Fall 2014 Undergraduate English and Film Courses (ALWAYS CHECK BANNER FOR UP-TO-DATE SCHEDULE)
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CRNSubjCourseSecInstructorTitleDaysTimeDescriptionSelected Texts
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80794ENGL10001Jennifer Lynn Sisk (P)Appreciating Literature - GUMWF08:00 am-08:50 am
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80797ENGL10002Su-Ching Huang (P)Appreciating Literature - GUTR08:00 am-09:15 amIn this course we'll read literature by US writers and writers from the countries of our linking universities. The global understanding component, which provides our students with the unique opportunity of tele-conferencing with partner classes from three universities in three different countries, offers students the opportunity to understand, explore and appreciate the nature of human diversity and globalization by providing a direct international experience in a virtual collaborative learning environment.
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80800ENGL10003Corinee Wooten Guy (P)Appreciating LiteratureMWF10:00 am-10:50 am
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80803ENGL10004Kristy Lynn Ulibarri (P)Appreciating Literature: Novels into FilmMW02:00 pm-03:15 pmThis course will consider the relationship between novels and their film adaptations. We will consider how books translate into the visual medium and what themes, concepts, and contexts transfer between the two textual mediums. Students will be expected to write short responses on the books and take exams that showcase what they’ve learned in the course.Cloud Atlas
Children of Men
One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest
The Hunger Games
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80805ENGL10005Kristy Lynn Ulibarri (P)Appreciating Literature: Novels into FilmMW03:30 pm-04:45 pmThis course will consider the relationship between novels and their film adaptations. We will consider how books translate into the visual medium and what themes, concepts, and contexts transfer between the two textual mediums. Students will be expected to write short responses on the books and take exams that showcase what they’ve learned in the course.Cloud Atlas
Children of Men
One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest
The Hunger Games
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80807ENGL10006Ronald W Hoag (P)Appreciating LiteratureTR11:00 am-12:15 pmThe course takes a "close reading" approach to 10 short stories, 30 poems, 1 short play, and 1 movie--all of which are important, interesting, and entertaining. This course answers the question, "Why should made-up stories matter to me?" The skills developed in this course will enrich your personal life and help you in many other ECU courses. Manageable reading assignments, four tests including the final exam, one optional short paper for extra credit.Just one book, reasonably priced:

Literature: The Human Experience, Shorter 9th Edition, Abcarian & Klotz, (Bedford/St. Martin's)
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80809ENGL10007Jessica Dawn Bardill (P)Appreciating LiteratureTR12:30 pm-01:45 pmThis course introduces students to a wide range of literary texts and ways of reading to enhance their enjoyment and understanding of literature. These texts come from a variety of cultural backgrounds, as well as multiple genres. Students will learn multiple interpretive strategies to apply to their readings in and out of the classroom of literature and narrative film.Bloodchild and other Stories by Octavia Butler
Bedford Compact Guide to Literature
The Truth about Stories by Thomas King
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80811ENGL10008Michael Parker (P)Appreciating LiteratureR06:30 pm-09:30 pm
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83205ENGL10009Andrew Pendleton Bates (P)Appreciating LiteratureMWF09:00 am-09:50 amNon-Writing Intensive, provide exposure for students on a wide range of short fiction, poetry, and a brief novel. Explore, discuss, and analyze as a class.TBA
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80813ENGL1000601Helena M Feder (P)Appreciating Literature - DEOnline
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81443ENGL20001Thomas L Herron (P)Interpreting Literature - WIMW02:00 pm-03:15 pm
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81445ENGL20002Richard C Taylor (P)Interpreting Literature - WITR08:00 am-09:15 amApplication of basic principles of literary interpretation to texts in a variety of genres and from a variety of cultural perspectives. Offered in Distance Education format. This course is an excellent preparation for students considering the English major or for those interested in developing their reading and writing skills in the context of literary study.Roxana, Daniel Defoe
When We Were Orphans, Kazuo Ishiguro
The Holy Rosenbergs, Ryan Craig
Small Island, Andrea Levy
Selected Poems, Gwendolyn Brooks
The Book Thief, Markus Zusak
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81447ENGL20003Sean Michael Morris (P)Interpreting Literature - WITR02:00 pm-03:15 pm
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81449ENGL20004Marame Gueye (P)Interpreting Literature - WITR09:30 am-10:45 am
16
81450ENGL20005Sandra K Tawake (P)Interpreting Literature - WIMWF10:00 am-10:50 am
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81452ENGL20006Sandra K Tawake (P)Interpreting Literature - WIMWF11:00 am-11:50 am
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81454ENGL20007James W Kirkland (P)Interpreting Literature - WITR11:00 am-12:15 pm
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81456ENGL20008James W Kirkland (P)Interpreting Literature - WITR12:30 pm-01:45 pm
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81457ENGL20009Anne Mallory (P)Interpreting Literature - WIMWF02:00 pm-02:50 pm
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83206ENGL200010Sean Michael Morris (P)Interpreting Literature - WITR09:30 am-10:45 am
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81461ENGL2000601Julie Fay (P)Interpreting Literature -WI,DEOnline
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82696ENGL21001Elizabeth Massa Hoiem (P)Major British Writers - WIMWF08:00 am-08:50 am
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82697ENGL21002Elizabeth Massa Hoiem (P)Major British Writers - WIMWF09:00 am-09:50 am
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82698ENGL22001Peter J Franks (P)Major American Writers - WIMWF09:00 am-09:50 amThis WI course acquaints you with major American authors and texts, focusing on the 20th century’s modernist period and some of its precursors. We will practice writing, close reading, and historical awareness. Themes include identity, self-consciousness, the present, and senses of place. Highlights include poetry by Whitman, Dickinson, and Hughes; fiction by Cather, Faulkner, Hurston, and Pynchon; and a module on modernism in the South.Cather, The Professor's House
Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49
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82699ENGL22002Peter J Franks (P)Major American Writers: Modernism - WIMWF10:00 am-10:50 amThis WI course acquaints you with major American authors and texts, focusing on the 20th century’s modernist period and some of its precursors. We will practice writing, close reading, and historical awareness. Themes include identity, self-consciousness, the present, and senses of place. Highlights include poetry by Whitman, Dickinson, and Hughes; fiction by Cather, Faulkner, Hurston, and Pynchon; and a module on modernism in the South.Cather, The Professor's House
Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49
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82700ENGL22003Edgar Thomson Shields (P)Major American Writers - WITR02:00 pm-03:15 pmAn exploration of various American writers literature and their relationship to the history and cultures of the times, from the first European and Native American contacts to the present day. The emphasis will be on analysis of how works express both something about the period they were written as well as about universal human experiences. A writing intensive course, there will be three analysis papers along with regular reading responses and a final in-class essay.There will be no textbook for the course. Instead, all readings will be made available electronically, either through online databases or as files provided through the course Blackboard site.
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82701ENGL22004Thomas E Douglass (P)Major American Writers - WITR03:30 pm-04:45 pm
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82702ENGL22301Margaret D Bauer (P)Southern LiteratureTR12:30 pm-01:45 pmThis class surveys the literature of the American South from pre-Civil War plantation fiction through the contemporary South19th century writers like Charles Chesnutt and Kate Chopin (short stories on line); Southern Renascence writers like William Faulkner, Katherine Anne Porter, and North Carolina's own Paul Green; contemporary writers like Flannery O'Connor, Eudora Welty, and Ernest Gaines
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82703ENGL24001Marame Gueye (P)World Literature in English - WITR12:30 pm-01:45 pm
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82704ENGL24201Sandra K Tawake (P)The Short StoryMWF08:00 am-08:50 am
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82705ENGL24202Brian David Glover (P)The Short StoryMWF11:00 am-11:50 amIn this course, you will study some of the most famous and canonical short stories in English. You will also, as part of a group project, read and study many new stories currently being published in recent periodicals.Stories by Baldwin, Bambara, Cheever, Melville, O'Connor, Welty and many more. New stories may come from _The New Yorker_, _The Southern Review_, _African-American Review_, _AGNI_, _Granta_, and _The Oxford American_.
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83207ENGL24203Brian David Glover (P)The Short StoryMWF10:00 am-10:50 amIn this course, you will study some of the most famous and canonical short stories in English. You will also, as part of a group project, read and study many new stories currently being published in recent periodicals.Stories by Baldwin, Bambara, Cheever, Melville, O'Connor, Welty and many more. New stories may come from _The New Yorker_, _The Southern Review_, _African-American Review_, _AGNI_, _Granta_, and _The Oxford American_.
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82706ENGL25701Andrea Kitta (P)The SupernaturalMW02:00 pm-03:15 pmThis course will focus on the experience of supernatural traditions; how people explain these traditions and the logic they use to understand them; how belief in the supernatural changes over time; functions and structures of belief traditions; and relationships between types of belief. Goldstein, Diane; Sylvia Grider, and Jeanie Banks Thomas. 2007. Haunting Experiences: Ghosts in Contemporary Folklore. Utah State University Press: Logan, Utah. 0874216362 Required.

Hufford, David. 1982. The Terror that Comes in the Night: An Experience Centered Study of Supernatural Assault Traditions. University of Pennsylvania Press. 081221305X Required.

Primiano, Leonard. “I Wanna Do Bad Things With You: Fantasia on Themes of American Religion from the Title Sequence of HBO’s True Blood”

Dundes, Selected readings from Vampire: A Casebook.
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82707ENGL27001Solveig Jana Bosse (P)Introduction to Language StudiesTR03:30 pm-04:45 pmWe briefly investigate the building blocks of language (sounds, words, sentences, meaning) which we discuss with respect to language in society, language and culture, first language acquisition, language and the brain, language and psychology.
The course is aimed at students majoring in English, Education, Foreign Languages, Psychology, Anthropology, and similar areas of study. No prior knowledge of language studies/linguistics is expected.
Language Files (Ohio State University)
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82708ENGL27101Mark David Johnson (P)English GrammarTR09:30 am-10:45 amThis descriptive grammar course gives students an understanding of the underlying structure of the English language, providing them with the terminology needed to better explain “how English works.”Borjars, K., & Burridge, K. (2010). Introducing English Grammar. New York: Rutledge.
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82710ENGL27401Michael J Aceto (P)Language in the USATR12:30 pm-01:45 pm
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82711ENGL28151Donald Alexander Albright (P)Introduction to Creative WritingTR11:00 am-12:15 pmIntroduction to writing original fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and drama. Course is designed to help writers identify which genres of creative writing best suit their individual talents. Intro to workshop method of instruction. Writers should be willing participants in class discussion and writing workshops.Creative Writing: Four Genres in Brief
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82713ENGL28152Amber F Thomas (P)Introduction to Creative WritingMW02:00 pm-03:15 pm
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82715ENGL28153John Hoppenthaler (P)Introduction to Creative WritingTR03:30 pm-04:45 pmENGL 2815 provides an introduction to creative writing in four major genres—poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, and drama—and to practice in the basics of image, metaphor, line, form, sound, plot, characterization, and voice. It focuses specifically on literary genres as they appear on the page. Since this is a writing course and not a course in acting or performing, and although the performative aspects of literature are both important and compelling, the course will not entertain “spoken word” efforts. The course also acknowledges the important relationship between creative writing and the practice of literary critique and explication by requiring students to read, analyze, discuss, pass informed judgment upon, and write about contemporary literary genres. Furthermore, ENGL 2815 serves as a core course for the new English Minor in Creative Writing.The Portable MFA in Creative Writing
examples from each genre
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82716ENGL28154Amber F Thomas (P)Introduction to Creative WritingMW03:30 pm-04:45 pm
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82718ENGL28155Amber F Thomas (P)Introduction to Creative WritingR06:30 pm-09:30 pm
43
82722ENGL30001Nicole Nolan Sidhu (P)History of British Literature to 1700TR12:30 pm-01:45 pmTHE COURSE COVERS MAJOR WORKS OF ENGLISH LITERATURE FROM ITS BEGINNINGS UNTIL THE YEAR 1700. THESE INCLUDE WORKS BY CANONICAL AUTHORS LIKE CHAUCER, SPENSER, SHAKESPEARE AND MILTON BUT ALSO LESSER-KNOWN WORKS THAT REVEAL IMPORTANT ELEMENTS OF EARLY ENGLISH LANGUAGE LITERATURE. WHILE READING THIS LITERATURE WE WILL EXPLORE THE EVOLUTION OF IDEAS ABOUT: THE INDIVIDUAL, FREE WILL AND POLITICAL ENTITLEMENT, SOCIAL POWER RELATIONS, RELIGIOUS FAITH AND INSTITUTIONS, MARRIAGE, SEXUALITY, AND RACE.BEOWULF
CHAUCER'S CANTERBURY TALES
SPENSER'S FAERIE QUEENE
MILTON'S PARADISE LOST
SONNETS AND OTHER FORMS OF LYRIC POETRY
44
82725ENGL30101Laureen Tedesco (P)History of British Literature, 1700-1900MWF02:00 pm-02:50 pmIn this a survey of British literature from 1660 (the Restoration of the British Monarchy) to 1900, we will read eighteenth-century satirists (John Gay and Jonathan Swift), great English stylists (Addison and Steele, Samuel Johnson), early and late Romantic poets (Robert Burns, William Blake, Anna Barbauld, William Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, Byron), prose essayists on social questions, Victorian poets (Emily Bronte, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning, Alfred, Lord Tennyson), and two novelists (Austen and Dickens).Jane Austen's Persuasion
Charles Dickens's Hard Times
John Gay's Beggar's Opera
Selections from Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels
Arthur Conan Doyle's "The Speckled Band"
45
82727ENGL30201Edgar Thomson Shields (P)History of American Literature to 1900TR03:30 pm-04:45 pm“History of American Literature to 1900” provides background for English majors and minors by examining the various periods of American literature and their relationship to the history and cultures of the times, from the first European and Native American contacts to 1900. In addition, basic research skills for historically-based literary and cultural study will be taught. There will be no textbook for the course. Instead, all readings will be made available electronically, either through online databases or as files provided through the course Blackboard site.
46
82728ENGL30401Kirk St Amant (P)Introduction to Professional WritingTR02:00 pm-03:15 pm
47
82730ENGL32601Reginald Wade Watson (P)African American Literature - WITR11:00 am-12:15 pmThe Black American Literature tradition has, in the past, been largely overlooked on all levels of education. It has only been recently that efforts have been made to increase public and educational awareness of the African-American’s contributions to literature. This course is designed to present a few of the many black-authored works so that a thorough and critical analysis can be made. In this course you will learn how to read, write, and think critically so that you can respond competently through either written or verbal expression. The goal of this course is to help you gain a full appreciation and understanding of the African-American tradition.Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave Written by Himself
Frederick Douglass
Their Eyes Were Watching God Zora Neale Hurston
Native Son Richard Wright
Beloved Toni Morrison
Black Voices: An Anthology of Afro-American Literature Chapman (optional)
A Turbulent Voyage Floyd W. Hayes, III
48
82733ENGL32602Reginald Wade Watson (P)African American Literature - WITR03:30 pm-04:45 pmThe Black American Literature tradition has, in the past, been largely overlooked on all levels of education. It has only been recently that efforts have been made to increase public and educational awareness of the African-American’s contributions to literature. This course is designed to present a few of the many black-authored works so that a thorough and critical analysis can be made. In this course you will learn how to read, write, and think critically so that you can respond competently through either written or verbal expression. The goal of this course is to help you gain a full appreciation and understanding of the African-American tradition.Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave Written by Himself
Frederick Douglass
Their Eyes Were Watching God Zora Neale Hurston
Native Son Richard Wright
Beloved Toni Morrison
Black Voices: An Anthology of Afro-American Literature Chapman (optional)
A Turbulent Voyage Floyd W. Hayes, III
49
82738ENGL33001Nicole Nolan Sidhu (P)Women and Literature - WITR02:00 pm-03:15 pmDescription: The class aims to introduce you to some of the major issues and concerns of women’s writing in English through the study of selected works. Amongst the questions we will address are: How does literature by women speak to issues that affect women? How does it engage with the misogynist elements of Western culture? Is there a discernable tradition of women’s writing? What does it mean to write as a woman? How do other issues -- such as family, race, and class --intersect with women’s issues in the texts we study? Marie de France, Lais
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (Norton)
Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre (Norton)
Toni Morrison, Sula (Vintage)
Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale (Random House)
Eve Ensler, The Vagina Monologues (Villard)

50
82741ENGL33401Robert J Siegel (P)Contemporary DramaTR12:30 pm-01:45 pm
51
82743ENGL34801Donald E Palumbo (P)Science FictionMWF11:00 am-11:50 amThis course will cover four classic science fiction novels and four classic science fiction films. There will be an easy quiz on each of the four novels, just to give you credit for reading them, and there will be three in-class essay exams on the films and novels. The class will also divide into six small groups of about six students each to discuss select elements of the four novels.Films: Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, Back to the Future, The Terminator. Novels: Flowers for Algernon, The Stars My Destination, Dune.
52
82745ENGL35701James W Kirkland (P)American Folklore - WITR09:30 am-10:45 am
53
82746ENGL35702Andrea Kitta (P)American Folklore - WIMW03:30 pm-04:45 pm
54
82747ENGL36001David Wilson-Okamura (P)Classics from Homer to DanteMWF01:00 pm-01:50 pm
55
82752ENGL37001Michael J Aceto (P)History of the English Language - wENGL6505TR11:00 am-12:15 pm
56
82755ENGL37301Solveig Jana Bosse (P)Structure of the English Language: Phonetics & Morphology - wENGL6526TR02:00 pm-03:15 pmWe are looking at the structure of English words from two perspectives: sounds and word formation. We will discuss the sounds of English, how they are produced, how they are combined into syllables and words, and how the usage of a word can affect its pronunciation. Then we will look at the process how words of English are formed and why words mean what that mean. This also includes discussing how new words are added to the language.Beverley Collins and Inger Mees: Practical Phonetics and Phonology

Rochelle Lieber: Introducing Morphology
57
82756ENGL37601Solveig Jana Bosse (P)Linguistic Theory for Speech and Hearing CliniciansTR11:00 am-12:15 pm
58
82758ENGL38101Erika J Galluppi (P)Advanced Composition - WITR02:00 pm-03:15 pm
59
82760ENGL3810601Melissa Matyjasik Parsons (P)Advanced Composition - WI, DEOnline
60
82761ENGL38201Erin Anne Frost (P)Scientific Writing - WITR09:30 am-10:45 amThis course asks students to consider the situated nature of particular contexts of scientific writing and also to produce scientific writing for various purposes. We will examine theories, methodologies, and ideologies that undergird scientific writing with an eye to perfecting both critique and imitation of scientific styles.
61
82763ENGL38202Michelle F Eble (P)Scientific Writing - WITR11:00 am-12:15 pm
62
82764ENGL38301Robert J Siegel (P)Introduction to Play WritingTR03:30 pm-04:45 pmThe course will introduce students to the fundamentals of playwriting. We'll work on developing a voice for characters and focus on scene construction, plot and character development. We'll also look at dramatic irony and use of metaphor. In addition, we will read plays and excerpts from plays of different genres to better understand the craft of playwriting and to help solve problems we encounter in our own work. By the end of the semester, students will have developed an idea into a one-act play or at least 30 pages of a full length play (with revisions). There is an attendance requirementSight Unseen
Water By The Spoonful
Equus
Company
Excerpts posted by the instructor

63
82766ENGL3830601Robert J Siegel (P)Introduction to Play Writing - DEOnlineThe course will introduce students to the fundamentals of playwriting. We'll work on developing a voice for characters and focus on scene construction, plot and character development. We'll also look at dramatic irony and use of metaphor. In addition, we will read plays and excerpts from plays of different genres to better understand the craft of playwriting and to help solve problems we encounter in our own work. By the end of the semester, students will have developed an idea into a one-act play or at least 30 pages of a full length play (with revisions). There is an attendance requirementSight Unseen
Water By The Spoonful
Equus
Company
Excerpts posted by the instructor

64
82773ENGL38401John Hoppenthaler (P)Introduction to Poetry WritingTR02:00 pm-03:15 pmENGL 3840 provides an introduction to the writing of poetry and practice in the basics of poetic practice, focusing on content, image, metaphor, line, form, sound, and voice. It focuses specifically on literary poetry as it appears on the page. Since this is a writing course and not a course in acting or performing, and although the performative aspects of poetry are both important and compelling, the course will not entertain “spoken word” efforts. The course also acknowledges the important relationship between poetry writing and the practice of literary critique and explication by requiring students to read, analyze, discuss, pass informed judgment upon, and write about contemporary poetry.The Keys to the Jail by Keetje Kuipers
student poems are a primary text in this course
65
82774ENGL38501J Luke Whisnant (P)Intro to Fiction WritingW06:30 pm-09:30 pm
66
82778ENGL3850601Liza A Wieland (P)Intro to Fiction WritingOnlineThis course will introduce you to the basics of short story writing, with special attention to character, setting, plot and language. You will read and discuss stories from the text, test the waters with warm-up exercises, and produce two complete short stories. The class will critique these stories using the workshop method through Blackboard's Discussion Board. Grading is based on completing assignments and participating in discussion, rather than on that mysterious quality we call talent.Method and Madness, Alice LaPlante, editor
67
82786ENGL38611Donald Alexander Albright (P)Creative Nonfiction from the Writer's PerspectiveTR12:30 pm-01:45 pmThis course fulfills a cognate requirement for minoring in creative writing. It will provide undergraduate creative writers with both a practical and a theoretical understanding of several different nonfiction forms. No existing undergraduate English course examines nonfiction from the creative writer’s perspective, so this course is designed to fill that void. By focusing primarily on contemporary works, it will also supplement the department’s literature offerings, as there is no course specifically focused on readings of exceptional recent creative nonfiction.

The course also offers introductory instruction in writing creative nonfiction based on personal experience and observations
Janisse Ray, Ecology of a Cracker Childhood

Best American essays 2013

The Art of Truth, anthology edited by Bill Roorbach

Harry Crews, A Childhood: Biography of a Place

Marjorie Hudson: Searching for Virginia Dare

Anatomy of Baseball ed. by Lee Gutkind (only a penny at amazon)

plus selected online texts
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82788ENGL38701Donna Jean Kain (P)Introduction to Editing & Publishing -WIMW02:00 pm-03:15 pmInterested in an editing and publishing career after graduation? The class will develop these hands-on skills by editing and publishing the second issue of The Lookout, a journal of undergraduate research at ECU. You’ll improve your writing and editing too. You will learn to use several methods of marking documents including hard-copy and electronic editing; to distinguish between grammatical and stylistic choices; to apply principles of contextual editing; to analyze, critique, and revise manuscripts for different audiences; and to create successful writer/editor dialogues. Amy Einsohn, The Copyeditor's Handbook, 3rd Edition. ISBN-13: 978-0520271562

The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th Edition ISBN-13: 978-0226104201 (purchase is optional)
69
82822ENGL40701David Wilson-Okamura (P)Shakespeare: The HistoriesMWF10:00 am-10:50 am
70
82823ENGL40801Marianne Montgomery (P)Shakespeare: The ComediesTR09:30am-10:45amIn this course, we’ll read a representative sample of Shakespeare’s comedies. This is primarily a course in learning to read Shakespeare with close attention to both dramatic form and thematic content. We’ll consider the plays as historical documents of early modern England and as dramatic fictions whose concerns—from marriage to social expectations to racial and religious identity—still speak to us today. The Taming of the Shrew, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure
71
82824ENGL40901David Wilson-Okamura (P)Shakespeare: The TragediesMWF09:00 am-09:50 am
72
82826ENGL41001Jeffrey Stephens Johnson (P)17th-Century Literature - wENGL6131MW02:00 pm-03:15 pmThis course will focus on the wide variety of occasional poetry and prose written in the 17th century, and written by and about a wide range of authors from the period. Poetry of this type commemorates such events as births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, and religious holidays/festivals. It often is addressed to patrons, at times as verse letters, or to loved ones, in some cases as valedictions (moments of parting). Occasional prose can take the form of sermons, essays, meditations, polemic pamphlets, letters, speeches, and diaries. The writing assignments for the course will provide opportunities to explore and work with digital sites related to the course subject matter.
73
82828ENGL41501Anne Mallory (P)The Romantic Period -wENGL6155MWF01:00 pm-01:50 pmWe’ll study literature produced in Britain between 1780-1830, an era marked by political revolution and radical literary experiment. Topics will range from public debates—the movement to end Britain’s participation in the international slave trade, arguments for the rights of women—to intimate, philosophical reflections concerning childhood, creativity, and dreams. Readings will likely include works by Blake, Wordsworth, Wollstonecraft, Coleridge, Percy and Mary Shelley, Byron, and Keats, along with those by less familiar writers, especially women.
74
82830ENGL42501Ronald W Hoag (P)American Literature, 1865-1920TR09:30 am-10:45 amThe course surveys American literature of the realistic and naturalistic periods with historical/cultural background and “close reading” of works by Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Rebecca Harding Davis, William Dean Howells, Mark Twain, Harriet Jacobs, Charles W. Chesnutt, George Washington Cable, Mary Wilkins Freeman, Sarah Orne Jewett, Henry James, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Kate Chopin, Jack London, Stephen Crane, Ernest Hemingway, and Robert Frost. Manageable reading assignments, one paper, quizzes, midterm and final exam.The Turn of the Screw (James)
Life in the Iron Mills (Davis)
The Red Badge of Courage (Crane)
Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (Jacobs)
Huckleberry Finn (Twain)
short stories by various authors
75
83011ENGL4720601Mark David Johnson (P)Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers - DE, wENGL6529OnlineApplied linguists wear a lot of different hats. The most important one is that of the language teacher. Through a review of language research and language-teaching methodologies, this course examines the field of Applied Linguistics and how it informs language instruction.
76
83013ENGL48901Brent R Henze (P)Practicum: Careers in Writing -wENGL6740TBAEnglish majors and minors who have performed well academically can earn course credit by completing 140 hours of communication-related work in a supervised work setting. In an internship, you’ll apply communication skills and knowledge in a professional workplace. You’ll gain practical workplace experience, but also build upon your existing knowledge through reflective practice and mentoring.
If you’re interested in a summer or fall internship, contact internship coordinator Brent Henze at TPCintern@ecu.edu to schedule an appointment.
77
85218ENGL48902Margaret D Bauer (P)Practicum: Careers in Writing: NC Literary ReviewTBADon't miss the opportunity to serve as an intern for the North Carolina Literary Review. Duties include participating in the production of the 2015 issue, submission/subscription management and other marketing activities, website development, and possibly grant applications.

Interns schedule 10 hours per week with NCLR (around their other class and work obligations) and receive 3.0 credit hours and their names on the masthead--which looks very good on job and graduate school applications. Also impressive on applications, interns have the opportunity to learn several new computer programs.

Interns must have strong writing and proofreading skills and be proficient at using Microsoft Word. Ingenuity and reliability are key; the rest is learn-as-you-go.

Please contact the editor, Dr. Margaret Bauer, via email (BauerM@ecu.edu) to set up an appointment to discuss your interest in joining the staff before enrolling in ENGL 4890, sec. 002.

For more information about this award-winning journal, go to: http://www.nclr.ecu.edu.
To find out more about the North Carolina Literary Review, go to:
http://www.nclr.ecu.edu
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83014ENGL49301Robert J Siegel (P)Film: Writer's Perspective -WITR02:00 pm-03:15 pmRather than teaching film from a theoretical or technical perspective, this course will analyze the screenwriter’s tools and how they are used to convey meaning through this medium. We will view films and read the screenplays of many of the films we watch to better understand how a film changes from script to final cut. We will also read interviews with screenwriters and conference call with a screenwriter. The last few years those conferences included Callie Khouri, screenwriter for Thelma and Louise , Kasi Lemmons, screenwriter for Eve’s Bayou, Sheldon Turner, Up In The Air, Allesandro Camon, The Messenger. Students will also adapt flash fiction (short, short stories) into film scenes. Annie Hall, Chinatown, Ordinary People, Antonia’s Line, Crimes and Misdemeanors, The Lives of Others.
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83016ENGL49502Laureen Tedesco (P)Literature for ChildrenMWF01:00 pm-01:50 pm
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83017ENGL49503Kenneth M Parille (P)Literature for ChildrenTR12:30 pm-01:45 pm
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83018ENGL4950601Laureen Tedesco (P)Literature for Children - DEOnline
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83019ENGL49991Erin Anne Frost (P)English Professional SeminarW11:00 am-11:50 amIn this 1-credit course designed for December 2014, May 2015, and August 2015 graduating seniors, you'll explore career and graduate school options; prepare resumes, cover letters, writing samples, and your senior portfolio; practice marketing yourself in digital contexts; and reflect on the skills you've developed as an English major.Brooks, You Majored in What?; Curran and Greenwald, Smart Moves for Liberal Arts Grads
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83021ENGL58501Liza A Wieland (P)Advanced Fiction Writing: Short StoriesW06:30 pm-09:30 pmIn this course, you will continue your happy entanglement with the short story. Students will write at least two short stories, which the class will discuss using the workshop method. In addition, we will read contemporary short stories and discussions of craft by the form's best practitioners.Best American Short Stories 2014
The Art of the Short Story, Dana Goia, ed.
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83022ENGL58601Donald Alexander Albright (P)Advanced Nonfiction WritingM06:30 pm-09:30 pmAn advanced workshop in creative nonfiction writing, designed for graduate student writers and advanced undergraduate writing majors: undergraduates should have earned an A or B in Engl. 3860 or have obtained permission from the instructor. Writers are expected to bring to the class above average writing skills, especially in descriptive and narrative writing, and an enthusiasm for actively participating in class discussions, workshops, and instruction. Essays may be written in a variety of genres of CNF, including reviews; travel & service articles; autobiography, biography, memoir; personal essays; place, history articles; profiles, interviews; or cultural criticism. --Recent "Best American Essays" collection, inexpensively available from Amazon
--On-line CNF journals Brevity and Junk
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83123ETHN20011Gera S Miles (P)Introduction to Ethnic Studies - GUMWF08:00 am-08:50 am
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83127ETHN20012Carla H Pastor (P)Introduction to Ethnic StudiesTR12:30 pm-01:45 pm
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83129ETHN20013Jessica Dawn Bardill (P)Introduction to Ethnic StudiesTR02:00 pm-03:15 pmThis course will explore ethnicity and race in the United States by examining our own experiences as well as literary and scholarly explorations of the concepts. Questions we will consider include: What are race and ethnicity, and how are they perceived in the U.S.? How have concepts of, policies toward, and treatment of ethnic groups changed over time? We will learn about the history and experiences of ethnic groups in the U.S., including African Americans, Latino/as, Native Americans, Asian Americans, and new immigrant groups. Our goal for the class will be to develop a critical framework that will enable us to better understand the past, present, and future of ethnicity in the U.S.Doing Race: 21 Essays for the 21st Century ed. Hazel Markus and Paula Moya
Literature, Race, and Ethnicity by Joseph Skerrett
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83136FILM29001Anna Froula (P)Introduction to Film Studies (Screenings)T06:30 pm-09:30 pm
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83136FILM29001Anna Froula (P)Introduction to Film StudiesTR09:30 am-10:45 amThis course is designed to introduce students to film studies. Students will examine a number of American and international films from various critical perspectives. Students will have the opportunity to explore such topics as cinematography, editing, acting, film history, film theory, the relationship between film and culture, film as art, film as business, and film and technology.Modern Times (Charlie Chaplin, 1936), Hot Fuzz (Edgar Wright, 2007), The Searchers (John Ford, 1954), Night of the Living Dead (George A. Romero, 1968), The Hurt Locker (Katherine Bigelow, 2009), Inside Man (Spike Lee, 2006)
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83138FILM29002Randall Thomson Martoccia (P)Introduction to Film Studies (Screenings)M06:30 pm-09:30 pm
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83138FILM29002Randall Thomson Martoccia (P)Introduction to Film StudiesMWF11:00 am-11:50 am
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83153FILM39001Amanda A Klein (P)American & International Film History, Part ITR12:30 pm-01:45 pmThis course is a broad survey of the major films, genres, regulatory bodies and economic structures that defined cinema, both American and international, from its inception in the mid- 1890s through the onset of World War II. The course will address the social, industrial, and aesthetic history of these films, studying how they were made, sold, and exhibited in theaters. Students will begin the course by focusing on the technological and social changes that led to the development of the cinema and how later developments, such as the coming of sound and the development of various international studio systems, impacted the medium. While the major concern of this course is to understand these films in terms of their historical context, studies will also examine specific formal, narrative and rhetorical choices made by the individual films and filmmakers. Within Our Gates (1920, Oscar Micheaux)
Der Letzte Mann [The Last Laugh] (1924, F.W. Murnau)
It (1927, Clarence J. Badger)
I am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang (1932, Mervyn LeRoy)
Ukikusa monogatari [A Story of Floating Weeds](1934, Yaujiro Ozu)
Reefer Madness (1938, Louis J. Gasnier)
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83159FILM49801Amanda A Klein (P)Topics in Film Aesthetics: Trash CinemaTR02:00 pm-03:15 pmThough most film studies courses strive to provide students with the accepted canon of “quality films” like Citizen Kane and Casablanca, this course is focused on those texts existing on the margins of good taste. As a course on film aesthetics we will discuss what qualities categorize a film as “trash,” “bad,” “low brow” or “cult” and how taste cultures are established. We will discuss which films are rich with “cultural capital” and why and how trash cinema rewrites the rules about which films are worth watching. This course will also serve as an introduction to Hollywood’s production history, reception studies, and film analysis. The course will be capped with a class project in which the students will be asked to organize, advertise and run a screening of the contemporary cult film, The Room (2003, Tommy Wiseau).Eraserhead (1977, David Lynch), Pink Flamingos (1972, John Waters), Blacula (1972, William Crain), Bad Girls Go to Hell (1965, Doris Wishman), Blood Feast (1963, Herschell Gordon Lewis), Freaks (1932, Tod Browning), The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975, Jim Sharman),
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