Improved AP World History Planning Worksheet for links
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AP World History Planning Worksheet
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Total Instructional Days Available:175
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Allocation of Instructional DaysUnit Goals
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Period 1 to 600 BCE
4+2 (Syllabus/Summer Reading)Reading Comprehension, How to analyze documents (DECONSTRUCTION GUIDE), reading/writing strategies
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Period 2 600 BCE to 600 CE
12Reading Comprehension, How to analyze documents (DECONSTRUCTION GUIDE), reading/writing strategies
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Period 3 600 CE to 1450
35By this point, we have the Comparison/Argument Development skills and undestands basic of essays (thesis, evidence, warrant)
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Period 4 1450 to 1750
33+3( 1 day of Finals and 2 days open)By this point, we have the Causation skill and understand basics of essays
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Period 5 1750 to 1900
35By this point we will have Contextualization and Primary Source/HIPP analysis mastered
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Period 6 1900 to present
35By this point, we will have the DBQ, Secondary Sources, and Change/Continuity mastered Resources: Khan Academy, World History for US All, Freemanpedia, APWorldipedia
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Review14
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Day1Topic:SyllabusPeriod:Period 1 to 600 BCE
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Key Concepts:How to be successful in AP World
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Thematic Learning Objectives:What are they?
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Historical Thinking Skills:What are they?
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Resources for Independent Study:N/AHomework:Study for summer reading test
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- Read the Worst Mistake in Human History
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Lesson PlanTour of website, grading policies, homework, suggestions for organization, the exam...
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Materials:
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Syllabus
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How to complete homework terms
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Day2Topic:The Emergence of Civilizations (Period 1 and 2 Overview)Period:Period 1 to 600 CE
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Key Concepts:Key Concept 1.1 — Throughout the Paleolithic era, humans developed sophisticated technologies and adapted to different geographical environments as they migrated from Africa to Eurasia, Australasia, and the Americas.
I. Archeological evidence indicates that during the Paleolithic era, hunter/forager bands of humans gradually migrated from their origin in East Africa to Eurasia, Australia, and the Americas, adapting their technology and cultures to new climate regions.
A. Humans developed increasingly diverse and sophisticated tools—including multiple uses of fire—as they adapted to new environments.
B. People lived in small groups that structured social, economic, and political activity. These bands exchanged people, ideas, and goods.
Key Concept 1.2 Beginning about 10,000 years ago, some human communities adopted sedentism and agriculture, while others pursued hunter-forager or pastoralist lifestyles-- different pathways that had significant social and demographic ramifications
I. The Neolithic Revolution led to the development of more complex economic and social systems.
A. Possibly as a response to climatic change, permanent agricultural villages emerged first in the lands of the eastern Mediterranean. Agriculture emerged independently in Mesopotamia, the Nile River Valley, Sub-Saharan Africa, the Indus River Valley, the Yellow River (or Huang He) Valley, Papua New Guinea, Mesoamerica, and the Andes.
B. People in each region domesticated locally available plants and animals.
C. Pastoralism developed in Afro–Eurasian grasslands, affecting the environment in a variety of ways.
D. Agricultural communities had to work cooperatively to clear land and create the water control systems needed for crop production, drastically affecting environmental diversity.
II. Agriculture and pastoralism began to transform human societies.
A. Pastoralism and agriculture led to more reliable and abundant food supplies, which increased the population and led to specialization of labor, including new classes of artisans and warriors and the development of elites.
B. Technological innovations led to improvements in agricultural production, trade, and transportation.
C. Patriarchal forms of social organization developed in both pastoralist and agrarian societies.
Key Concept 1.3--The appearance of the first urban societies 5,000 years ago laid the foundations for the development of complex civilizations; these civilizations shared several significant social, political, and economic characteristics.
I. Core and foundational civilizations developed in a variety of geographical and environmental settings where agriculture flourished.
• Mesopotamia in the Tigris and Euphrates River Valleys
• Egypt in the Nile River Valley
• Mohenjo-daro and Harappa in the Indus River Valley
• Shang in the Yellow River (Huange He) Valley
• Olmec in Mesoamerica
• Chavin in Andean South America
II. The first states emerged within core civilizations in Mesopotamia and the Nile River Valley.
A. States were powerful new systems of rule that mobilized surplus labor and resources over large areas. Rulers of early states often claimed divine connections to power. Rulers also relied on the support of the military, religious, or aristocratic elites.
B. As states grew and competed for land and resources, the more favorably situated had greater access to resources, produced more surplus food, and experienced growing populations, enabling them to undertake territorial expansion and conquer surrounding states.
C. Pastoralists were often the developers and disseminators of new weapons and modes of transportation that transformed warfare in agrarian civilizations.
• Composite bows
• Iron weapons
III. Culture played a significant role in unifying states through laws, language, literature, religion, myths, and monumental art.
A. Early civilizations developed monumental architecture and urban planning.
• Pyramids
• Defensive walls
B. Systems of record keeping arose independently in all early civilizations and writing and record keeping subsequently spread.
• Cuneiform
• Hieroglyphs
C. States developed legal codes that reflected existing hierarchies and facilitated the rule of governments over people.
• Code of Hammurabi (Babylonia)
D. New religious beliefs that developed in this period—including the Vedic religion, Hebrew monotheism, and Zoroastrianism—continued to have strong influences in later periods.
E. Interregional cultural and technological exchanges grew as a result of expanding trade networks and large-scale population movements, such as the Indo–European and Bantu migrations.
F. Social hierarchies, including patriarchy, intensified as states expanded and cities multiplied.
Key Concept 2.1 As states and empires increased in size and contacts between regions intensified, human communities transformed their religious and ideological beliefs and practices.
I. Codifications and further developments of existing religious traditions provided a bond among people and an ethical code to live by.
A. The association of monotheism with Judaism further developed with the codification of the Hebrew Scriptures, which also reflected the influence of Mesopotamian cultural and legal traditions. The Assyrian, Babylonian, and Roman empires conquered various Jewish states at different points in time. These conquests contributed to the growth of Jewish diasporic communities around the Mediterranean and Middle East.
B. The core beliefs outlined in the Sanskrit scriptures formed the basis of the Vedic religions—developing later into what was known as Hinduism, a monistic belief system. These beliefs included the importance of multiple manifestations of brahman and teachings about dharma and reincarnation, and they contributed to the development of the social and political roles of a caste system.
II. New belief systems and cultural traditions emerged and spread, often asserting universal truths.
A. The core beliefs preached by the historic Buddha and collected by his followers in sutras and other scriptures were, in part, a reaction to the Vedic beliefs and rituals dominant in South Asia. Buddhism branched into many schools and changed over time as it spread throughout Asia— first through the support of the Mauryan emperor Ashoka, and then through the efforts of missionaries and merchants and the establishment of educational institutions to promote Buddhism’s core teachings.
B. Confucianism’s core beliefs and writings originated in the writings and lessons of Confucius. They were elaborated by key disciples, including rulers such as Wudi, who sought to promote social harmony by outlining proper rituals and social relationships for all people in China.
C. In major Daoist writings, the core belief of balance between humans and nature assumed that the Chinese political system would be altered indirectly. Daoism also influenced the development of Chinese culture.
D. Core beliefs of Christianity were based on the teachings, divinity, and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth as recorded by his disciples and drew on Judaism as well as Roman and Hellenistic influences. Despite initial Roman imperial hostility, Christianity spread through the efforts of missionaries, merchants, and early saints through many parts of Afro–Eurasia and eventually gained Roman imperial support by the time of Emperor Constantine.
E. Greco–Roman religious and philosophical traditions offered diverse perspectives on the study of the natural world, the connection to the divine, and the nature of political power and hierarchy. Some of these perspectives emphasized logic, empirical observation, and scientific investigation.
F. Art and architecture reflected the values of religions and belief systems.
III. Belief systems generally reinforced existing social structures while also offering new roles and status to some men and women.
A. Confucianism emphasized filial piety.
B. Some Buddhists and Christians practiced a monastic life.
IV. Other religious and cultural traditions continued and in some places were incorporated into major religious traditions.
A. Shamanism, animism, and ancestor veneration continued in their traditional forms in some instances, and in others were incorporated into other religious traditions.
Key Concept 2.2 - As the early states and empires grew in number, size, and population, they frequently competed for resources and came into conflict with one another.
I. The number and size of key states and empires grew dramatically as rulers imposed political unity on areas where previously there had been competing states.
A. Key states and empires that grew included:
• Southwest Asia: Persian empires
• East Asia: Qin and Han empires
• South Asia: Mauryan and Gupta empires
• Mediterranean region: Phoenicia and its colonies, Greek city-states and colonies, and Hellenistic and Roman empires
• Mesoamerica: Teotihuacan, Maya city-states
• Andean South America: Moche
• North America: Chaco and Cahokia
II. Empires and states developed new techniques of imperial administration based, in part, on the success of earlier political forms.
A. In order to organize their subjects, in many regions imperial rulers created administrative institutions, including centralized governments, as well as elaborate legal systems and bureaucracies.
B. Imperial governments promoted trade and projected military power over larger areas using a variety of techniques, including issuing currencies; diplomacy; developing supply lines; building fortifications, defensive walls, and roads; and drawing new groups of military officers and soldiers from the location populations or conquered populations.
III. Unique social and economic dimensions developed in imperial societies in Afro–Eurasia and the Americas.
A. Imperial cities served as centers of trade, public performance of religious rituals, and political administration for states and empires.
• Chang’an
• Rome
• Constantinople
B. The social structures of empires displayed hierarchies that included cultivators, laborers, slaves, artisans, merchants, elites, or caste groups.
C. Imperial societies relied on a range of methods to maintain the production of food and provide rewards for the loyalty of the elites.
D. Patriarchy continued to shape gender and family relations in imperial societies of this period.
IV. The Roman, Han, Persian, Mauryan, and Gupta empires encountered political, cultural, and administrative difficulties that they could not manage, which eventually led to their decline, collapse, and transformation into successor empires or states.
A. Through excessive mobilization of resources, erosion of established political institutions, and economic changes, imperial governments generated social tensions and created economic difficulties by concentrating too much wealth in the hands of elites.
B. Security issues along their frontiers, including the threat of invasions, challenged imperial authority.
Key Concept 2.3 — With the organization of large-scale empires, transregional trade intensified, leading to the creation of extensive networks of commercial and cultural exchange.
I. Land and water routes became the basis for interregional trade, communication, and exchange networks in the Eastern Hemisphere.
A. Many factors, including the climate and location of the routes, the typical trade goods, and the ethnicity of people involved, shaped the distinctive features of a variety of trade routes, including Eurasian Silk Roads, Trans-Saharan caravan routes, Indian Ocean sea lanes, and Mediterranean sea lanes.
II. New technologies facilitated long-distance communication and exchange.
A. New technologies permitted the use of domesticated pack animals to transport goods across longer routes.
B. Innovations in maritime technologies, as well as advanced knowledge of the monsoon winds, stimulated exchanges along maritime routes from East Africa to East Asia.
III. Alongside the trade in goods, the exchange of people, technology, religious and cultural beliefs, food crops, domesticated animals, and disease pathogens developed across extensive networks of communication and exchange.
A. The spread of crops, including rice and cotton from South Asia to the Middle East, encouraged changes in farming and irrigation techniques.
• The qanāt system
B. The spread of disease pathogens diminished urban populations and contributed to the decline of some empires, including the Roman and Han.
C. Religious and cultural traditions—including Christianity, Hinduism, and Buddhism—were transformed as they spread partly as a result of syncretism.
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Thematic Learning Objectives:SB-1 Explain how different forms of governance have been constructed and maintained over time
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Historical Thinking Skills:Continuity and Change Over Time
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Causation
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Resources for Independent Study:Pages 35-36, 68-69, 95-97, 132-133, 136-161Homework:Read Abstract & The Role of the Shaman including Traditional World View, The Initiation, The Professional Practice. NOTE if you have seen the movie Gran Torino, then you have seen what the article is talking about. Complete Cornell Notes with this reading.
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Crash Course World History #1 to #12Click here for the direction for Cornell Notes, please complete exactly as directed.
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Study for summer reading test
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Lesson Plan
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Materials:
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Cornell Notes
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Directions for taking and using Cornell Notes
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Day3Topic:Continuity Over Time: Shaminism and Animism Period:Period 2 600 to 600
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Key Concepts:2.1 As states and empires increased in size and contacts between regions intensified, human communities transformed their religious and ideological beliefs and practices.
II. New belief systems and cultural traditions emerged and spread, often asserting universal truths.
E. Greco–Roman religious and philosophical traditions offered diverse perspectives on the study of the natural world, the connection to the divine, and the nature of political power and hierarchy. Some of these perspectives emphasized logic, empirical observation, and scientific investigation.
IV. Other religious and cultural traditions continued and in some places were incorporated into major religious traditions. A. Shamanism, animism, and ancestor veneration continued in their traditional forms in some instances, and in others were incorporated into other religious traditions.
A. Shamanism, animism, and ancestor veneration continued in their traditional forms in some instances, and in others were incorporated into other religious traditions.
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Thematic Learning Objectives:ENV-1 Explain how different types of societies have adapted to and affected their environments
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SOC-5 Explain how social categories roles and practices have been maintained or challenged over time
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Historical Thinking Skills:Continuity and Change Over Time
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Analyzing Historical Evidence: Secondary & Primary Sources
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Resources for Independent Study:Textbook: 123-124 (5th: 125-126)Homework:Read Textbook: 55-59, 110-111 (5th:84-90, 112-116)
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Terms:
-Shamanism/Animism
-Greek Philosophy
-Israel
-Judaism (include a summary of beliefs)
-Monotheism
-Jewish Diaspora (what, who caused it (3 groups), & so what
-Zoroastrianism
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Read Excerpt from Hebrew Bible & answer questions for analysis on pages 60-61 (5th: 88-89). Provide thorough answers that specifically cite information in the document to support your conclusions
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Lesson PlanThe Ancient and Classical periods witnessed major CHANGES and CONTINUITIES in the religions and philosophies that govern how people lived their lives, including the rise of six of the world's great faiths. We will discuss each of these faiths later this week and explore how they became CONTINUITIES in our culture. Today we will focus on the idea of CHANGE and CONTINUITY in World History by looking at an example of each related to religion and philosophy: the rise of a philosophy that questioned the very idea of faith and a faith that remains largely unchanged since the Paleolithic period.

CONTINUITY: Christian perceptions of Shamanism and animism
- Hmong article: Students discuss 3 things they learned, 2 things that suprised them, and 1 example of continuity over time.
- Adam of Bremen's perception of the Scandinavians: Practice Deconstruction Guide

CHANGE: Greek Philosophy
- Plato's Cave Allegory: Students draw image as teacher reads allegory then discuss meaning
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Materials:
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Hmong ArticleDeconstruction Guide
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Adam of Bremen preceptions of Scandinavians
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Plato's Cave Allegory
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Day4Topic:JudaismPeriod:Period 1 to 600 BCE
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Key Concepts:III. Culture played a significant role in unifying states through laws, language, literature, religion, myths, and monumental art.
D. New religious beliefs that developed in this period—including the Vedic religion, Hebrew monotheism, and Zoroastrianism—continued to have strong influences in later periods.
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Thematic Learning Objectives:CUL-1 Explain how religions belief systems philosophies and ideologies originated developed and spread as a result of expanding communication and exchange networks
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CUL-2 Explain how religions belief systems philosophies and ideologies affected political economic and social developments over time
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Historical Thinking Skills:Analyzing Historical Evidence: Primary Sources
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Continuity and Change Over Time
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Resources for Independent Study:Textbook: 55-59, 110-111 (5th:84-90, 112-116)Homework:Study for Summer Reading Test
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Khan Academy VideoStudy for map quiz - see page 33 in this link
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Lesson PlanQuestions for analysis due
Students examine a selection of Deuteronomic Codes and Hammurabi's Code. In groups they will sort them into two categories: "unique to the Hebrews" & "reflects Mesopotamian influence" (i.e. like Hammurabi's Codes)

Students use data from documents to address each of today's Thematic Learning Objectives.
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Materials:
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Selections from Deuteronomic Codes and Hammurabi's Code
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Deconstruction Guide
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Day5Topic:Summer Reading TestPeriod:All
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Key Concepts:Various
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Thematic Learning Objectives:ECON-3 Explain how different modes and locations of production and commerce have developed and changed over time
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Historical Thinking Skills:Analyzing Historical Evidence: Secondary Sources
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Resources for Independent Study:A History of the World in Six Glasses by Tom StandageHomework:Read Textbook: 165-169, 171-174 (5th: 173-178, 180-190)
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Terms
-Vedic Age India
-Caste System (also known as "varna")
-Rig Veda
-Hinduism (include Dharma, Reincarnation, & Brahma)
-Indian Epics
-Hindu Temples
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Lesson PlanSummer Reading Test and Geography Quiz
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Materials:
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Day6Topic:HinduismPeriod:Period 1 to 600 BCE
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Key Concepts:Key Concept 1.3--The appearance of the first urban societies 5,000 years ago laid the foundations for the development of complex civilizations; these civilizations shared several significant social, political, and economic characteristics.
III. Culture played a significant role in unifying states through laws, language, literature, religion, myths, and monumental art.
D. New religious beliefs that developed in this period—including the Vedic religion, Hebrew monotheism, and Zoroastrianism—continued to have strong influences in later periods.
Key Concept 2.1 As states and empires increased in size and contacts between regions intensified, human communities transformed their religious and ideological beliefs and practices.
I. Codifications and further developments of existing religious traditions provided a bond among people and an ethical code to live by.
B. The core beliefs outlined in the Sanskrit scriptures formed the basis of the Vedic religions—developing later into what was known as Hinduism, a monistic belief system. These beliefs included the importance of multiple manifestations of brahman and teachings about dharma and reincarnation, and they contributed to the development of the social and political roles of a caste system.
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Thematic Learning Objectives:CUL-1 Explain how religions belief systems philosophies and ideologies originated developed and spread as a result of expanding communication and exchange networks
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CUL-2 Explain how religions belief systems philosophies and ideologies affected political economic and social developments over time
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Historical Thinking Skills:Causation
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Resources for Independent Study:Textbook: 165-169, 171-174 (5th: 173-178, 180-190)Homework:Read Textbook: 169-171, 238 (5th: 178-180, 218)
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Crash Course VideoTerms
-Buddhism (including: Enlightenment, Bodhisattvas, Four Noble Truths)
-Sutras
-Mahayana Buddhism
-Ashoka
-Monasticism
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Optional:
http://whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondaythirtytwo_files/frame.htm
http://whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondaytwentyfive_files/frame.htm
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Lesson PlanLecture with graphic organizer on the basic beliefs of Hinduism and the effects of these beliefs on culture.
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Materials:
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Modern image of the incarnations of Vishnu
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Graphic Organizer
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Day7Topic:BuddismPeriod:Period 2 600 to 600
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Key Concepts:Key Concept 2.1 As states and empires increased in size and contacts between regions intensified, human communities transformed their religious and ideological beliefs and practices.
II. New belief systems and cultural traditions emerged and spread, often asserting universal truths.
A. The core beliefs preached by the historic Buddha and collected by his followers in sutras and other scriptures were, in part, a reaction to the Vedic beliefs and rituals dominant in South Asia. Buddhism branched into many schools and changed over time as it spread throughout Asia— first through the support of the Mauryan emperor Ashoka, and then through the efforts of missionaries and merchants and the establishment of educational institutions to promote Buddhism’s core teachings.
III. Belief systems generally reinforced existing social structures while also offering new roles and status to some men and women.
B. Some Buddhists and Christians practiced a monastic life.
Key Concept 2.3 — With the organization of large-scale empires, transregional trade intensified, leading to the creation of extensive networks of commercial and cultural exchange.
C. Religious and cultural traditions—including Christianity, Hinduism, and Buddhism—were transformed as they spread partly as a result of syncretism.
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Thematic Learning Objectives:CUL-1 Explain how religions belief systems philosophies and ideologies originated developed and spread as a result of expanding communication and exchange networks
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CUL-2 Explain how religions belief systems philosophies and ideologies affected political economic and social developments over time
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Historical Thinking Skills:Continuity and Change Over Time
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