CHS STEM ACTIVITY LOG (Responses)
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TimestampTeacher NameDateSubjectClassTopicActivity DescriptionStandardResources/Technology UsedLinks/Access to information about lesson
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9/15/2015 7:35:19Jennifer Sewell8/14/2015SciencePre-AP BiologyScientific MethodStudents were given paperclips, rubberbands, copy paper and construction paper and told to design a lab that walked through the steps of the scientific method. They were to come up with a question and answer it. They could ask and answer any question as long as they used the materials given to them. They did not have to use all materials but could not add any to them.SCSh1. Students will evaluate the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism
in science.
a. Exhibit the above traits in their own scientific activities.
b. Recognize that different explanations often can be given for the same evidence.
c. Explain that further understanding of scientific problems relies on the design and
execution of new experiments which may reinforce or weaken opposing explanations.

SCSh3. Students will identify and investigate problems scientifically.
a. Suggest reasonable hypotheses for identified problems.
b. Develop procedures for solving scientific problems.
c. Collect, organize and record appropriate data.
Major Concepts/ Skills: Concepts/Skills to Maintain:
Classification to the Characteristics of Science
Six Kingdom level Records investigations clearly and accurately
Matter-Energy Relationships Uses scientific tools
Cellular Function and Structure Interprets graphs, tables, and charts
DNA/RNA Writes clearly
Homeostasis Uses proper units
Plant/Animal Characteristics Organizes data into graphs, tables, and charts
Genes and Successive Generations Analyzes scientific data via calculations and inference
Heredity Uses models
Ecosystems Asks quality questions
Biological Evolution Uses technology
Uses safety techniques
Recognizes the importance of explaining data with
precision and accuracy
Revised July 13, 2006
Georgia Department of Education
Kathy Cox, State Superintendent of Schools
8/20/2008 4:35 PM Page 4 of 7
All Rights Reserved
d. Graphically compare and analyze data points and/or summary statistics.
e. Develop reasonable conclusions based on data collected.
f. Evaluate whether conclusions are reasonable by reviewing the process and checking
against other available information.
Students had access to notes given on the scientific method.
Other than materials given, students also had access to rulers, meter sticks, timers (most used their phone) and calculators.
Students used prior knowledge from physical science if they chose to measure speed.
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9/15/2015 7:58:56Jennifer Sewell9/24/2015SciencePre-AP BiologySurface TensionStudents were to measure surface tension by counting drops of water on a penny. They compared how surface tension changed when materials, such as soap, were added to water. Students graphed results, calculated averages and explained how the drops of water on the penny represented cohesion, adhesion and surface tension.SCSh3. Students will identify and investigate problems scientifically.
a. Suggest reasonable hypotheses for identified problems.
b. Develop procedures for solving scientific problems.
c. Collect, organize and record appropriate data.
d. Graphically compare and analyze data points and/or summary statistics.
e. Develop reasonable conclusions based on data collected.
f. Evaluate whether conclusions are reasonable by reviewing the process and checking
against other available information.

SCSh4. Students use tools and instruments for observing, measuring, and manipulating
scientific equipment and materials.
a. Develop and use systematic procedures for recording and organizing information.
b. Use technology to produce tables and graphs.
c. Use technology to develop, test, and revise experimental or mathematical models.

SCSh6. Students will communicate scientific investigations and information clearly.
a. Write clear, coherent laboratory reports related to scientific investigations.

SB1. Students will analyze the nature of the relationships between structures and functions
in living cells.
d. Explain the impact of water on life processes (i.e., osmosis, diffusion).
Notes if need on properties of water.
Beaker with water
Beaker with soap water
Pipette
Calculator
Penny
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9/15/2015 8:07:58Jennifer Sewell9/3/2015SciencePre-AP BiologyMacromoleculesStudents used Play-Doh and toothpicks to construct models of the monomers of the four macromolecules. Students used different colors of Play-Doh to represent each element (carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and phosphorus) and toothpicks to represent the bonds between elements. SCSh1. Students will evaluate the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism
in science.
a. Exhibit the above traits in their own scientific activities.

SB1. Students will analyze the nature of the relationships between structures and functions
in living cells.
c. Identify the function of the four major macromolecules (i.e., carbohydrates, proteins, lipids)
Macromolecule Notes
For pre-lab, students watched the Ameoba Sisters Video on YouTube pertaining to macromolecules and filled out a graphic organizer that told the function, elements, monomer and example of each macromolecule.
Toothpicks
Play-Doh (various colors)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJ7xOSCEmZw (Video)

http://www.amoebasisters.com/uploads/2/1/9/0/21902384/video_recap_of_biomolecules_by_amoeba_sisters.pdf (Handout)
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9/15/2015 12:26:56Kasey Austin9/3/2015STEM
Engineering Applications
Charles Law//Hot Air Balloons
Students will learn about pressure, volume and temperature and how it relates to Charles Law. Students will calculate the mass of a balloon when given temperatures. They will provide real life examples, talk about greenhouse gases and model a design of their hot air balloon in Inventor. Students will brainstorm different techniques, materials, and fuel sources needed to build a sky lantern (miniature hot air balloon). The balloons will be tested and the lift will be recorded for further data analysis. STEM-EA-2
Demonstrate and follow safety, health, and environmental standards related to the
STEM workplace and apply specific engineering tools, machines, materials and
processes in a safe and orderly manner to formulate, analyze, and verify engineering
practices and solutions.
STEM-EA-4
Apply knowledge of the engineering design process to solve engineering/
technological problems in the STEM workplace
STEM-EA-8
Develop appropriate models.
STEM-EA-9
Design and construct a testable prototype.
SCSh5. Students will demonstrate the computation and estimation skills necessary for
analyzing data and developing reasonable scientific explanations.
Software: AutoDesk Inventor, Excel

Materials: Tissue paper, bamboo, tape, glue, candles

Worksheets that have Charles Law practice problems
https://prezi.com/ls2wjdxptnk2/charles-law/
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9/20/2015 11:18:17John Ellison8/11/2015Math
Honors Coordinate Algebra
Using Expressions to Represent Quantities
Acquiring Elephants for the San Diego Zoo
MGSE9-12.N.Q.2 Define appropriate quantities for the purpose of descriptive modeling. Given a situation, context, or problem, students will determine, identify, and use appropriate quantities for representing the situation.
MGSE9-12.A.SSE.1 Interpret expressions that represent a quantity in terms of its context.
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxSPCOD-m86KYlg0Q3RKZmpFLWM/view?usp=sharing
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9/20/2015 11:22:38John Ellison8/18/2015Math
Honors Coordinate Algebra
Industry Standards, Blood Pressure, Archeology
Solving real-world problems with expressions, equations, and inequalities
MGSE9-12.A.CED.1 Create equations and inequalities in one variable and use them to solve problems. Include equations arising from linear, quadratic, simple rational, and exponential functions (integer inputs only).
MGSE9-12.A.CED.2 Create linear, quadratic, and exponential equations in two or more variables to represent relationships between quantities; graph equations on coordinate axes with labels and scales. (The phrase “in two or more variables” refers to formulas like the compound interest formula, in which A = P(1 + r/n)nt has multiple variables.)
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxSPCOD-m86KSlFud1J3dUpaTVE/view?usp=sharing
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9/20/2015 11:27:18John Ellison9/1/2015Math
Honors Coordinate Algebra
Precision, Accuracy, and Tolerance
Using tolerance statements to define acceptable levels of error for industry
MGSE9-12.N.Q.3 Choose a level of accuracy appropriate to limitations on measurement when reporting quantities. For example, money situations are generally reported to the nearest cent (hundredth). Also, an answers’ precision is limited to the precision of the data given.
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxSPCOD-m86KM1Y1a3FUYktLTHM/view?usp=sharing
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9/20/2015 11:37:17John Ellison9/28/2015Math
Honors Coordinate Algebra
Literal Equations
Solving formulas for a given variable in a construction company context
MGSE9-12.A.CED.4 Rearrange formulas to highlight a quantity of interest using the same reasoning as in solving equations. Examples: Rearrange Ohm’s law V = IR to highlight resistance R; Rearrange area of a circle formula A = π r2 to highlight the radius r.
MGSE9-12.A.REI.3 Solve linear equations and inequalities in one variable including equations with coefficients represented by letters. For example, given ax + 3 = 7, solve for x.
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxSPCOD-m86KR3BNRElJa0hDWXc/view?usp=sharing
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9/22/2015 8:44:13Tim Hawig9/28/2015HL IB Biology4A
Topic 8.2 Photosynthesis
S: : Lab assessing rate of photosynthesis Light dependent reaction
T: TI-73 calculator attached to a CBR data collection device - Light sensor probe being used to assess various light levels during the experiment
E: The students will be challenged to maximize the speed of the reaction with distance to light as the primary variable
M: Light probe will calculate an exact value for the lab device used and in turn export the graph to a computer. The rate is measured in time of a circular plant disc to raise in a sealed container.
Topic 8.2 Photosynthesis
Photosynthesis occurs in the chloroplasts within which two areas are structured to support the two chemical reactions that must take place. They are the light dependent reaction and the light independent reaction known as Calvin’s cycle. Know the reactants and the products of these two chemical reactions and where they take place within the chloroplasts.

Essential idea: Light energy is converted into chemical energy.
Photosynthesis Lab
TI-73 Probe wear - Light sensor
IB New Curriculum reference:
https://ibpublishing.ibo.org/server2/rest/app/tsm.xql?doc=d_4_biolo_gui_1402_1_e&part=4&chapter=2
Example;
http://www.edu.pe.ca/gray/class_pages/smaccormack/leaf_disc_photosynthesis_write_up.pdf
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9/30/2015 12:08:42Jennifer Sewell9/28/2015SciencePre-AP BiologyOsmosis
Students used a gummy bear to represent a cell. The initial height, width and mass of the gummy bear was recorded before the gummy bear was placed in a solution of distilled water. The gummy bear was in the water for around 24 hours. The next class the students measured the the new height, width and mass and calculated the percent change. This activity is an example to show what happens to cells when they are in a hypotonic solution.
SCSh1. Students will evaluate the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism
in science.
a. Exhibit the above traits in their own scientific activities.

SCSh2. Students will use standard safety practices for all classroom laboratory and field
investigations.
a. Follow correct procedures for use of scientific apparatus.
b. Demonstrate appropriate technique in all laboratory situations.

SCSh3. Students will identify and investigate problems scientifically.
a. Suggest reasonable hypotheses for identified problems.
b. Develop procedures for solving scientific problems.
c. Collect, organize and record appropriate data.
d. Graphically compare and analyze data points and/or summary statistics.
e. Develop reasonable conclusions based on data collected.
f. Evaluate whether conclusions are reasonable by reviewing the process and checking
against other available information.

SCSh6. Students will communicate scientific investigations and information clearly.
a. Write clear, coherent laboratory reports related to scientific investigations.

SB1. Students will analyze the nature of the relationships between structures and functions
in living cells.
a. Explain the role of cell organelles for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, including
the cell membrane, in maintaining homeostasis and cell reproduction.
d. Explain the impact of water on life processes (i.e., osmosis, diffusion).
Ameoba Sisters Video: Osmosis
Phone/Calculator
Triple Beam Balance
Classroom Notes via Promethean
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10/4/2015 9:11:33Ellison10/6/2016Mathematics
Honors Coordinate Algebra
Compound Inequalities
During the instructional process for compound inequalities, students will solve application problems involving the medical field (Diabetes) and industry (Tolerances).
MCC9-12.A.REI.3 Solve linear equations and inequalities in one variable, including equations with coefficients represented by letters. For example, given ax + 3 = 7, solve for x.
calculators
https://drive.google.com/a/carrolltoncityschools.net/file/d/0BxSPCOD-m86KVVpxdU5vNFUzTXc/view?usp=sharing
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10/20/2015 14:59:19Swindle/Barrett10/20/2015Forensic Science2A/3A/4A-2B/4BForensic Anthropology
The students will use algebra to determine height of a victim from a skeletal profile using the length of the femur and humerus bones.
SFS1d-Students will evaluate the relevance of possible evidence at the site of an investigation.
Tables With equations/Calculators to solve algebraic equations
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10/21/2015 8:04:06Jennifer Sewell10/16/2015SciencePre-AP BiologyPhotosynthesis
As an introduction to photosynthesis students performed a leaf chromatography lab to understand that there are other pigments besides chlorophyll within a leaf. The used a green leaf, isopropyl alcohol, chromatography paper and time lapse video recording to watch the chlorophyll and other pigments (carotenoids and anthocyanins) separate from each other.
SB3a.Explain the cycling of energy through the processes of photosynthesis and cell respiration.
GREEEN leaf
Chromatography Paper
Video recording device for time lapse (phone)
Amoeba Sisters Video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uixA8ZXx0KU&list=PLwL0Myd7Dk1FSaR_m7q9kOvm3h2cgCAXT
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10/30/2015 21:39:32Tim HawigPre-AP Biology4BCell Respiration
Vernier Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide probes on loan from the University of West Georgia were used in collecting the appropriate gases emitted from germinated mung bean seeds to show evidence of cell respiration by plant cells. Students had to follow a scientific procedure, collect data, analyze data and create conclusions based on the evidence.
SB3.a. Explain the cycling of energy through the processes of photosynthesis and respiration.
Vernier Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide sensors / probes
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10/30/2015 21:47:28Tim Hawig10/28/2015CP/Pre-AP Biology2A,3B,4BCell Respiration
Manipulatives were used by students to create a 6 carbon sugar molecule using pegs and plastic fasteners representing chemical bonds. After this initial creation of glucose, they followed the three steps of cell respiration as it breaks down the sugar into ATP(energy) while it consumes oxygen and releases carbon dioxide represented by further manipulatives placed in a spent/produced cup. To keep track of ATP production, pennies are used as energy currency. Location of the three processes are used by placing the manipulatives on the appropriate location of the map of a cell.
SB3.a. Explain the cycling of energy through the processes of photosynthesis and respiration.
Hands on manipulatives: pegs, plastic connectors, 2 different colored marbles, 2 cups and a map of the cell.
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10/30/2015 22:02:15Tim Hawig10/14/2015IB SL Biology2B
DNA structure and replication
Students had their own set of K'NEX hands on manipulatives that are used to create the true molecular structure of DNA. The model represents Watson and Cricks realization of DNA structure in 1953. Students then go through the process of unzipping and creating complimentary strands of DNA to represent DNA replication.
2.7 DNA structure and replication SL IB BiologyKNEX DNA Replication and Transcription
http://www.knex.com/shop/16790/dna-replication-transcription/
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12/2/2015 15:23:48Hawig, Tim12/2/2015Biology
CP (2A,3A,3B) PreAP (4B)
SB4.c Succession
Exploration of Lichen - part fungus (that provides shelter/home) for part Algae (which provides food/glucose being photosynthetic). Students explore the characteristics of Lichen by illustrating the various shapes, colors and structural components that allows the symbiotic relationship to be maintained and succession to occur.
SB4. Students will assess the dependence of all organisms on one another and the flow of energy and matter within their ecosystems.
c. Relate environmental conditions to successional changes in ecosystems. LICHEN is a Pioneer species and indicator of Primary Succession

a. Investigate the relationships among organisms, populations, communities,ecosystems, and biomes.(DUE TO LICHEN BEING in a Symbiotic Relationship & a Pioneer Species)
Technical equipment: magnifying glass, bifocal observation lenses, microscope slides, probes, water bottle with droppers
Biotic materials: sticks with lichen and mosses present
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12/8/2015 16:14:44Tim Hawig12/7/2015SL IB Biology2BTopic 3.3 Meiosis
SL IB Biology students had to explore models and past student creative art work on Meiosis to determine the sequencing of the process.
Part 1 - Meiosis models were mixed up and placed on a table. The group of students gathered around this table and as a student-centered and led team come up with a logical order of the visual representations of the phases of Meiosis (Interphase //- Prophase - Metaphase -Anaphase - Telophase // Cytokinesis --- part I PMAT followed by part II)

Part 2 - Creative art of all phases were placed out of order on another table - students had to place in the logical order and then can see the naming sequence.

This was an engaging way to logically distinguish the steps of how one cell becomes four gametes (sex cells).

Conclusion of lesson: Part 3 - Various individual artistic expressions of a phase was scattered on a table with a simple note to name the phase - answers were noted underneath tag for individual check of understanding.
Topic 3: Genetics/ Meiosis: Drawing diagrams to show the stages of meiosis resulting in the formation of four haploid cells.
Meiosis Model Set (mixed up).
Past Creative expressions of the phases of Meiosis.
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12/8/2015 16:21:18Tim Hawig12/2/2015CP Biology2ASymbiosis
EL students trying to understand and read for the different types of symbiotic relationships (Mutualism - Commensalism - Parasitism) were given written stories of examples in nature. The stories were quite difficult for your average reader, so cell phone app "Speak to Translate" was used. Student translators that knew English read the story in English outloud, and then were asked to summarize what the story was trying to tell. The summary was than read in English to the cell phone app - which in 30 sec translated into the EL students native tongue. Then the team of students could together determine which of the three types of symbiotic relationships best fit the story.
SB4. Students will assess the dependence of all organisms on one another and the flow of energy and matter within their ecosystems.
a. Investigate the relationships among organisms, populations, communities,ecosystems, and biomes
"Speak to Translate" cell phone app. $10 fee for unlimited translations.
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/speak-translate-free-live/id804641004?mt=8
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/speak-translate-free-live/id804641004?mt=8
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1/8/2016 10:24:18Tim1/6/2016SL IB Biology2B3.4 Inheritance
In learning various vocabulary needed to demonstrate the evidence discovered by Mendelian Genetics, students were given identification cards containing two traits. Crossing two parents with mixed genetic codes, they worked as a team to determine the probability of what traits the offspring might demonstrate. The giant "gameboard" allowed all members of the team to participate, assisting in each other in misconceptions, and resulting in finding the magic ratio that Gregor Mendel found.
Nature of science:
Making quantitative measurements with replicates to ensure reliability. Mendel’s genetic crosses with pea plants generated numerical data. (3.2)
Skill: Construction of Punnett grids for predicting the outcomes of monohybrid genetic crosses.
Giant laminated Dihybrid board and numerous identification cards to decipher which are used in certain crosses.
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1/8/2016 10:33:07Tim Hawig1/8/2016SL IB Biology2B
3.5 Genetic Modification and Biotechnology
Students experience equipment used in biotechnology (specifically PCR). They were guided in overarching themes that were then used in an online Virtual lab. This lab gave exposure to many pieces of technology used to differentiate DNA segments, with emphasis on PCR, a copying technique often used. The lab guides students to determine through matching sequences of the DNA code to a data base. They get an individual result depending on their sample DNA with a percent match in the real world identification of that species.
Understandings:
PCR can be used to amplify small amounts of DNA.
DNA profiling involves comparison of DNA.
Related:
Application: Use of DNA profiling in paternity and forensic investigations.
Demonstrations of equipment: micropipettes, sterile transfer wands
http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/bacterial-identification-virtual-lab
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2/4/2016 22:05:57Tim Hawig2/4/2016IB BiologySL and HL IB
Topic 4 Ecological Systems
IB students gather mud from local Buffalo Creek to create Winogradsky columns. They packed layers of mud with newspaper as a carbon source and egg yolks as sulfer. In the next few weeks layers of different bacteria will make themselves visible as various colors. The ecosystem in a box will be studied for its separation of aerobic vs. anaerobic autotrophs. The lab was preceded by an animated sequence outlining the bacteria that will hopefully be illustrated in the real life columns.
Mesocosm Required Lab
Winogradsky Lab protocal
Winogradsky animated sequence
Local mud, buckets, trowel, newspaper, plastic bottles, transparent sealant, eggs, measuring cups, tape, labels
http://www.sumanasinc.com/webcontent/animations/content/winogradsky.html
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2/4/2016 22:12:30Tim Hawig1/19/2016BiologyCP,PreAP
DNA-RNA-Protein Synthesis
Students are provided information on an mystery animal. To determine which animal they have, they have to take the 6 sections of DNA given to them (which represents a gene) and transcribe them into corresponding mRNA fragments. They then use a coding chart to determine a sequence of amino acids. These series of amino acids then determine a trait such as hairy, 4 legged or feline. Six traits are then used to create the animal.

SB2.a. Distinguish between DNA and RNA.
b. Explain the role of DNA in storing and transmitting cellular information
I created a variety of animals based off 6 major traits that make them recognizable.
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3/7/2016 21:45:41Tim Hawig2/26/2016SL IB BiologySL and HL IBTopic 5.3 Classification
Graphic Organizer completion of the 4 plant phyla and 7 animal phyla required by the IB. Students than used this tool to "see" the actual organisms with in sets or groups. Over 200 organisms were used for students to gain a visual representation of each phyla.
Topic 5 Identification of characteristics of plant and animal phyla within the modern classification system of binomial nomenclature.
Over 200 preserved specimens of animal and plant phyla
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3/7/2016 21:49:41Tim Hawig3/3/2016SL IB BiologySL and HL IBTopic 5.1 Evolution
Stations lab where students work through various exercises such as determining the use of a geiger counter (radiometic carbon dating), the fossil record including index fossils, fossil fuel creation and there connection to solid concentration of CO2 and its release into the atmosphere triggering increasing global warming, and a tree ring analysis for aging specimens.
Topic 5.1 Understand how the fossil record is used to support the theory of evolution.
Various fossils, a geiger counter, coal and various rock specimens.
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3/15/2016 21:46:07Tim Hawig3/14/2016SL IB BiologySL and HL IBTopic 6.1 Digestion
Students were given a piece of bovine small intestine to dissect. They first gathered their materials from open sets: scalpel, scissors, probe, tweezers to name a few. Challenged to feel the texture of smooth involuntary muscle that runs circular and longitudinal (key aspects of the new 2016 curriculum).
Topic 6.1 Digestion: examine the structure to function of the small intestine's outer lining to the villi and microvilli protruberances that increase the surface area for nutrient absorption.
small intestine (Walmart meat dept)
latex or vinyl gloves (plus some good disinfectant when complete!)
standard dissection kits and tray
guts... pun!
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8/6/2016 22:08:34Tim Hawig8/4/2016IB SL Biology2A
Topic 1.1 Intro cells, 6.2 Blood system
After lab safety guidelines were presented by the students in a performance based situation they were able to apply techniques of safe use of equipment in the inquiry dissection of sheep hearts. Other goals were to become aware of the complex specialization of cells working together and their ability to maintain life/homeostasis.
1.1 Specialized tissues can develop by cell differentiation in multicellular organisms.
6.2 The heart beat is initiated by a group of specialized muscle cells in the right atrium called the sinoatrial node.
Dissection equipment and sheep hearts.
IB Biology 2016 Curriculum guide:
https://ibpublishing.ibo.org/server2/rest/app/tsm.xql?doc=d_4_biolo_gui_1402_1_e&part=3&chapter=1
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8/19/2016 15:09:01Bryson/Grubbs8/5/2016EnglishWorld LiteratureGoogle Classroom
Created and require all students to join and use GClassroom throughout the semester to keep up with missed work, review class notes/activities, read informational articles relating to literature, have 24/7 access to all handouts/forms/learning opportunities available, practice writing skills, practice reading skills, engage with different mediums via technology to prepare for higher levels of learning and education
RL4: Determine meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text
RI7: Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums
W6: Use technology, including Internet, to produce, publish, and update writing; take advantage of technology to link to other info.
SL1a: Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material uner study.
L5: Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
Students Smartphones, Chromebooks, home computers, Google Classroom app, classroom computers, Prometheus board
https://classroom.google.com/r/MTYxNzk0ODg2Nlpa
https://classroom.google.com/c/MTYxODE1MjYwNlpa
https://classroom.google.com/c/MTYxODYzNDA2MFpa
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8/19/2016 15:14:18Bryson/Grubbs8/19/2016EnglishWorld Literature
Parent classroom involvment
World Lit teachers have volunteered to be a part of the Pilot Program for new features for Google Classroom.
Features include:
Inviting all parents/guardians to receive a weekly update on progress of student, as well as customized emails allowing them access to all reading material and classroom activities so that they may learn, grow and actively participate in their child's learning.
Ability to annotate documents to be prepared for class discussions
Ability to now DRAW visual concepts rather than just write!
RL4: Determine meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text
RI7: Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums
W6: Use technology, including Internet, to produce, publish, and update writing; take advantage of technology to link to other info.
SL1a: Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material uner study.
L5: Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
Smartphones, home computers, Media Center Computers, Chrome Books
https://classroom.google.com/c/MTYxODYzNDA2MFpa
https://classroom.google.com/c/MTYxNzk0ODg2Nlpa
https://classroom.google.com/c/MTYxODE1MjYwNlpa
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8/24/2016 12:38:21Bryson/Grubbs8/24/2016EnglishWorld LiteratureHolocaust
Using new Annotate feature in GClassroom to interpret and locate varying main ideas in long informational text article
RL5: Analyze impact of word choice
SL1d: Respond thoughtfully to diverse prespectives
Media Center computers, Google Classroom, Smartphones, Chrome Books
https://classroom.google.com/c/MTYxODYzNDA2MFpa
https://classroom.google.com/c/MTYxODE1MjYwNlpa
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12/14/2016 8:12:31Kimberly Cooper12/14/2016MathAnalytic GeometryProbability
Students conducted a survey of 40 people. The data was represented in a Venn Diagram and probabilities were calculated. Students were also required to explain what the probabilities meant in terms of the topic they surveyed.
MGSE9-12.S.CP.1 Describe categories of events as subsets of a sample space using unions, intersections, or complements of other events (or, and, not).
Students used social media to survey people.
https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B3Zuu3e41YqZbUZRX3lsd3phN2M

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B3Zuu3e41YqZOC1nRlBMc3RUMU0
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4/18/2017 11:08:34Bradford-Hunt1/3/2017Chemistry1st and 2nd block
Introduction to Chemistry
Students create a tetrahedron by folding paper. Ultimately, this represents the structure of a diamond and allows an introduction into bonding and discussion of types of bonds and how chemical structure affects the properties of the substances.
SC1 Students will analyze the nature of matter and its classifications.
SC3 Students will use the modern atomic theory to explain the characteristics of atoms.
e. Compare and contrast types of chemical bonds (i.e. ionic, covalent).
Paper, scissors, and tape
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4/18/2017 11:22:49Kimberly Cooper2/27/2017Analytic Geometry
Honors Analytic Geometry
Quadratic Functions
Students designed their own application problem. They were required to design a Real World context that could be modeled by a quadratic function. Students then posed three questions that could be solved. (i.e. when with ball hit the ground, how long will the ball be in the air)
MGSE9-12.A.CED.1 Create equations and inequalities in one variable and use them to solve problems.
Include equations arising from quadratic equations.
MGSE9-12.A.CED.2 Create quadratic equations in two or more variables to represent relationships between quantities; graph equations on coordinate axes with labels and scales.
MGSE9-12.A.REI.4 Solve quadratic equations in one variable.
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4/18/2017 12:23:11Bryson2/6/2017ELAPreAP World LitHolocaust
While reading novel, "Night", students created a collage based upon art work by Holocaust artist David Olere. After using the internet to research the artist, the students picked one pieces of his art to write an narrative extended response from the view point of a person in the picture. After writing the piece, students created their own digital work of art using sensory language from their response and making a collage around the Olere image.
RL5: Analyze structure of text
W4: Clear coherent writing
SL2: Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse format and media
Computers in Media Center
Internet
http://guthgafa.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Gracias.jpg Day 3
http://fcit.usf.edu/holocaust/resource/gallery/olere.htm#D57
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4/18/2017 12:43:35David Bryson3/23/2017ELAPreAP & CP World Lit
Reading & Critical Thinking
Using ReadTheory.org, students took a pre-assessment to gauge Lexile level and reading comprehension by grade level. ReadTheory takes the five CCGPS Standards and puts into three categories which assess critical thinking skills. The practice is free of charge and used once a week for 45 minutes. Lexile scores have improved 20% after 3 weeks of use. Excellent method of learning how to read informational text and determining specific and assumed meaning while reading.
RI1: cite strong and through textual evidence to support analysis.
RI4: determine meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings.
RI6: determine author's point of view; analyze use of rhetoric.
RI9: analyze seminal US documents of historical and literary significance.
Chrome Cart
Promethius board
internet
Desktop computer
https://readtheory.org/
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/11YleGGc-qgAQ8WSRuzy5wt3ogNdb4eJ5BXEou2qMk9E/edit#slide=id.g1d3d050e2a_0_0 Day 4 for last 6 weeks of semester
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4/18/2017 13:25:59Jeff Sharp4/18/2017Economics507Exchange Rate
Used the Promethean Board to translate 11 different currencies from around the world to U.S. Dollars.
SSEIN2
Promethean Board
Internet
Cell Phone
Currencies from around the world.
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4/18/2017 13:40:47N.Chetti/M. HookAm. LitCP and Pre-AP
Red Scare Crucible connection
In groups, students completed a multi-media research project that involved finding the connection between the Salem Witch Trails and the Red Scare. This presented in class in preparation for reading The Crucible.
ELAGPS11-12SL5: Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
ELAGPS11-12W7: Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation
Computers/Power Points/Prezi/Google Slides
Examples and the project are on my Google Drive
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5/5/2017 11:49:20Kathy Sheriff5/5/2017Health Careers
Introduction to Healthcare Science
Individual health career research
Students conducted research exploring a health career of their choice and created a presentation per rubric.
IHS-4 Development of a career plan
Onetonline.org; bls.gov; college websites; healthcare institutions/ Chrome Books
Introduction to Healthcare Science/ Health Careers in Google Drive
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5/5/2017 11:54:20Kathy Sheriff5/5/2017Anatomy & Physiology
Essentials of Healthcare Science
Disorders/Pathophysiology
Research specific disorder including prevalence and epidemiology and create a presentation per rubric; students required to take notes on peer presentations
Multiple standards covered Various scholarly websites/Chrome Books
Google Classroom/Essentials of Healthcare Science
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5/5/2017 11:58:18Laura Rader4/28/2017MathAP Calculus
Parametric Curve Lengths
Calculate the length of the track of a roller coaster (Six Flags Field Trip)
Length of a Parametric CurveCalculator / Field Trip
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5/5/2017 11:59:52Laura Rader4/28/2017MathIB Mathematics SL
Volume as Area Under a Curve
Calculate the volume of a section of the flume on the Log Ride (Six Flags field trip)
Calculus - Integral ApplicationsCalculator / Six Flags field trip
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5/5/2017 13:11:02Noah Brewer2/6/2017Language Arts
AP Language/American Lit
Rhetorical Analysis
Students use digital editing tools to create a video analysis of a popular music video.
ELAGSE11-12RI1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
ELAGSE11-12RI2 Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.
ELAGSE11-12RI6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness, or beauty of the text.
ELAGSE11-12SL4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.
ELAGSE11-12SL5 Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio,visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
Computer, Microphone, Video Editing Software (iMovie, Windows Movie Maker)
https://sites.google.com/carrolltoncityschools.net/pop-song-analysis-project/home
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5/5/2017 13:13:09Brewer5/5/2017Language ArtsAP Lang/American LitArgument Writing
Students write ongoing blog posts on a theme of their choice for a public audience
ELAGSE11-12W1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
ELAGSE11-12W2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
ELAGSE11-12W4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development,organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
ELAGSE11-12W6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback,including new arguments or information.
ELAGSE11-12W10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research,reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes,and audiences.
Computer, Blogging Platform (Blogger, Wordpress)
https://sites.google.com/carrolltoncityschools.net/ela-blogging/home
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5/5/2017 13:18:26Brewer3/31/2017Theory of KnowledgeTheory of Knowledge 1Human Sciences
Multimodal Ethnography - Students will construct a narrative argument video exploring a particular subculture or cultural practice.
Computer, video camera, microphone, video editing software (iMovie, Windows Movie Maker
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1pvrgwSs8ichg6WUR1nAI4fFA6oNIEUJRtYh_l_OfYEw/edit?usp=sharing
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5/5/2017 13:22:12Brewer3/1/2017IB Theory of knowledge
IB Theory of Knowledge 1
Natural Sciences
Students were broken up into teams and presented with a black shoe box that contained some unspecified items. Each team was given time to plan a set of experiments to determine the contents of the box. Then, experiments were carried out, and teams were asked to construct the most accurate description of the box and its contents. At the end, teams presented their findings and justified their conclusions with evidence from experimentation. The box was NEVER OPENED!!
Shoe box. Mystery items
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1CWApVtEv8qEwCbcvzj-_j-PH5IFDQ7ySdYZi7EVwGpo/edit?usp=sharing
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5/5/2017 14:26:19
Kristie Bradford-Hunt
2/3/2017SciencePre AP Chemistry
Average atomic mass calculations
Students utilize different types of M&Ms to simulate the mass spectrometer used to separate and count atoms based on their masses. Use plain, peanut, and almond M&Ms to represent three different "isotopes" of M&Mium. They count out and calculate the average mass based on the total amount of M&Ms and their masses.
SC3d Explain the relationship of isotopes to the relative abundance of atoms of a particular element.
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5/5/2017 14:34:00
Kristie Bradford-Hunt
2/9/2017SciencePre AP chemistry
Periodic Trends on the periodic Table
Students create a three dimensional model to represent one of the periodic trends, atomic radii, ionic radii, ionization energy, or electronegativity. Once they have developed the three dimensional model utilizing straws to represent values for the trend they have to present their findings to the class and explain how the increase or decrease across a period and down a group affect the different properties of the elements including but not limited to how they will react with other substances.
SC4b - Compare and contrast trends in the chemical and physical properties of elements and their placement on the Periodic Table.
interactive periodic table app recommended (if they have an iphone) but they can use any resource they would like
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/interactive-periodic-table-of-elements-by-popar/id688910951?mt=8
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5/5/2017 14:40:123/21/2017SciencePre AP chemistryMolecular Modeling
Students utilize string and pHet interactive website to determine the shapes of molecules and how those shapes help determine the polarity and properties of the molecules.
SC1 b and SC6 a Compare and contrast atomic/molecular motion in solids, liquids, gases, and plasmas.
https://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/molecule-shapes
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5/10/2017 16:16:22Jeanne Swindle5/10/2017BiotechnolgyAP BiologyGel Electrophoresis
Students will use the Carolina Introductory Gel Electrophoresis equipment to complete a DNA profile of simulated DNA. They will observe the movement of the molecules through the gel and compare knowns to unknowns for identification.
SB2-Uses of DNA technology in forensics, medicine, and agriculture.
Carolina Introductory Gel Electrophoresis
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9/15/2017 22:00:32Tim Hawig9/15/2017Ecology3rd and 4th
Predator - Prey Graph Relationships
Student led activity of a simulation of real Georgia predator population that fluctuates in a pattern with the corresponding prey population
SEC1. d. Relate the role of natural selection to organismal adaptations that are specific to their habitats and describe some examples of coevolution.
Predator cut outs that could be modified in size depending on Habitat space needed, also included the binomial nomenclature for opening discussion
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ue4Ta3YrsgqnWZHG9_QF-wqhq4wGerq2gSWegFij55I/edit
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9/15/2017 22:05:48Tim Hawig9/15/2017IB Biology HLHL 2nd block
Cellular Biology Round table Review
Students circulated to 7 different stations of cell review of topics including: organelle-function, cell transport mechanisms and prokaryotic vs. eukaryotic
Topic 1.1-1.4 Ultrastructure of cells and Membrane Transport
7 stations, each having its own set of matching/organizing game-like activities
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1YagxYnfHoUO1fiG2ozWqOYOCu7K00fvpWBjUOWLl8e0/edit
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Timothy Hawig10/21/2015SciencePre-AP BiologyCell RespirationPart 1 Use of BTB in a solution that indicates the presence of carbon dioxide, students test one time, than after a session of exercise, test again to see the difference. Part 2 Oxygen and CO2 senstors are used to test differences in germinated peas.SB3.a Explain the cycling of energy through the processes of photosynthesis and respiration
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Timothy Hawig10/19/2015SciencePre-AP BiologyCell TransportHands-on lab involving a creative creation of the cell membrane including phospholipids, protein pumps and channels. Students than use the model they create to move water through osmosis in and out, determining tonicity. A large amount of vocabulary is used in the lab.SB1.d. Explain the impact of water on life processes (i.e., osmosis, diffusion).
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Timothy Hawig10/15/2015ScienceCP-Biology
Cell Organelles (for ESL or RTI level 2-4)
SB1.a. Explain the role of cell organelles for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, including
the cell membrane, in maintaining homeostasis and cell reproduction
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2/11/2016Kathy Sheriff2/1/2016Heatlh CareersIntro to HCSHealth Career ProjectThorough exploration of health career beginning with HS graduationHS IHS 4: Develop a career plan. 4.2 Discuss levels of education, credentialing requirements, and employment trends in healthcare. 4.3 Analyze personal career goals and develop a career plan.Chromebooks to research chosen career on approved websites: bls.gov and onetonline.org. Development of presentation with Prezi, Google Slides, Power Point, or Display Board, Student choice as long as all elements from the rubric are included.
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9/17/2016Robby Blakemore Computer Science
Computer Science Principles
App DevelopmentMake apps to help special needs students at our school. Money recognition and Cash Register concepts were implemented into an engaging app.Develop apps using programming App inventor, Android tablets
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9/17/2016Robby Blakemore Computer Science
Computer Science Principles
Game DevelopmentMake games based on the theme days for homecoming. Each day will be different and we made games to match each day. The games were played in the stem lab during lunch.Develop games using programming Greenfoot and java
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10/17/2016Robby Blakemore Computer Science
Computer Science Principles
App DevelopmentMake apps to help younger students at the Elementary school. Apps included shape recognition, animal recognition, color recognition, and sight word recognition.Develop apps using programming App inventor, Android tablets
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10/22/2016Robby Blakemore Computer Science
Computer Science Principles
App DevelopmentMake apps to help the football coach make in game decisions based on play ratios.Develop apps using programming App inventor, Android tablets
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10/24/2016Robby Blakemore Computer Science
Computer Science Principles
App DevelopmentMake an app to help the baseball coaches track hitting efficiency at winter practices.Develop apps using programming App inventor, Android tablets
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11/6/2016Robby Blakemore Computer Science
Computer Science Principles
App DevelopmentMake an app to help track orders in the concession stand at high school football games.Develop apps using programming App inventor, Android tablets
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12/5/2016Robby Blakemore Computer Science
Computer Science Principles and APCS
MentoringParticipate in the hour of code at the elementary school. We took 46 students and mentored over 700 students.Professional development App inventor, Android tablets
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2/17/2017Robby Blakemore Computer Science
Computer Science Principles
App DevelopmentMake an app to help community members find places to donate different goods to.Develop apps using programming App inventor, Android tablets
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3/21/2017Robby Blakemore Computer Science
Computer Science Principles
Professional development
Participate at the CES Community STEM panel. 2 students participated in the discussion panel. Develop apps using programming Na
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4/18/2017Michael CleekU.S. HistoryCP U.S. HistoryKey InventionsStudents reseaerched the development, application and impact of key inventions in American History. The inventions included but were not limited to the Cotton Gin, Interchangeable parts, Steam Boat, Gatlin Gun and McCormicks Reaper. Students used the original patents to exam how the machines worked and what parts were used to assemble them.U. S. History Standards for the year.Teacher developed worksheet, Patents from patent office and the internet for research
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5/5/2017MIchael Harvey5/2/2017PsychologyIntro to PsychologyAbnormal PsychologyStudents use diagnostic criteria found in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders to create review articles on specific disorders. These articles are shared and discussed in class.SSPVB3: The student will identify abnormal behavior and treatment.
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March 2017 Chetti
Nichole Chetti and Marsha Hook
5/5American LitPre-APAmerican LitPersuasionStudents must write a script using persuasive and rhetorical devices to sell an original product. Using technology, such as film apps and programs, students will film, edit, produce and perform their own commercials.
ELACC11-12W1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. a. Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases. c. Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims. d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and convention
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5-10-17Jeanne Swindle5-10-17BiologyAP BiologyBiotechnologyStudents will carry out a gel electrophoresis. They will analyze the movement of simulated DNA through an agarose gel identifying three unknowns by comparing the movement of the known samples. SB2-Use of DNA technology in forensics, medicine, and agriculture.Carolina Introductory Gel Electrophoresis activity.
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5-10-175-10-17Forensic ScienceForensic ScienceTechnology for Review Students will use the Quizizz program to review for the final exam. SFS1-Students will recognize and classify various types of evidence in relation to the definition and scope of Forensic Science.Desktop computers and Quizizz software.
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