Resources Supplement for AAPIP Racial Equity Statement
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

View only
 
 
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXY
1
2
This supplement includes links to articles, reports, websites, and other information resources related to the four principles in AAPIP's Statement on Racial Equity in Philanthropy. If you have additional resources you'd like to share, please email us at membership@aapip.org.
3
4
1. AAPIs are a significant and diverse part of America’s multicultural fabric. AAPIs are the fastest growing demographic group in the country. By 2040, one in 10 Americans will be AAPI representing more than 48 different ethnic groups and languages. Whether undercounted in the general population, misunderstood because of model minority stereotypes or deprioritized by funders and policymakers as a community without pressing needs, AAPIs cannot be ignored or rendered invisible.



5
ResourceComments
6
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-america/issues-remain-asian-american-pacific-islander-population-grows-report-n578991"...by the year 2040, the number of Asian-American voters will double, one out of every 10 Americans will be Asian American or Pacific Islander, and roughly half of the community will be immigrants from abroad."
7
https://www.advancingjustice-aajc.org/expertise?field_related_programs_target_id=All&field_publication_type_target_id=37&keys=community+of+contrastsA Community of Contrasts: Research reports from Asian Americans Advancing Justice about AAPI communities by geographic region
8
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-america/115th-congress-history-making-asian-americans-pacific-islanders-n703261
9
https://www.dallasnews.com/news/community-column/2018/11/19/asian-americans-sides-aisle-make-history-mid-term-elections
10
http://aapidata.com/
11
http://www.racecounts.org/california/
12
http://modelmajoritypodcast.com/karthick-ramakrishnan-aapi-data-model-majority-review/
13
14
15
2. We fight for racial justice and equity. Structural racism impacts communities of color in different ways. AAPIs are simultaneously perceived as a monolithic model minority and as the perpetual foreigner. This marginalizes AAPIs by ignoring the complex experiences, needs, and contexts of over 48 different ethnic groups that encompass AAPI identity. It is also used to justify public policies and cultural narratives that hurt Black, Latinx, and Native communities. Indeed, the model minority myth is rooted in anti-Black racism. Anti-Black racism and anti-Native settler-colonialism, alongside orientalism, are the foundations of white supremacy. As AAPIs, we have a responsibility to acknowledge how we are both harmed by white supremacy and also how we are complicit in it. The model minority myth continues to be used to advance racist policies related to, for example, welfare reform, criminal justice system, and most recently the dismantling of affirmative action. At the same time, we are often treated as the “perpetual foreigner” helping to justify, for example, the Chinese Exclusion Act, incarceration of Japanese Americans during WW2, the racially-motivated murder of Vincent Chin and most recently, the Muslim Ban and targeted deportations of Southeast Asian refugees and undocumented AAPIs. And when philanthropy doesn’t recognize the fight for racial equity and justice is also our fight, they share responsibility for impacts that obscure our realities and perpetuate structural racism against AAPIs and all communities of color.







16
ResourceComments
17
Ellen Wu, Indiana University, The Color of Success: Asian Americans and the Origins of the Model Minority (Princeton, 2014)
18
Shelley Sang-Hee Lee, A New History of Asian America (Routledge Press, 2013)
19
https://aatimeline.com/A Different Asian American Timeline (ChangeLab). "The boundaries of Asian American identity, like the boundaries of Asia itself, are always in flux, constructed by dynamics of power that demand to be studied: imperialism, racial domination, gender oppression, labor exploitation, war, and social movements."
20
https://www.racefiles.com/2013/05/09/what-is-white-supremacy-anyway/What is White Supremacy Anyway? (Soya Jung, ChangeLab). This article describes the relationships between anti-Blackness, settler-colonialism, and orientalism
21
https://www.urban.org/urban-wire/model-minority-myth-hides-economic-realities-many-asian-americans
22
https://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2017/04/19/524571669/model-minority-myth-again-used-as-a-racial-wedge-between-asians-and-blacks
23
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stereotypes_of_East_Asians_in_the_United_States#Perpetual_foreigner
24
http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/09/08/key-facts-about-asian-americans/When disaggregated by ethnicity, data shows that many AAPI subgroups have poverty rates higher than the national average. For example, Hmong, Bhutanese, and Burmese American poverty rates range between 28-35%--approximately twice as high as the national poverty rate of 15%
25
http://aapidata.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/AAPIData-CAP-report.pdfAAPIs are among the most likely to be limited English proficient. 35% percent of Asian Americans are limited English proficient and 1 in 5 of households are language-isolated. Language is a key driver to indicators of social and economic well-being, including, for example, access and quality of healthcare and government services, and the ability to participate in civic life.
26
https://aapip.org/sites/default/files/publication/files/lgbtq_aapi_funding_infographic_-_aapip.pdfAAPI LGBTQ people experience higher rates of psychological distress at rates higher than any other group and higher rates of unemployment than the national average.
27
https://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/voices/how-model-minority-myth-made-incarceration-harder-one-chinese-immigrantThe population of AAPIs, primarily young people, who are incarcerated nearly doubled in the past 10 years because of the immigrant-school-prison-deportation pipeline.
28
29
30
3. We stand in solidarity with fellow communities of color. Our communities have been and will continue to be critical allies with all in the fight for racial equity and justice. AAPI communities have a long history of resisting racism alongside fellow communities of color, for example, Yellow Peril Supports Black Power, Farm Workers Movement, alliances to create Ethnic Studies in colleges, and more recently #ModelMinorityMutiny and #APIS4BlackLives. It is within this context of shared struggle that AAPIP, as a founding member of CHANGE Philanthropy, will continue to work intersectionally with identity-based partners including the Association of Black Foundation Executives (ABFE), Emerging Practitioners in Philanthropy (EPIP), Hispanics in Philanthropy (HIP), Funders for LGBTQ Issues, Native Americans in Philanthropy (NAP), Women’s Funding Network and committed allies to challenge philanthropy to advance equity, benefit all communities, and ignite positive social change.




31
ResourceComments
32
http://reappropriate.co/2018/06/ours-is-a-history-of-resistance/
33
https://issuu.com/smithsonianapa/docs/earth
34
https://hyphenmagazine.com/blog/2014/11/4/brief-history-political-collaborations-between-latinos-and-asians-americaHistory of political collaborations between Latinx and AAPI communities
35
https://www.racefiles.com/2012/05/29/asians-are-the-wedge/
36
https://www.salon.com/2015/03/08/which_side_are_you_on_asians4blacklives_confronts_anti_black_prejudice_in_asian_communities/
37
http://reappropriate.co/2018/05/how-to-organize-asian-americans-notes-from-two-generations/
38
https://lettersforblacklives.com/"Crowdsourced, multilingual, and culturally-aware resources aimed at creating a space for open and honest conversations about racial justice, police violence, and anti-Blackness in our families and communities."
39
https://www.colorlines.com/articles/southeast-asian-activists-urge-solidarity-black-people-post-garner-non-indictment
40
41
42
4. We are strong partners in philanthropy’s pursuit of racial equity. Our research on philanthropic giving shows less than 0.5 percent of foundation grantmaking goes to AAPI communities, the fastest growing demographic group in the U.S. with a corresponding growth in community issues and needs. In a racial equity impact analysis, intent doesn’t matter. Impact does. Regardless of intent, the impact of philanthropic inaction is that AAPI needs are not met, and AAPI voices are not heard. Achieving racial equity requires the leadership and participation of all communities, including AAPIs. We will continue to persist as a committed, unequivocal voice for AAPIs and all communities of color until racial equity and inclusion in philanthropy becomes the norm rather than a token trend.
43
ResourceComments
44
https://aapip.org/sites/default/files/publication/files/2017.01_case_statement_aapip_national_giving_circle_network.pdfBeyond simply growing philanthropy, this [giving circles] model operationalizes social justice values by funding and building the capacity of some of the most under-represented and disproportionately impacted communities in the nation.
45
https://aapip.org/publications/moving-from-crisis-to-community-building-key-lessons-from-a-funder-collaborativeFollowing the events and climate created by the events of September 11, 2001, a group of Bay Area grantmakers began meeting to learn about communities that were most impacted, and to identify ways to support AMEMSA communities experiencing unprecedented backlash and discrimination. The result was the Civic Engagement Fund (CEF), a collaborative fund housed and staffed at Asian Americans/ Pacific Islanders in Philanthropy (AAPIP) from 2006 – 2013 that invested in building the capacity and strengthening the network of AMEMSA community organizations in the Bay Area.
46
https://aapip.org/publications/widening-the-lens-on-boys-and-men-of-colorCurrent philanthropic initiatives on boys and men of color use research that often fails to disaggregate the "Asian" category, and disadvantaged AAPI and AMEMSA boys and men are often excluded from these funding initiatives. In response to AAPI and AMEMSA organizations' concerns about the lack of attention to boys and men in their communities, AAPIP undertook a community-based research effort as an initial step towards building knowledge within philanthropy about AAPI and AMEMSA boys and men of color.
47
https://aapip.org/publications/sf-bay-area-muslim-study-establishing-identity-and-communityThis benchmark study, the first of its kind on the Bay Area’s Muslim community, provides groundbreaking data on its demographics, sense of identity, economic wellbeing, political and civic engagement, and the challenges that it faces. The resulting data is useful for academics and practitioners wishing to pursue further research, as well as for the community and its leaders, philanthropists and foundations, and policymakers.
48
https://aapip.org/publications/missed-opportunities-how-organized-philanthropy-can-help-meet-the-needs-of-lgbtq-aapiMissed Opportunities: How Organized Philanthropy Can Help Meet the Needs of LGBTQ AAPI Communities, a report from the Queer Justice Fund, finds deep disparities in funding to LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer) AAPI (Asian American/Pacific Islanders), despite rapid growth of both communities.
49
https://aapip.org/publications/growing-opportunitiesThe giving trends of the top U.S. foundations to Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities have not kept pace with the growth of these communities or of foundation assets. The report’s seminal finding, that only 0.4% of all foundation dollars were invested in the AAPI community for the period studied, has provided a baseline figure by which to assess the relative performance of foundations in every region in which AAPIP has a chapter.
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
Loading...
Main menu