now officially a thing in the humanities, dedicated departments and centres have sprung up which support undergraduates and postgraduates in better understanding how and why to do digital research. And yet outside of these dedicated departments and centres there might be plenty of colleagues in HE want to teach something to their students about DH but are uncertain over what to teach or what can be achieved in a limited available time frame. Following on from a discussion at THATCamp London around teaching programming http://london2013.thatcamp.org/2013/04/15/a-community-for-mentoring-new-programmers/, I propose a session where attendees will create the framework for a two week programme (two lectures, two seminars, circa 4-6 hours) which colleagues in the sector can reuse, remix and insert into their introductory undergraduate humanities modules (the generic ‘Making History’ or ‘Being an Art Historian’ modules which are common in many departments).james.baker@bl.uk
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Gauti SigthorssonUniversity of GreenwichTeachCollaborative writing with ZoteroA practical lesson on how to use Zotero in writing longer research papers and books, for academics and researchers. I've recently published a co-authored book that was written using Zotero, so I'll focus on the process of collaboration (and the pitfalls).gauti.work@gmail.com
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Simon MahonyUCL Dept. for Information StudiesTalkOpen Educational Resources: using, re-using, re-mixing and re-purposing contentEducation for all has taken on a new meaning in the digital age and the true rationale of Openness is one of reclaiming original academic practice and collaboration; consequently the move towards openness extends beyond resources and also increasingly includes Open Educational Practices, or just Open Education. Simply creating resources is not enough but what is needed is to encourage and indeed develop a culture of using, re-using, re-mixing, and re-purposing the content of these resources.s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk
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Allan JohnsonCity University of Hong KongBlackboard and Moodle have proven to be valuable tools for enhancing student learning, but students ultimately leave these platforms behind following graduation. Instead of learning to use the technology that will remain with them throughout their careers, they learn to use technology that is specific only to the educational context. Is there, I wonder, a way to get the power of LMS tools (collaboration, portfolios, grading, etc.) from a combination of consumer-facing platforms such as Twitter, WordPress, Evernote, and Dropbox. How can educators leave the world of Blackboard without losing all of the power that it holds?allan_johnson@mac.com
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Peter BryantUniversity of GreenwichI want to debate and engage with others around some of the critical issues for e-learning in HE. I want to know why after decades of technological change in society, after changes in the way people live their lives with technology, we are still talking about e-learning in terms of possibilities and potentials. How do we move our practices forward in the same way most other sectors have in embracing and inetrgrating technology? I am specifically interested in the debate around the need and development of new pedagogies for HE, as the majority of our practice is still utilising approaches from the previous (and even more previous) century.p.j.bryant@gre.ac.uk
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Dr. Andreas KonstantinidisCentre for Technology Enhanced LearningTalk/MakeLearning Analytics: Moneyball for education?The session would explore the concept of Learning Analytics and examine how recorded data on student interactions can be used to customize, personalize and optimize the student experience online. The discussion can spring from a presentation of an offline Moodle Learning Analytics dashboard developed at King’s College using macros in Excel. Questions to ponder revolve around ethics, privacy, applicability, potential, assessment, and feedback. What can/should we measure? How can data from measurements be converted into practical information and advice for the teaching staff?andreas.konstantinidis@kcl.ac.uk
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Matteo Fumagalli, Rocío Diaz-BravoLSE Language CentreTalk The potential of Second Life for language learningThe use of Second Life as an educational tool still generates a great debate in secondary and higher education, as well as in informal educational contexts; many experiences of using this virtual world discovered strengths and obstacles but yet no single recipe of making it effective has been found.m.fumagalli@lse.ac.uk
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Rod DiggesUCLThe session will use a number of prompt cubes - these are paper cubes with statements printed onto each of their 6 faces. The statements are designed to provoke dialogue and debate around current issues in HE and FE. At the end of each statement is a URL that will take users to recently published materials on the internet that support the often contentious cube prompts. Workshop participants will be encouraged to form small groups. Each group will throw a prompt cube, investigate and discuss the ideas or issues suggested and, towards the end of the session, feed back their thoughts to other workshop participants. The cubes have been designed by Rod Digges of the UCL E-Learning Environments team using the facilities at www.bookleteer.com Participants are encouraged to bring a laptop, or other mobile device to help them with the research component of the workshop. An example prompt statement: "One of the primary function of an Educational Institution is to give a 'badge' of standing to those who pass through it, but are employers and others finding more reliable methods of gauging an individuals potential?"r.digges@ucl.ac.uk
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Roy WilliamsMOOCsTeach/PlayDescribing what happens in open learning, such as MOOCsThe session will explore ways to visualise what happens in MOOCs, or related open learning event, courses, installations, etc, using the Footprints of Emergence template, based on a work captured in the open wiki which shows how 3D ‘footprints’ are used to map out the dynamics of learning, in examples such as MOOCs, on-campus university courses, interactive installations for Autistic Children, and Montessori preschools. Participants will not be required to have any prior knowledge of the footprints. The footprints will be briefly explained, using one of the earliest MOOCs as an example, with reference to the online footprints resources in the wiki for further detail. Participants will be invited to work alone or in small groups, to draw footprints of courses, events or installations of their choice, and to reflect on the key issue, which is whether the particular mix of factors in the learning event they are describing is appropriate and fit for purpose, for the context in which it is used. Participants will be invited to join the wiki at any time, and to continue to contribute to the wiki and to further discussions and developments. roytwilliams@googlemail.com
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Rebecca BullardUniversity of ReadingFlipping the Humanities ClassroomThe concept of the flipped classroom has taken hold in many 'information based' disciplines in recent years. The basic idea is that digital media provide a means of giving students the kind of information that has, traditionally, been imparted in lecture form. Students watch a video that substitutes for the traditional lecture before they have a face-to-face session with a member of academic staff. The face-to-face session is then student-led, based on students' engagement with their previous, digital learning. Some describe the model as 'teaching at home; homework in class'. In many humanities subjects (including my own — English literature) this information-based model doesn't quite pertain. English is a highly discursive discipline; students learn through the practice of reading more than by digesting information. Still, the 'flipped classroom' model has proved so successful as a pedagogic tool in other subject areas that it would, I think, be worth considering how we might adapt it for more discursive, humanities disciplines.r.bullard@reading.ac.uk
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Julie WatsonUniversity of SouthamptonDigital literacies toolkitI am developing a digital literacies toolkit of interactive resources aimed at helping first year students (and possibly staff) … -think about to the educational affordances of Web 2.0 tools and services; -familiarising them with a range of useful applications for study-related purposes; -highlighting good practice in the use of social software and the internet in general. It’s work in progress and will eventually be open for anyone to use. A show and tell session to discuss approaches to content and ways of using this might be of interest.J.Watson@soton.ac.uk
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Claire RaistrickUniversity of WarwickMakeSEPT4TEL: Self-evaluative practices for technology enhanced learningI guess we are all interested in making Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) innovations (and improving them again and again and again). This is my idea for a session that focuses on using self-evaluative practices to improve TEL innovations. Ideally the time spent will have personal meaning for each of us and ultimately reach out to other educators too to help them develop digital pedagogies. An output of my recent research is guidance or considerations for educators who are making and evaluating their own TEL innovations. The seven typologies created from this research are based on what other educators actually did – what I call the SEPT4TEL framework. I’d like to share the SEPT4TEL framework so you can play around to see how meaningful it is for you. Then, having spent a while exploring use of the framework, I’d like us to pool our ideas to create sustainable ways for others to use the framework. c.g.raistrick@warwick.ac.uk
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Gloria EsegbonaKing's College LondonMakeHow to make a piece of software that enables/ triggers students to learn from their experience in the workplace, institution - and to capture all this learning and experience of it real time in a way that highlights poor teaching and poor teachers and allows students to drive their own teaching, ways of working.gesegbona@aol.com
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Gloria EsegbonaKing's College LondonMakeHow to make a collaboration website on e-educational theory that guides users to collaborate to develop their own quality content based on best practice .gesegbona@aol.com
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Pat LockleyAs a sort of technical person, I thought I might run a Make, Play and Teach session on how to make visualisations which have a greater pedagogical use and benefit that a pie chart that wobbles a little and is no better than what excel could give you.
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Some examples I’ve made in past that I’d be happy to share development methods and approaches for
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1) ww1centenary.oucs.ox.ac.uk/tag/interactive-maps/ - A variety of wikipedia and crowdsourced maps made using Google Earth
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2) www.flickr.com/photos/76886454@N02/sets/ - Variety of visualisations made from Plays / Books
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3) www.openjoyce.com/visualisations/ - Some visualisation tools, that take user input
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