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Caterogry : GeneralCaterogry : GeneralCaterogry : GeneralCaterogry : Te TiritiCaterogry : Te TiritiCaterogry : Just TransitionCaterogry : Just TransitionCaterogry : AdvocacyCaterogry : AdvocacyCaterogry : AdvocacyCaterogry : GrowthCaterogry : GrowthCaterogry : EnvironmentCaterogry : TransportCaterogry : TransportCaterogry : TransportCaterogry : TransportCaterogry : AgriculltureCaterogry : Other
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QuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestion
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Can you please provide your name?What ward are you running for?Do you think urgent action needs to be taken locally and nationally to reduce carbon emissions emissions over the next 12 years? Please provide detail with your response. What actions will you support Council taking, to implement the Climate Change Emergency Declaration?What does Council need to do over the next 5 years to improve how the region adapts to climate change?What actions will you take to ensure that Council upholds its obligations under Te Tiriti o Waitangi?What actions will you take to ensure that Council forms an effective partnership with Iwi, Hapu and Māori Please describe what you believe a Just Transition is for Greater Wellington?What steps will you take to support engagement with pacifica, youth, and marginalized groups over the Council's response to climate change?How will you work with other councils on climate change, both in the region and across Aotearoa?What policy changes will you ask the Government to make, in order to address climate mitigation and adaptation challenges?What opportunities will you encourage non-governmental organisations and businesses to take, to reduce their own organisational emissions and support those they work with to do so as well?When making decisions on Greater Wellington’s future growth, to what extent will you consider climate change adaptation and mitigation when making decisions? What will you do to promote better integrated land use and transport planning in the Wellington region?How will integrate the response to climate change with protecting and enhancing Greater Wellington's environment?Can you briefly describe what your transport policies are? How has climate change been factored into them? How will you work with WCC now, and in the future, to ensure an effective public transport system is delivered to people in Wellington. What actions will you take to support and promote active and public transport?What are your views on the current Lets Get Wellington Moving programme? What projects do you support and not support? What changes will you advocate for?What role do you see Council taking to reduce emissions from the agriculture sector?Are there any other policies or initiatives that you will support that reduce carbon emissions or help the region adapt to climate change?
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Tony JansenGWRC WellingtonYes. See below.WCC and GWRC have declared. We need to get vehicles of the streets. I am in support of a congestion tax. I would suupport removing roadside parking on major thoroughfares. I think we should also disincentivise SUV's and other large private vehicles from the city centre. I would also like to see diesel vehicles banned over a period of time to allow users to transition to other modes of transport. We also need to incentivise our bus operators to transition to a fully EV or hydrogen fleet now not in 10, 20 or 30 years time.As above as well as not support any runway extension nor deepening of the harbour shipping channel proposed by CentrePort. We also need to stop developments like Shelley Bay ehich go against accepted climate change data and reason.GWRC already works with tanga te whenua with the sfaeguarding and management of the waterways and our natural environment.GWRC already have these as far as i am aware.A regenerative economy is I believe just common sense. Unfortunately in a capitalsi socirty built on the profit motive, common sense gets conveniently marginalised. My big idea for this transition is to propose a business case study to build a full recycle plant/facility in the Wellington region so we can actually recycle all our waste and use it instead of burying it or trying to force it on some third world country to burn.If elected I will represent all people of the Wellington region.Getting GWRC and WCC to work closely together has not been successful this trienium. I plan to focus on this very closely. It makes no sense to be working at cross purposes.Well they haven't even declared a climate emergency yet despite Ollie being on Parliament grounds for 100 days.....so I guess the ball in in central Government's court.It is not really my role as a councillor (if elected) to tell people how to run their lives. But GQRC can effect behaviour through a range of measure, primarily the greater use of public transport (fully sustainable in the near future I woul hope), as well as the respect and use of our natural environment. GWRC could also push for the use of low sulphur fuel oil for all vessels within Wellington waters to reduce marine pollution.It obviously has to be front and centre. It is the big issue of our times.Thats the nature of the job I am applying for. Why? Because the incumbants have done such a poor job of this so far. We have been badly let done by our political and business leaders. It is time for a change.GWRC is already doing a lot of this due to the nature of it's mandate. Perhaps this really is a question for the City Council?Fix the buses. Fix rail. More ferries. More sustainable transport. A focus on pedestrians over vehicles. A priority on PT over roads. Anti runway extension.
In other words what most of us said we wanted but were completely ignored by our elecyed leaders and officials. I want Wellington to be a world leading sustainable boutique city.
We have to be singing from the same hymn book. Both councils are blaming each other at the moment. It woill depend on who is elected and what sort of ideological maku up both councils have after the elections.As above. One of the first things we must do is address the terrible renumeration and working conditions of the PT staff - particulary the bus drivers.LGWM options are essentially a rehash of old ideas. It sees the future as an extion of today i.e. more roads. I think it is inherently flaws and was captured by LTA from the start. I think it has been more about Lets Keep Wellington Talking thn about actually doing anything. I also think the Basin lyover is still on the agenda as an option and fully expect this to eventually resurface. Most peole want a good mass public transport option which LGWM failed to seriously address or deliver.I am not sure either Council has a legel mandate to do that. Speak to Fonterra.We could discuss capping emission levels at our airports. This could be a pretty tricky and contentious step though. But it would be a good way of putting more pressure on the airport owner to cease agitating for a runway extension.
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John KlaphakeWellington - Greater Wellington Regional CouncilYes. The science is very clear and incontrovertible. We have a very limited time frame in which to make changes to avoid the worst predictions of the IPCC. A major problem we have is that the effects of climate change seem in the distance future and that most people see it as just about seal level rise. In order to help people understand the immediacy of this we need to tell the story of all the effects of climate change, ranging from migration, heat (extreme weather), flooding, disease, collapse of the agriculture system, wildfires, infrastructure failure, power cuts, population shifts and war.The Greater Wellington Regional Council has recently declared a Climate Change Emergency Declaration. However a declaration by itself is just words on paper and sweet intentions. If elected, I will work with like-minded councillors to ensure the Declaration becomes a fundamental yardstick by which we assess all decisions we make. Further, we need to work to proactively implement the full intent of the declaration.There are a number of things it must do:
1. It must ensure it educates all people in the region about climate change and all it's effects and it's danger to us now and for future generations.
2. It must work and actively collaborate with all councils within the region to have in place consistent polices and actions.
3. It must make decisions about land that will be/likely to be inundated in the future and develop a planned retreat.
4. Ensure there is a planned programme for infrastructure revitalisation required for sustaining communities.
Ensure we have an active liaison programme that ensures iwi and hapu in the area are communicated with and there is an active channel for partnership, involvement, consultation and collaboration.Ensure we have an active liaison programme that ensures iwi and hapu in the area are communicated with and there is an active channel for involvement, consultation and collaboration. We also need to ensure that the things that are important to hapu and iwi can be brought into the GWRC calendar. What I think we really need to do is to form a sharing community.We need to have a pathway for a transition to a low carbon economy. A low carbon emission economy presents tremendous opportunities for our region, but it won't be without a bit of pain along the way, as people, industries and communities transition for a fossil fuel culture to one that is much less dependent on fossil fuels.

The role of the Council is perhaps small, but is extremely significant in that it must lead by example. This means that it must be somewhat courageous and be an early adopter of these technologies (however, some of these technologies are pretty much mainstream now - solar and wind energy and two simple examples). We should also be looking at the buildings we use - that they are energy efficient and use and employ low carbon technologies.

The example we create is precisely that - an example, what we do is low impact on the reduction of carbon emissions. But what the Council is doing is leading the way and making people, businesses and organisations think outside of their current paradigms.
The biggest thing we can do is to understand that a small group of people huddled around a table don't know all the answers. We must practice inclusiveness, to take on board and acknowledge the contributions of others. And, this includes pacifica, youth and marginalised groups. I would like to see more groups/committees like Te Upoko Taiao - it;s a bit more formalised, but shows a real commitment to taking the opinions of others seriously.There are many areas of common concern across other councils. These include both climate change and public transport (in particular the Public Transport Operating Model - PTOM) which again links in to climate change and green house gas emissions. While there are many "enlightened" councils, who are now taking steps, there are others that either do not see climate change with such urgency, or are too concerned about the financial impact on voters. Whatever, we need to be working with those councils that share the view that climate change is an imminent danger to develop a common approach where possible, and then to work in unison with the other councils in showing the way (a template) for implementing policies and actions to address climate change.I think that working in collaboration with other like-minded councils we should first of all be asking the Government to declare a Climate Change Emergency and then to both develop and implement plans that give effect to that declaration. One big area that needs change in order to mitigate and adapt to climate change the the Resource Management Act 1991. This is way out of date, especially now when we must more tightly manage and sustain our long term and natural resources.In many respects the GWRC must be leading by example. However, the GWRC also contracts with a number of agencies to provide services and equipment. In our procurement polices we could easily adopt a policy that creates a preference towards those suppliers that are reducing and managing their organisational emissions. Having said that, I think it is important that we also provide a lead in time to those organisations and suppliers, to develop and implement a plan. Climate change must actively inform any debate and decision around future growth. We have made the Declaration, now we must implement and lead by example.I have believed that once land is turned over to roads it is a bad use of land, whether that land is public land or compulsorily acquired. There can be no argument that we do need roads, but it is a road network that takes people and products to the right places, using both public and, where necessary, private transport. What we really need is an overall plan that is based on climate change models and predictions that informs our decisions on land use and transport planning.One area that is of concern to me is managing our freshwater resources well. It is a concern to me that we have a number of resource consents to extract water from our aquifers in the Hutt Valley, and we seem pretty powerless to decline them - again a consequence of the Resource Management Act 1991. We need to have greater control over our resources and to ensure we are managing our requirements for potable water, and to ensure our environment does not suffer because we are extracting water beyond the capacity of the catchment to replenish itself.

We seem to have a very myopic view of drawing water from aquifers, thinking that it is just there to take. However that water in the aquifer comes ultimately from the streams, rivers and estuaries, and if we draw too much we run the risk of low flow rates in our streams and rivers that ultimately lead to algal bloom in the summer and our inability to enjoy them. Further, if we extract too much too much in any one time we will also run the risk of contaminating the fresh water with sea water, resulting in an inability to use that for water for a couple of years.

The Council needs the means and mechanisms to be able to act as a steward for the environment.
I would like to see a focus on public transport, and especially on a light rail network. Currently, this is viewed as a Railway Station to the Airport model. I think we need to think bigger. I would like to see light rail, by using the same gauge rail on our railway network, extended out to Johnsonville, to Melling and the Hutt and to Porirua. I am very confident this would really see light rail be a success, and will see a drop in the use of private vehicles into the Capital each day. It would also see a drop in the congestion along Ngauranga Gorge and on State Highways One and Two. This in turn would obviate the need to build new roads. To do this, however, it is important that we make light rail robust, reliable and affordable. Further, we need a total overhaul of PTOM, which creates many perverse incentives for public transport.The delivery and implementation of public transport in Wellington has really suffered because of the perceived inability of both Councils to work collaboratively together. I think this is due to the fact that the mechanism and means are not there, and perhaps, the will to do so. What both councils need to realise is that we are working for the same voters.

I would like to see a permanent Public Transport Committee established that comprises the GWRC, WCC, transport planners and members of the public to work collaboratively to ensure we make the right decisions. This will, however, only work if the work of this committee is transparent.
I would like to see implemented gold coin weekend ($2 adults and $1 child, student, disabled) on Wellington City buses and the Johnsonville line as a starting point. Our weekends are our most congested, and if we can establish a viable, reliable and regular service, it is highly likely we can reduce road congestion and carbon emissions by doing so. One big area we will need to address is ensuring we have sufficient drivers, working under good conditions.Overall, I like it, and I like the set of priorities there are for dealing with the transport problems. One issue that I currently have is that there is still a lot of vagueness. I suppose this is on purpose, in order not to alienate too many people at the start. I really do support light rail - currently not really stated, but that is what I am sure will be the solution, and the emphasis on walking, biking and buses. I really think we need to be addressing the issues in that order. It would be my hope that if we are able to implement light rail as one of the first cabs off the block, we may find that perhaps we do not need a second Mt Victoria road tunnel. As mention above I will really advocate for light rail that includes Johnsonville, the Hutt and Porirua.To be honest, I am not too sure. What I am pleased to see is that the GWRC will be phasing out cattle on it's own farms. Whatever we do, it cannot be done by bludgeoning beef and dairy farmers, but more by creating positive incentives to change to other forms of farming.I will support initiatives and policies of others. Climate change requires that we all work together connotatively and collaboratively. it is far too important for egos to get in the way. I will also either modify or shift my position for ideas that a better.
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Helene RitchiePoneke/WellingtonYes absolutely. I am so angry with the Regional Council and the City Council (through its CCTO the Cable car Company which provided infrastructure for wires) for throwing out the electric buses (trolleys), replacing them with only 10 electric and old polluting noisy diesels. It and they failed in a core transport and carbon emissons reduction responsibility
Please note that there are many questions here that are repetitive. So I ask you to refer back to this answer here.

Several eg. Focus on individual, regional council and regional action not just plans

Aim: Action in the Region (and Wellington City where I will represent!)
A 10 point climate crisis resilience plan for action developed by the regional council by May 2020, and facilitated by the Regional Council for each suburb of Wellington including the CBD to be achieved by December 2020.
Implement all that we can in the Zero Carbon (Bill) and any regulations

Aim: as a policy to minimise greenhouse emissions in the City and the rural Region
Monitor carbon emissions at key points in the City and suburbs and report monthly to Council
Monitor and Ensure every policy and practice and contract undertaken by the Regional Council answers the question: Does this reduce carbon emissions? If not why not and is there an alternative?
Increase immediate public transport use
Review existing contracts with GWRC to ensure health and safety provisions are met (so that drivers (conditions) and passengers are safe; that there are enough drivers to ensure the service needed
Provide reliable regular buses and trains, accurate real time, direct services (without unnecessary "hub" bus changes); examine the impact of free public transport during peak times (as in eg. Singapore).
Seek Government funding for the trains (which used to be fully funded by Government)
Ensure mass rapid transport decisions for Wellington City are prioritised
by calling for Expressions of interest immediately, and establishing a critical path of decisionmaking, including funding approvals, to ensure Heads of Agreement and then Head construction contract let by March 2022 at the latest.

Aim: Provide guidance, tool and education for individuals and households
Provide carbon footprint template for each resident
Encourage food waste reduction and waste reduction, repurpose, recycle
Ensure plastic use reduction

Aim: Refuse fossil fuel exploration (on the South Coast)
Oppose fossil fuel exploration and exploitation

Aim: Increase carbon sinks:
Encourage with tools, funds and resources the many and more native forest planters and weeders

Aim: Increase and enhance our natural and native plant environment and biodiversity and pest eradication
Support and increase our pest eradication schemes and enhance biodiversity

Aim: Integrated Regional and District Plans
Ensure Regional and District Plans are amended to take account of climate crisis, in integrated urban, rural and transport planning
Council needs to ACT not just write plans

As above, repeated here:

Several eg. Focus on individual, regional council and regional action not just plans

Aim: Action in the Region (and Wellington City where I will represent!)
A 10 point climate crisis resilience plan for action developed by the regional council by May 2020, and facilitated by the Regional Council for each suburb of Wellington including the CBD to be achieved by December 2020.
Implement all that we can in the Zero Carbon (Bill) and any regulations

Aim: as a policy to minimise greenhouse emissions in the City and the rural Region
Monitor carbon emissions at key points in the City and suburbs and report monthly to Council
Monitor and Ensure every policy and practice and contract undertaken by the Regional Council answers the question: Does this reduce carbon emissions? If not why not and is there an alternative?
Increase immediate public transport use
Review existing contracts with GWRC to ensure health and safety provisions are met (so that drivers (conditions) and passengers are safe; that there are enough drivers to ensure the service needed
Provide reliable regular buses and trains, accurate real time, direct services (without unnecessary "hub" bus changes); examine the impact of free public transport during peak times (as in eg. Singapore).
Seek Government funding for the trains (which used to be fully funded by Government)
Ensure mass rapid transport decisions for Wellington City are prioritised
by calling for Expressions of interest immediately, and establishing a critical path of decisionmaking, including funding approvals, to ensure Heads of Agreement and then Head construction contract let by March 2022 at the latest.

Aim: Provide guidance, tool and education for individuals and households
Provide carbon footprint template for each resident
Encourage food waste reduction and waste reduction, repurpose, recycle
Ensure plastic use reduction

Aim: Refuse fossil fuel exploration (on the South Coast)
Oppose fossil fuel exploration and exploitation

Aim: Increase carbon sinks:
Encourage with tools, funds and resources the many and more native forest planters and weeders

Aim: Increase and enhance our natural and native plant environment and biodiversity and pest eradication
Support and increase our pest eradication schemes and enhance biodiversity

Aim: Integrated Regional and District Plans
Ensure Regional and District Plans are amended to take account of climate crisis, in integrated urban, rural and transport planning
We need to ensure:
That our partnership with mana whenua and tangata whenua are extant and real
That te reo is recognised as the first language of Aortea roa
That we adhere to the three "P's"of Te Tiriti: the principles of partnership, participation, protection of rights and property, which underpin the relationship between the Government and Maori under the Treaty.
Kawanatanga, Rangatiratanga (over lands, taonga and forests), Equality.

Regular dialogue
Possibly direct representation on the Regional Council with a voting right
Review the memorandum of Understanding
Partnership on key issues.

Promote dialogue on the development of a climate resilience plan and action as outlined above.
These questions seem repetitive. The answers I have given already are in the second question which outlines action and a Just Transition which I believe possible and imperative for the Regional Council and the Region.

See above qQ 2.

As above through the Suburban Resilience plan and perhaps a sub plan for specific groups-discussed, created and acted upon.

Council needs to ACT not just write plans

As above, repeated here:

Support protest action and school strikes
Through the Regional Plan and District Plans (a statutory obligation under the RMA) and Zero Carbon Act
Regular dialogue
Lead by example
As above
Support the Zero Carbon Act and regulations
Seek Government full funding for trains and funding for mass rapid transport and public transport
Limit dairying and encourage mitigation measures
Seek alternative sources of carbon "friendly " income for Aotearoa
Offer monitoring
See above answer to first question

As above offer to develop a Resilience plan, action and monitoring and perhaps a sub plan for specific groups-discussed, created and acted upon.

Council needs to ACT not just write plans

As above, Q.2


Statutory Planning

Ensure Regional and District Plans are amended to take account of climate crisis, potential for flooding, wind, sea surges, sea rise and other related matters


................
See my answer to the second question

Act on the Suburban Resilience plan and action

Council needs to ACT not just write plans








Ensure regional and district plans address this to minimise carbon emissionsAim: Increase carbon sinks:

Encourage with tools, funds and resources the many and more native forest planters and weeders

Protect and enhance our natural environment, forests and parks

Protect and enhance our marine environment


As above Q,2

Council needs to ACT not just write plans

Focus on individual, regional council and regional action not just plans
As above, repeated here:

Aim: Increase immediate public transport use

Review existing contracts with GWRC to ensure health and safety provisions are met (so that drivers (conditions) and passengers are safe; that there are enough drivers to ensure the service needed

Provide reliable regular buses and trains, accurate real time, direct services (without unnecessary "hub" bus changes); examine the impact of free public transport during peak times (as in eg. Singapore).

Seek Government funding for the trains (which used to be fully funded by Government)

Ensure mass rapid transport decisions for Wellington City are prioritised
by calling for Expressions of interest immediately, and establishing a critical path of decisionmaking, including funding approvals, to ensure Heads of Agreement and then Head construction contract let by March 2022 at the latest.

Ensure safe walking and cycling routes throughout the urban environment.

Associated with transport: (as all should be integrated) :

Public transport is pivotal

As in Q.2 repeated here:

Dialogue

Encourage WCC to ACT not just write plans

As above, repeated here:


Offer to discuss the following with them and to seek their adaptation and adoption, with the focus on individual, regional council and regional action not just plans, and on territorial council' actions.

As in Question 2.

See above

Council needs to ACT not just write plans

Focus on individual, regional council and regional action not just plans
As above, repeated here:

Aim: Increase immediate public transport use

Review existing contracts with GWRC to ensure health and safety provisions are met (so that drivers (conditions) and passengers are safe; that there are enough drivers to ensure the service needed

Provide reliable regular buses and trains, accurate real time, direct services (without unnecessary "hub" bus changes); examine the impact of free public transport during peak times (as in eg. Singapore).

Seek Government funding for the trains (which used to be fully funded by Government)

Ensure mass rapid transport decisions for Wellington City are prioritised
by calling for Expressions of interest immediately, and establishing a critical path of decisionmaking, including funding approvals, to ensure Heads of Agreement and then Head construction contract let by March 2022 at the latest.

Ensure safe walking and cycling routes throughout the urban environment.

Associated with transport: (as all should be integrated) :

As in Q.2 as all are ingegrated or should be.
It's a mess of nothing much helpful just pretty pictures and weasel words

Priority: Mass rapid transport, public transport safe cycling and walking.

Ensure mass rapid transport decisions for Wellington City are prioritised
by calling for Expressions of interest immediately, and establishing a critical path of decisionmaking, including funding approvals, to ensure Heads of Agreement and then Head construction contract let by March 2022 at the latest.

Ensure safe walking and cycling routes throughout the urban environment.


.............................

As in Q. 2
Work with the agricultural sector in the region

A 10 point climate crisis resilience plan for action developed by the regional council by May 2020, and facilitated by the Regional Council for rural/agricultural sectors of Wellington including the CBD to be achieved by December 2020.

Water swimmable and drinkable...

Irrigation policy and practice reviewed

..........................................

Council needs to ACT not just write plans



As in Q. 2

As above I am about done.... Can you please send me back a copy of this as I wanted to save it but I did not want to lose five hours' plus work and now I am told that I cannot submit as my response is too large!! So I reduced it and it is still too large! There was no word limit given at all. I cannot guess the size and after I have spent hours completing this!
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yvonne legarthWellington Regional Council - Wellington constituencyYes, action certainly needs to be taken to reduce emissions, and also to reverse the loss of vegetation that acts as a carbon sink.The advisors to the Council need to be encouraged to investigate and report on a full range of options and opportunities to implement climate change actions in all of the policy and strategic decision making streams. As a Council, expenditure could be identified to provide incentives for developing and implementing initiatives that reduce emissions.Ensuring vegetation loss is reduced, transport alternatives are accessible and workable, and urbanisation does not increase in areas that are at risk of inundation and flooding. Consultation is key - I support policy and decision making processes that consult with, recognise and develop relationships with mana whenua. The regional council has had advisors and representation of mana whenua on committees and as decision makers, and that should continue.As above - Consultation is key - The regional council has had standing committees, and representation of mana whenua on committees and as decision makers, and that should continue.Moving to a low emission economy means working together - with iwi, communities, regions and sectors to identify and maximise opportunities. I'm open to the council taking a role in facilitating new initiatives.The City Council has had reference groups to provide views and advice to councillors and Council staff. That is an approach that could be implemented at the regional council.Sharing ideas, research and initiatives so we can learn from each other.Implement the recommendations of the Recommendations from the Climate Change Adaptation Technical Working Group.

Use the public research fund to develop alternative energy, agriculture and transport options.

Fund services that reduce discharges such as the rural fire service (getting fires put out quickly reduces the amount of smoke entering the atmosphere).

To ensure government funding is not directed to urban growth and infrastructure in areas vulnerable to storm events, flooding and inundation. Encourage haulage companies to move to electric vehicles fund feasibility studies for commuter alternatives in the smaller centres to get more cars off the road; encourage a move from air and roads to rapid train services for people and freight.

I would encourage support for apprenticeship training and incentives for people to make electric car and hydrogen conversions of existing vehicles. Converting the existing vehicle fleet reduces the damage mining for raw materials to make cars, waste inherent in disposing of redundant cars, and cost of transporting cars here. More attractive for the classic car owner too.
Making education tools available to them that they can apply to their particular circumstances. Recognising and promoting those NGO's that are already making a difference.One of the key considerations to ensure growth is located away from areas where sea level rise and flooding is going to be an issue in the future.The research done and planning tools developed by the council (like the regional policy statement) should consider the relationship between types of land use, environmental impacts, and access to services including parks, reserves, and accessibility to a full range of transport options.
I place a priority on allowing natural process and habitats to I support subsidised public transport to ensure the services are available in more places to more people.Transport options must consider the potential impacts on the environment (both positive and negative impacts) and should be located away from areas that are likely to be vulnerable to natural hazards to ensure they are more sustainable. A good public transport system isn't limited to WCC. Other local authorities also WCC deal with the bus stops, and other infrastructure. The regional council provides the public transport services, and should ensure this is efficient and accessible. Taking opportunities to align the two providers so that more people can accessRetain the Johnsonville train line, ensure there is a public transport choice throughout the region. I am a big supporter of the train services. I have listened to the commentary about the need to re-think the changes that were made to the bus routes; I support moving back to a useful bus service. I have encouraged the government to reinstate the train services so there are better public transport options from Wellington to other centres. I support a review of the Transport strategy to integrate on solutions that facilitate higher use of public transport.I think the 'Lets Get Wellington Moving' strategy needs to be reviewed. The focus should be on the full range of transport options, and directing urban growth where those transport links are available; but also on better route design that has a regional focus; not just moving people in the City to and from the suburbs but ensuring decent services from other towns into the region. Retaining the open spaces, supporting and funding the Council's community planting days; providing free plants to improve streetscape and offset emissions, and restoration projects all contribute.The agriculture sector is a broad field. I expect there are many small steps that can be taken by crop producers and animal farmers. I support policy initiatives and research into more sustainable herds, such as sheep that are less drought sensitive.
Improving the ability to transport products (and people) by train. Farmers work fairly hard at keeping the costs of production down; encouraging farmers to take the next step by offering recycling, collection and safe disposal services means farmers are less likely to burn or bury plastic and other products.

Develop a regional climate change adaptation plan.
Continuing support for restoration of the regions indigenous habitats, ensuring regional parks are kept for recreation of re. Rates reductions for people who install solar heating and insulation on their properties.
9
Troy MihakaPōneke/Wellington - GWRCYes.
By taking steps to reduce Wellington's carbon footprint, we can position ourselves as international leaders in Climate Change.
This can be achieved with the implementation of cleaner fuel sources such as hydrogen engines and electric motors. And looking for renewable sources of electricity for our city.
Support of, and cooperation with, the Climate Change Commission.
Action towards the CCE can be across a number of actions, such as increased native planting in our Regional Parks, the continued adoption of electric vehicle charging stations, and the upgrading of our bus fleet to electric or hydrogen.
Climate Change is of international importance.
Wellington has the ability to become world leaders on the issue of Climate Change. In order for this to happen, our Councils need to begin investigating which areas of activity can be moved towards more sustainable practices.
As a Māori, the obligations of Te Tiriti o Waitangi are very close to my own heart.
I would strive to build relations with local Iwi, fostering stronger relations between these groups.
GWRC are responsible for environmental management of the whole Wellington Region. In order to manage these environmental resources effectively, the local Kaitiakitanga must be involved in these discussions.
GWRC are responsible for environmental management of the whole Wellington Region. In order to manage these environmental resources effectively, the local Kaitiakitanga must be involved in these discussions.
I will work hard to foster effective communication between the GWRC and the local Iwi/Hapu, as much as able.
My understanding is that a Just Transition is the process of moving our economy from a natural resource based economy, towards an economy which creates a renewing effect for our environment and considers the well-being of all people.
In Wellington, some examples have included the rise of the IT Industry, and the continued strength of our Hospitality and Artist sectors.
As a member of two marginalised groups (LGBT+ and Māori), I beleve it is important for our council to be representative off all our residents. This representation is only possible with ongoing, effective communication between the council and these groups.I intend to foster communication between the GWRC and our neighbouring Regional Councils (Horizons, Hawke's Bay, Tasman and Marlborough), to find ways to create effective solutions for the whole of Central NZ.
This includes public transport options, freight/shipping and our combined environmental concerns.
I would ask the Government to provide funding towards the adoption of renewable energy technologies. This includes the continued adoption of electric vehicles, and the upgrading of our Public Transport fleets.Small efforts can begin with simple ideas, such as corporations and agencies working together for environmental projects including foreshore clean-up, waterway restoration and continued predator trapping.Climate Change and environmental concerns should be paramount in all decisions made by the GWRC.By working closely with city councils, the GWRC will be able to create a more effective transport policy for the whole Wellington Region.
This needs to be created by building strong working relationships between members of all local councils in the Wellington Region.
The Wellington Party seeks to build this working relationship by creating a group of candidates who are able to work closely together to strengthen communication between councils.
Wellington's approach towards native flora and fauna should be enhanced.
By utilising our native plant life in waterway restoration and foreshore/ocean front planting, we can begin to rebuild our environment in a sustainable way.
The use of native vegetation will improve our region by creating more habitats for our native animals, providing a strong approach to both Climate Change and conservation.
The introduction of an integrated transit network with a focus on clean energy sources, such as electric and hydrogen.
An integrated public transit network will allow more accessibility for the general public throughout the Wellington Region. Clean energy sources will allow the general population to be able to access our region while also keeping carbon emissions low.
The Wellington Party seeks to build this working relationship by creating a group of candidates who are able to work closely together to strengthen communication between councils.An integrated public transit network will allow more accessibility for the general public throughout the Wellington Region.
The addition of cycleways as a part of scheduled roading upgrades will allow more accessibility to those members of the community who do not operate their own personal vehicle (for example, if they are too young or otherwise unable to drive).
I support the adoption of a walking focused Golden Mile, with dedicated bus/PT route also utilising that corridor.
I support the adoption of an integrated transit system, with payment card access to all mass transit forms.
I support the addition of cycleways during the scheduled upgrades to all major roads in our region, and included in any new roads constructed.
I support the upgrading of the SH1 and SH2 routes through the Wellington Region.
Regional Council needs to work closely with the agricultural sector to provide advice and resources for the mitigation of environmental concerns.The negation of sewage overflow into Wellington harbour.
Continued investment into our Regional Parks, with a higher focus on native plantings.
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Tony De LorenzoGreater Wellington Regional CouncilYes. Regional Councils need to work WITH farmers and offer help with reducing emissions. Better and more affordable public transport as a realistic alternative to cars is also required. Setting up a emissions reductions team to help all parties the emit to reduce emissions. Build better resilience against sea erosion, ground stabilisation and flood protection. Consult and meet with iwi and representatives on a regular basis often with no agenda rather that just consulting when as required.I want to meet, sit and just listen where I can. Iwi and maori should be present at council meetings and working groups regardless of voting rights, to contribute to the discussions. Consultation with all parties underpinned with strong and a bold leadership. Part of the emissions reductions team role would be education. Virtually host a national forum of council climate change. Allow councils to ask others for help in areas they are struggling and to promote local successes nationally. All new builds to have 20% power from solar or wind. This to apply to residential and commercial. Zoning for housing to consider current land use and proximity to climate change affected areas. Subsidise the use of public transport of employees. As part of tender processes weight must be given to emission statements. It should be part of any decision making process as part of the climate emergency declaration. After getting expert advice adjust policy to reflect this. The two are linked. A world class public transport system that is at least carbon neutral. Multiple options for transport and GWRC operating and managing its own network.We need to develop a unified policy. Improvements to the infrastructure need to be actioned in a bold and speedy manner. We both know what needs to be done. We just need to start doing it. Lowering the price of transport. Annual public transport survey. There seems to be a lack of bold decision making. I support the light railway. Work with teh sector rather than just take a measure and punish approach. Work with EQC so that they can invest in resilience rather than just pay out when damage occurs.
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Sam SomersPoneke/Wellington Constituency - GWRCYes we do need to urgently need to take action
We need to take action in particular with our overall transport emissions since that the greatest emitter in Wellington, starting with phasing out the Euro 3 and Euro 4 buses and replacing them with electric buses. I would support GW funding either the conversion of the 50 trolleys into Battery Buses and I would also lobby central government into lifting the 20 statutory life of buses, for electrics to be 25 years, to ensure that the trolleys can run the full length of their contract with GW.
I would advocate for electrification of the main trunk railway between Waikanae and Palmerston North and would also support duplication of the railway line from Pukerua Bay to Paekakariki to provide an alternative rail transport corridor between Wellington and Palmerston North
The council I am standing for has already declared a climate change emergency, and I am proud that they also set goals aswell when making that declaration, a key component to showing that GW is looking at Solution Focus, not just declaring a climate change emergency to be part of the band wagonGW needs to have a plan of what land is to be allowed for nature, what land should be save and what risk mitigation measures does GW decide to take and fundTo have local iwi representatives to be at a joint committee along with the city and district councils representatives. Have Iwi, Hapu and Maori as part of the consultation through asking for submissions from effected party, taking it one step more just offering them a chance to put a submission, this should also be extended to all parties of effected properties in the area. Just transitions is preparing for events that aren't seen on the face value, as they are unknown but need to know what could be coming and prepare to solve it when it comesWith these local community groups have one of our elected councilors to attends the meetings of the organisations, we have a seen a good relationship about it with residents associations, we now need to extend that community groups. If elected I would have a tour planned of residence associations, community groups and public events in order be informed about what that community wants and needsAt a GW level continue with our existing joint committees at a regional level and the chairs of those committees to represent us at the national levelI would propose changes to things like water bottle consents, taking the power back to the people, not a rubber stamping process that we currently have under the RMA

I would also like the government to provide a ring fenced climate change fund for support measures to flood protection, and seawall building. A $ for $ approach would be my starting point when it comes to establishing this fund and all regional council and unitary authorities should have a similar fund set up and with Locals making the decisions fitting best for their community needs, not what central government think is best
Support process with more electric vehicles for those business, helping roll out more fast charging EV Charging stations in the area, and looking at options when it comes to waste, for pooling resources when some areas are not achievable on their own. The whole process, including how close we build infrastructure to waterways, how high is the lowest floor of the property from sea level, whether to enforce the 1 car per house rule or set car free build zones, with car share schemes?Having a unified committee between GW, NZTA and the local councils as we currently have.

I personally do not support an authority like Auckland Transport CCO because of the lack of transparency and accountability this organisation has taken to the people.
By setting a plan to combat it with solutions, and have goal and the tools to measure against to ensure we are meeting those targets and make adjustment to meet them. My aim is to have all Wellington Buses to be electric by 2030, when the contracts would have turned out, my aim is also to keen all Matangi's electric, and for the implementation of the EDMU to happen as planned
I would also support kiwirail to have Electric-Diesel trains to operate between Palmerston North and Wellington and the same with Masterton to help with it using our own electric system while under the wires
Set up a sub committee of the sustainable transport committee, with the 5 Poneke/Wellington Councilors and 1 Councilor from each ward from WCC and a driver representative from each bus company to ensure we have Wellingtonions making the decisions about Wellington Buses

I also support this type of committee for other areas like the Hutt Valley and Porirua if needed
I am starting with a policy to have free weekend public transport from zone 1 to zone 3 to combat, weekend traffic congestion being giving options other than the car, to provide the means for families without cars to get around cost effectively rather than staying at home, and to reduce cars idling with the reduction of cars on the roads. I like the focus on mass transit with my preference for Light Rail, and the option of the second tunnel for MT Victoria and a joint fund for what to do at the end of the basin

My biggest concern is certain interest groups or candidates will try and hijack the process and make promised to projects outside the scope to be completed with that money.

My aim is to advocate for a Light Rail system first to Wellington Airport via Newtown with a MT Albert Tunnel

With a second MT Vic tunnel i would support a 3 lane tunnel bore, with 2 lanes for traffic, with the area for the 3rd lane reserved for walking, cycling, mobility scooters, e scooters and a minimum width space enough to fit 2 electric wheels chairs passing each other without the need to stop or needing to reverse out and to have it separated from the fumes with a divider between the traffic fumes and the pedestrians.

I would love to see a cut and cover tunnel style to help sort out the basin but until we have more detailed plan on what is happening with the basin reserve, my opinions here will have to remain neutral for this part of the project other than supporting it needs doing
I would like to see farmers and council work together to work on practices to collectively reduce their emissions. I would also like to see a reduction to gorse in our rural areas as this pest plant has been known for contributing to additional nitrate runoffs our waterways. I have a policy to help 4400 households and 100 farms every year for 10 years into renewable energy solutions to help both the users energy bill and reduce the effects on non-renewable electricity generations.

This is a $50 million scheme repaid through a targeted rate over 15 years
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Bryce PenderPoneke/WellingtonYes, this is best achieved by replacing trees in CBD with new ones as they all have reached max growth and no longer act as Carbon Sinks, new ones will absorb carbon as they grow, we need to reduce reliance on private cars, work with Public Transport, Utility/Service Providers to roll out electric service vehicles or Alternative Fuels, reducing waste, recycling more (esp the waste from street rubbish bins) Unknown at this stageGrass root changes driven by staff and GWRC to be seen to lead the charge, e.g. use PT more rather than drive to and from work, invest in leading the changes, after all councils need to be seen walking the walk and talking the talk. Even down to simple tasks as turning out the lights in offices at night.Communication is the first key, each case potentially requires a different approach on a case by case basis and trying to have one policy/plan to deal with differing issues/matters is fraught with dangers, I plan to deal with each issue on a case by case basis.Communication is the first key, each case potentially requires a different approach on a case by case basis and trying to have one policy/plan to deal with differing issues/matters is fraught with dangers, I plan to deal with each issue on a case by case basis.I pass as I do not know your definition of A Just Transition, it could be interpreted many ways.Communication is the first key, each case potentially requires a different approach on a case by case basis and trying to have one policy/plan to deal with differing issues/matters s fraught with dangers, I plan to deal with each issue on a case by case basis.Communication is the first key, each case potentially requires a different approach on a case by case basis and trying to have one policy/plan to deal with differing issues/matters is fraught with dangers, I plan to deal with each issue on a case by case basis.Communication is the first key, each case potentially requires a different approach on a case by case basis and trying to have one policy/plan to deal with differing issues/matters is fraught with dangers, I plan to deal with each issue on a case by case basis.Communication is the first key, each case potentially requires a different approach on a case by case basis and trying to have one policy/plan to deal with differing issues/matters is fraught with dangers, I plan to deal with each issue on a case by case basis.Unknown at this stagePlease refer to my long term transport vision link on my Facebook page Bryce Pender No.1 for GWRC - Fixing the busesUnknown at this satge.Please refer to my long term transport vision link on my Facebook page Bryce Pender No.1 for GWRC - Fixing the busesPlease refer to my long term transport vision link on my Facebook page Bryce Pender No.1 for GWRC - Fixing the busesPlease refer to my long term transport vision link on my Facebook page Bryce Pender No.1 for GWRC - Fixing the busesPlease refer to my long term transport vision link on my Facebook page Bryce Pender No.1 for GWRC - Fixing the busesPragmatic and sensible steps to reach the desired outcome, enabling participants to take the lead. Change too much too fast and participants withdraw, a Carrot and Stick approach is better than other options.My broader NZ based Rail centric vision was based around the idea of closing landfills and moving by rail all waste to regional based processing centres to remove all recyclables for processing and export then properly burning the remainder in Hi Temp Plasma Furnaces to burn off all toxins before using the heat to generate steam for power production, heat for horticulture and aquaculture greenhouses/sheds for year round seasonal food production with the left over ash used for road base, filler for concrete, fertiliser or to be put back into old coal mines.

Copy of vision is available if you wish to see it.
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Daran PonterGreater Wellington Regional Council (Wellington City)Yes, at a global, national, regional and local level. This is the reason I supported the Greater Wellington Regional Council's Climate Emergency Declaration, and advocate for a comprehensive approach to address climate change across the Wellington region.Standing behind a Wellington Region Climate Emergency Action Plan which:

1. Establishes appropriate governance arrangements for climate change
2. Supports decision making and policy development by including robust analysis of climate change impacts
3. Reviews the GWRC climate change strategy and establish a senior management champion for climate change priorities within the organisation to ensure an internal culture shift is achieved
4. Advocate to Central Government to ensure legislation enables GWRC to expedite climate change and related water quality and quantity actions and consent based on an emissions threshold
5. Support territorial authorities to create and implement proactive place-based, inclusive and community-led, engagement programmes relevant to the different dynamics of each area, which draw on existing community networks and reflect the interdependent nature of environmental issues and people
6. Undertake additional technical research:
a. to be able to provide detailed, fit-for-purpose advice to support community
engagement programmes and advise infrastructure renewal programmes
b. to inform fine scale mapping of areas at highest risk of flooding in conjunction
with Wellington Water’s storm water investigations
7. Actively work with central government to identify funding opportunities for community engagement programmes and financing adaptation responses

Also:
8. Working collaboratively with key institutions and agencies across the region to develop a Regional Climate Mitigation Plan
9. Actively building a regional afforestation brokering role to build partnerships which capitalises on the Billion Trees programme and expand permanent native forests on public and private land
10. Imbedding emissions reductions targets in key programmes and projects to ensure the region contributes to the target of Net Zero New Zealand 2050, and long term infrastructure investments properly account for the anticipated increased cost of carbon resulting from the introduction of the Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill
11. Advocating for the Government to sign MARPOL ( International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973) which for nearly fifty years the New Zealand Government has refused to sign.
12. Advocating government for the ability for Regional Councils to put in place congestion charging.
+ Follow through on the Climate Change Action plan.
+ Extend the Climate Changes Action Plan to a wider scope of activities.
+ Build climate change response into the Natural Resources Management Plan and advocate to government for climate response to be "injected" into the RMA
+ Engage with other Councils, Iwi, business and communities on climate change actions.
+ Advocate to government for more powers to put in place climate change responses and adaptations.
+ Lead by example by driving hard to meet the GWRC's corporate emissions target of carbon neutral by 2030 (more electric buses, afforestation of regional parks etc)
+ 50:50 mana whenua representation on key Council committees
+ Regular engagement with Iwi on issues that GWRC is responsible for
+ Requiring all Council reports to include a Treaty of Waitangi consideration.
+ Regular engagement at an Iwi level
+ Mana whenua representation on key Council committees
+ Consultation and active engagement with Iwi, hapu and whanau on key initiatives undertaken by the Regional Council
A ‘Just Transition’ recognises that responding to climate change will be a mix of positive opportunities and necessary changes. It acknowledges that we will only be successful if we find a way forward which is fair to everyone.

For GWRC this means recognising that different communities and groups have different capacity and capability to respond to climate change, and that some will require closer attention and greater support than others.
A cultural shift in the way that the GWRC engages with communities is required. I will be looking for the Council to take a more inclusive and deliberate approach to engagement across communities on the broad spectrum of issues with which the Council is involved.At a regional level, through the Mayoral Forum and the Regional Strategy Committee, as well as working groups to be established specifically to guide responses to climate change.I will ask the Government to:

+ "inject" a stronger climate change directive into the Resource Management Act 1991
+ provide regional councils with stronger powers for the preparation and enforcement of regional spatial plans
+ provide councils with the ability to impose congestion charging
+ provide councils with stronger power to manage coastal retreat with local communities
+ sign the MARPOL convention
As part of the Regional Climate Change Action Plan non-governmental organisations and businesses will be encouraged to undertake a climate change audit (like a WOF) to identify areas in which they can reduce their carbon footprint. Organisations will be incentivised to act.Under the Climate Change Emergency Declaration climate change will be considered in all key decision of the Regional CouncilDevelopment of a Wellington Region Spatial Plan aimed at containing urban sprawl and focusing where we invest in public infrastructure. The Spatial Plan and the Regional Public Transport Plan will both promote a stronger approach to Transit Oriented Development across the Region.By joining up the approach to climate change and the protection of the environment - e.g. encouraging forest planting on erosion prone land (class 6-8 country).1. Stablising and improving the Wellington bus network by addressing the driver shortage, making services reliable, and putting a new Real Time Information system in place

2. Building confidence in the network by introducing bus priority (esp. Karori Rd, Thorndon Quays, Newtown and Golden Mile)

3. Increasing public transport patronage through mode shift, by:

a) lowering public transport fares (in part through challenging the Government's Fare box recovery rates);
b) introducing more travel concessions (esp. to community card holders and off-peak users);
c) introducing full integrated ticketing;

4. Advancing Mass Rapid Transit as the focus of LGWM; and

5. Purchasing new rail rolling stock to meet increasing demand.
Closer working relationship at a Councillor and officer level to jointly problem solve and put in place appropriate measures.1. Stablise and improve the Wellington bus network by addressingt he driver shortage, making services reliable, and putting a new Real Time Information system in place

2. Build confidence in the network by introducing bus priority (esp. Karori Rd, Thorndon Quays, Newtown and Golden Mile)

3. Increase public transport patronage through mode shift, by:

a) lowering public transport fares (in part through challenging the Government's Fare box recovery rates);
b) introducing more travel concessions (esp. to community card holders and off-peak users);
c) introducing full integrated ticketing;

4. Advance Mass Rapid Transit as the focus of LGWM;

5. Purchase new rail rolling stock to meet increasing demand; and

6. Support the Wellington City Council in the provision of walking and cycling access.
I support the focus on bus priority, active modes and putting place a Mass Rapid Transit System.Working with the agricultural sector on land use change and retirement of land from greehouse gas emitting activities, including through policies and rules in the Natural Resource Plan (requires amendments to RMA by govt).Government must sign-up to MARPOL.
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Victoria Rhodes-CarlinGreater Wellington Regional Council - Pōneke Absolutely. We are in a climate and ecological crisis and the Regional Council has the greatest opportunity to implement the urgent changes, regulations, and initiatives to reduce emissions in 12 years to stay within a 1.5’C global temperature rise.
I spoke to the Regional Council in both June and August in support of declaring an emergency. They finally did in August, but they have much work to do to strengthen its climate strategy.
With over 60% of the region’s emissions coming from transport and 30% from agriculture, the GWRC needs to transition to an all electric fleet of buses (which are currently diesel). Only through a fair, accessible, and reliable public transport can we reduce transport emissions and get people out of private cars. Through the transition of council owned grazing lands to native forests and wetlands, and supporting the transition of private agricultural land to wetlands and forests both CO2 and methane emissions can be reduced.
Te Tiriti o Waitangi and a climate justice framework must be at the centre of all climate decisions. I have been going out of my way to meet with mana whenua across the region, from Manawatu to central Wellington to hear what they think is needed. Stronger partnerships and decision-making involvement is needed. Importantly, mana whenua must be given greater resources and financial support to have better capacity to be involved in council decisions and consultation.
Currently the GWRC has a strong mana whenua board that regularly meets and consults on a range of topics. I believe there needs to be greater involvement of iwi and hapu by making these decision-making processes for all, not just iwi and mana whenua leaders. Greater financial support, capacity building, needs to be given to Māori to ensure they are able to fully participate in decision-making processes. The GWRC needs to incorporate Tikanga in consultation, decisions, and operational work, valuing the mana and katiaki roles of mana whenua.
With a large portion of emissions and environmental degradation coming from the agricultural sector, particularly in the Wairarapa, a just transition must focus on supporting farmers, especially dairy farmers to transition to less carbon intensive practices. A transition of land use must meaningfully involve all of those affected, ensuring that all actors are valued and have just outcomes.
My background is in youth development and inclusive decision-making. For the past three years I have led Aotearoa Youth Declaration, a conference of hundreds of diverse rangatahi coming together to identify issues in our society and propose solutions to them. From this experience, community-driven decision-making is one of my most important policies. To make local government more accessible and inclusive, many changes must come through public and school civic education, establishing and developing relationships with community groups and networks, and ensuring that consultation processes and hui are accessible (evening meetings, supporting transport costs etc). Pasifika, rangatahi, and other marginalised groups such as refugees and community service card holders must be involved in council decision-making processes and I will champion programmes to do so. I want to establish a rangatahi taiao programme, to empower and educate rangatahi on environmental issues in Wellington, giving them leadership skills, and allowing them to co-design environmental management for the region.
The GWRC has a lot of work to do to restore the fragmented relationships with the other councils after the bus mess. Collaborative, compassionate, and inclusive teamwork across the Wellington region can help achieve a carbon neutral plan. Through LGNZ and the young elected members network, climate action, learning, and experiences can be shared and built upon through existing collaborative networks.

I believe the Government needs to increase methane targets, focusing on transitioning from harmful modes of production (agriculture). I will also push for a review of PTOM, to allow local governments to choose public transport providers that are sustainable, not just choosing the cheapest provider who tends to be carbon intensive. I believe there are many changes needed, however, I personally will not have much influence over Government policy, it will have to come from an united LGNZ.The Regional Council should develop an emissions reduction and neutral framework for businesses and NGOs. This framework can offer Wellington focused options and initiatives to support these organisations and their clients. It is important for the GWRC to show leadership and offer support to groups around the region to follow in GWRC in achieving ambitious climate action.
I will consider it in every decision; from flood management, biodiversity management and predator control, to public transport planning. There are opportunities for climate mitigation and adaptation in every decision.
With a predicted population growth of 46,000 people in Wellington City over the next 30 years, both the GWRC and WCC need to strategically design a sustainable, dense, compact, connected, and accessible transport network and land use plan. Any transport and land use planning must be decided in the context of climate justice and resilient infrastructure. I will promote increasing density of housing, limiting urban sprawl and new roads, and will ensure that the infrastructure and public transport meets the needs of these new developments. Integrating better green spaces and reserves into the CBD and surrounding suburbs is a priority for me to ensure that people have access to nature, play areas for families, and have spaces to connected with their community.
Protecting our biodiversity, freshwater resources, and marine and coastal ecology will need additional additional and stronger strategies in the context of climate change and the unpredictable nature of it’s impact on our environments. Strengthening predator and disease control in our reserves and green belts are important steps to protecting our at risk biodiversity. With only 2.3% of our original wetlands left, regenerating wetlands across the region are significant enhancements to local environments but also have a regional impact on biodiversity and carbon offsetting.
On top of my Ambitious Climate Action policy, my public transport policy fits into a climate justice framework. I want to deliver a fair and accessible public transport service, that connects across the region, is sustainable and carbon neutral, is a reliable option for everyone and is preferred over cars. We need fairer fares for students, part time students and discounts for community service card holders. We also need a direct bus route from the train station to the airport for under $10, and better direct services and less hubs. A fair and accessible public transport network that is sustainable and carbon neutral is the best option for addressing climate change.
GWRC and WCC need to work better to ensure both infrastructure and public transport needs are designed alongside each other. There is great opportunity to deliver safe cycle ways and pedestrian only areas through through improved co-design. Establishing a strong working relationship with WCC from inception is important to a strong working partnership over the three years.
I have been door knocking around Wellington for the past three months, and there are consistent concerns around the safety of cycling and lack of space for pedestrians in the CBD. Working with WCC, we need infrastructure designed for active transport, not cars. Through campaigns and educational programmes in schools, I want to achieve a shift from private vehicles to active transit.
The LGWM package is a great start to creating a fair and accessible public transport network. I support the implementation of light rail as a mass transit option from the railway station through Newtown and Miramar and to the Airport. However, light rail could take six to ten years to build, we need a strong bus transit and active transit network in place that can manage the increasing population. In the meantime, developing a rapid bus transit network is essential that can be supported through having a car-free golden mile. I support an extra Mt Victoria tunnel, but for public transport and active transport only, not private vehicles.
With over 30% of the regions’ emissions coming from agriculture, the GWRC needs to take thoughtful and ambitious actions in reducing agricultural emissions. First, the GWRC can transition it’s grazing leases from agricultural use to restoring native forests and wetlands in our regional parks. The Council as a role to play in a just transition for the farming community across the region from carbon intensive practices to sustainable and low carbon methods. The Regional Council has the opportunity to set strong methane reduction targets, land management and resource use restrictions, and have a greater monitoring role in ensuring land users are meeting set targets.

Sea level rise will be a challenge for many towns across the region. Developing resilient infrastructure, community resilience, and managing retreat will need to be well planned out over the next few years. We have time to develop detailed and comprehensive adaptation plans but they need to be community-driven and meaningfully involve people from all communities.

I will not support an airport extension and will work hard to stop it.

More roads leads to more congestion, pollution and negative health impacts. I will promote active and public transport as desirable and preferred options and not support new roads and highways where public transport can be the main option.
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Alexander GarsidePonekeAbsolutely. We may be small, but as a car-loving anglosphere country, we have an opportunity to demonstrate leadership and a practical decarbonisation pathway for others.Displacing as many private car journeys as possible with an increasingly capable public transport network, accelerating native planting and guiding long-term regional growth towards dense urban forms.Primarily we need to continue taking the resilience and capacity of our freshwater supply seriously. I intend to build meaningful partnership into all council goals, and never ignore the alignment of land-development with colonization.I would have the council proactively involve Iwi in our projects and planning, especially relating to land use.I believe a Just Transition requires us to proactively create structures and opportunities for our most vulnerable, not just remove options. Much of our built environment and economy are reliant on fossil fuels, that reliance cannot excuse inaction but needs all levels of govt to support solutions.The council has set a goal of operating at net-zero emissions by 2030, in part due to youth action. I will listen to young voices, and support any movement to lower the voting age. Climate change threatens the long-term viability of many pacific islands, in addition to flattening our climate impact I will work with our Polynesian community to help make Wellington home for those displaced.Primarily I will create a year 2100 spatial framework to help guide local council plans for land use and growth. Our low-density housing patterns are an enduring obstacle to cutting transport emissions, by setting density along scaleable transit lines as a priority we can build a cleaner region for everyone.I'll ask the government to change our PTOM, the goal of fully commercial buses stands in complete opposition to their mass adoption.I can't profess to be proficient in agricultural issues, but I would like the council to take a proactive role in helping farmers reduce their environmental impact, especially providing support for transitions away from dairy.Entirely. Parts of Wellington will sink, parts of Wellington currently require vehicles to fully participate in society and our rainfall patterns are likely to change. To ignore or minimize the effects of climate change when planning would be criminal.Create an 80-year regional spatial plan with the intention of guiding all growth into resilient, dense and accessible patterns. Local councils could then decide what to implement in their 30-year district plans, and it would provide certainty for infrastructure investment.Promoting, supporting and connecting mixed-use high-density development. Per-capita emissions can fall, the model supports economic growth while leaving wild land free for regeneration and enjoyment.I seek to build a regime of regular service improvements, based on public input. We need to cut emissions fast, by making network review and improvement routine we can displace car journeys systematically.WCC takes its lead from GWRC, I will actively engage them in provisioning space for an ever-improving bus network. WCC has demonstrated a willingness to undertake clean-transport projects, it's an opportunity GWRC hasn't fully taken advantage of.I will seek to better integrate bikes on trains, as for public transport it needs no promotion. Demand currently overwhelms supply, the main task of GWRC is to choose to meet that demand. Without grade-separation of SH1, more tunnels would be a folly. I'd prioritize the establishment of a dedicated mass-transit route, what we ultimately run on it is less important than the route itself.Beyond prioritizing native growth in council parks, I feel the council could achieve multiple objectives by supporting transitions from dairy to alternative agriculture.I support any initiative to provide long-distance passenger rail as an alternative to air travel.
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Thomas NashPoneke Wellington, Greater Wellington Regional CouncilYes - climate action has to be at the heart of all our decisions. This will require serious structural change to our economy. We need to move away urgently from industries and economic activities that produce greenhouse gases. We need to transition our agriculture, transport and energy sectors into low-carbon, low-emissions activities. At the same time we need to plant trees, allow native forest to regenerate and restore wetlands so that we can build up carbon sinks around the country. Greater Wellington should accelerate the shift to electric buses and press ahead with electric light rail to reduce reliance on individual fossil fuel cars. Transport is the number one climate action lever we can pull in this region and we should be vigorously promoting active transport and mass transit rather than more roads. GWRC should also stop the grazing and farming of its land, particularly wetland areas and allow these to regenerate into native forest and wetlands. A blue belt for marine restoration will also allow kelp forests to regenerate, providing further carbon sinks around our coast. Accelerate tree planting and regenerating forests, wetlands and marine habitats.
Increased flood defences and a managed retreat from vulnerable coastal areas.
Protection of water supply to deal with potential for more extreme droughts.
Support transition away from intensive high emission agriculture and land use.
I’m committed to working as a genuine treaty partner with mana whenua. I’d like to explore ways for the council to ensure a mana whenua voice in all council meetings. I’d also push for mātauranga Māori to be incorporated in the development of policy responses on environmental matters. Existing relationships with iwi and hapu should be strengthened and maintained. The council should work with mana whenua to look at ways to ensure a Māori voice in all council meetings. Consenting processes should systematically involve mana whenua. Council decisions should be scrutinised from a Tiriti o Waitangi perspective.A just transition in Wellington involves building partnerships with people working in climate-polluting industries to develop pathways out of those industries and into other work that is climate-safe. This will involve coordination with central government as well as Wellington City Council and other councils around the region. The idea of a Green New Deal for New Zealand would unlock a wide range of new, productive and meaningful jobs.We should be including Pasifika, youth and marginalised groups in our discussions and decisions. That means going to meet them in the places where they live rather than expecting them to come and submit to us. I’d like to see a climate assembly convened in the Wellington Region, involving councils, local MPs and residents from around the region. My background is coalition-building, communications, negotiations and diplomacy so I know how to bring people together and find common ground. I’ll focus on that in my work on council.I’d advocate strongly with central government to:
- Increase funding for public transport, including electric buses and light rail
- Increase funding for flood defences and a managed retreat for coastal communities
- Promote a Green New Deal, including an industrial strategy oriented towards low-emissions activity
I’d like to promote a community-wealth building approach with Greater Wellington, using the council’s procurement power and budget to support local businesses and community organisations with low emissions kaupapa.Climate action should be at the heart of all council decisions, in particular in relation to growth within the region. This means planning for residential growth in areas that have strong natural resilience to climate change. One thing is getting the policy right, so we need to follow the evidence on transport planning in the region. I’m in favour of transport and urban development policy that makes it easier for people to live low-emissions lifestyles, in positive healthy communities. Most importantly though, we need proper coordination between the regional council and other councils within the region and coalition-building amongst different councils. That takes time, good communication and strong relationships.Taking bold climate action and enhancing our environment go hand in hand. Regenerating our native forests and restoring our wetlands will promote biodiversity as well as sequestering carbon. Likewise promoting marine conservation and restoring coastal marine habitats will store carbon and help bring back the abundance of marine life we need.I’m in favour of improving and rapidly electrifying Wellington’s bus fleet and pressing ahead with light rail. Transport is the single biggest climate action we can take in Wellington. I’ll strongly support active transport through pedestrianised streets, shared spaces and segregated cycleways. We should be reorienting transport policy away from individual petrol cars and towards active and public transport. I’m an experienced communicator, organiser and coalition-builder and I’ll work hard to forge strong relationships with Wellington City Council to help press forward with public transport. We need to make the most of the joint WCC, GWRC, NZTA “Let’s Get Wellington Moving” programme, which offers us the opportunity to make the infrastructure changes we need. We should get on with the business cases and start the tender process for mass transit.While we prepare the ground for a mass transit system in Wellington we should be starting work immediately on segregated paths for cycles and scooters. This could be done through three-month trials using “armadillo” barriers, for example. LGWM is a strong starting point for the transport shifts we need in Wellington. Most importantly the LGWM plan prioritises active and public transport over cars. We need to reinforce this shift in orientation and get on with the immediate projects around improvements for pedestrians, cycles and scooters. We should advance plans for light rail and avoid the unravelling of this mass transit proposal in the face of opposition from the roading and car lobbies. I would prioritise active transport and light rail plans ahead of new roads and tunnels.For a start the Regional Council should not be leasing its land to be farmed - this land should be allowed to regenerate into native forests or wetlands. Beyond this, Greater Wellington should be encouraging more diverse, less intensive land use. I’d like to see support for mixed farming and some cropping, including for plant-based proteins. I’d like to see the Wellington Regional Economic Development Agency reformed to focus on a deliberate strategy of supporting agricultural (and other economic) activities that reduce emissions and restore ecological harmony. I will strongly push for blue carbon storage through a ‘blue belt’ of conservation projects and marine protected areas around our regional coastal marine area. Kelp forests and other marine habitats sequester huge amounts of carbon. We should help restore them.

We also need to secure our water supply in the face of climate change - this means taking a precautionary approach to taking water from our aquifers. Wellington’s Waiwhetu aquifer extends under the harbour, with freshwater springs from the aquifer feeding biodiversity hotspots on the sea bed. If we take too much water from the aquifer - for commercial water bottling for example - we risk reducing the pressure in the aquifer and contaminating it if these freshwater springs stop flowing and start draining seawater into the aquifer.
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Roger BlakeleyWellington Constituency of GWRCYes . The UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report on 8 October 2018 said that the global community has until 2030 to reduce our carbon emissions by 50%, or it will be too late to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees C above pre-industrial times ( the Paris COP target in 2015). NZ's carbon emissions are still going up. We need urgent action to 'bend the curve downwards' and reduce carbon emissions by 50% by 2030.As Chair of the GWRC Climate Change Working Group, I co-led the drive for GWRC on 21 August 2019 to Declare a Climate Emergency and to set a corporate emissions target of net zero by 2030. This includes a 10-point plan to deliver this target. This includes: 100% electric bus fleet by 2030, 100% electric corporate vehicle fleet by 2030, accelerate reforestation planting in regional parks, retirement of grazing leases and increased planting of native species, secure renewable electricity supplies for GWRC via procurement, partnerships and/or direct investment, work with Boards of subsidiaries including Centreport and Wellington Water to align to Council's 'net zero carbon emissions by 2030' targetI am Co-Chair of a Regional Group on Coastal adaptation. We have published a Vulnerability Assessment Report of the vulnerability of the whole regional coastline to sea level rise and storm surges, and taking account of the capability of the communities to adapt, including socio-economic status, infrastructure, sites of cultural significance to Maori. Local councils will work with their communities on community-led preparation of long-term, dynamic, adaptive pathways over 100 years, including dune nourishment, sea walls, and managed retreat. Council will also be working closely with councils in the Wairarapa on sustainable water supply to cope with increased frequency of droughts.I will ensure GWRC works in partnership with Mana Whenua. This will involve a co-governance approach to meeting the target of net zero carbon emissions by 2030, and adaptation to climate change.The regional working group on coastal adaptation that I chair has an iwi representative. GWRC works in partnership with Ara Tahi to ensure regional Mana Whenua interests are incorporated in regional policies and plans. Council will also ensure that local councils engage in partnership with iwi, hapu and Maori in setting adaptation plans.A Just Transition for Greater Wellington will involve a fair sharing of the burden of mitigation and adaptation to climate change, recognising that the burden should not fall unfairly on low socio-economic groups. Mitigation and adaptation policies must include a requirement for a Just Transition.I will ensure that council engages with Pasifika, youth and marginalised groups in formulating mitigation and adaptation policies and plans, including working with Generation Zero.I will ensure that GWRC works in partnership with all 8 local councils in the greater Wellington region, in formulating a regional mitigation plan, and adaptation policies. We already have in place a regional working group on climate change, which is representative of all councils in the region, at both governance and officer level. I will ask Government to work with local government to amend the Local Government Bill, to reflect that local government is at the sharp end of both mitigation and adaptation to climate change. Ensure that local government is involved in setting national and regional climate change risk assessment and response policies. Request central government appoint an independent experts' group to advise on a policy and funding framework for adaptation to climate change, including the costs of managed retreat of coastal communities.Provide examples of leadership by non-government organisations: for example, I chair a committee of Rotary Club of Wellington, which has completed an assessment of its carbon footprint, which has been audited by Enviro-Mark Solutions, and the club will be applying for certification as a carbon-zero organisation. We have written up a case study and will be encouraging all Rotary clubs in NZ and Rotary International, to follow our lead. We will be working with businesses, using a carbon emissions reduction calculator, to enable joint planning involving businesses, iwi, councils, NGOs, communities, to achieve net zero carbon emissions by an agreed date.I will insist that GWRC applies a 'carbon lens' to every decision it makes, which is relevant to climate change, mitigation, and adaptation, and makes decisions consistent with its targets. I will ask GWRC to work with local councils on a regional spatial plan for Wellington, which will have as a core objective, 'quality compact urban design'.The regional spatial plan will ensure integration of land use, transport, and infrastructure. I have expertise in this area, since I led the preparation of the Auckland (regional spatial) Plan, when I was Chief Planning Officer, Auckland, from 2010 to 2015.I will ensure that all policies relating to protecting and enhancing GWRC's environment are aligned to our climate change objectives, including clean water, bio-diversity and bio-security, regeneration of native forests and wetlands.I am advocating for transport policies for the region which will achieve major mode-share shift from private vehicles powered by fossil fuels to increased walking, cycling, public transport, including electric light rail, micro-mobility, car-sharing, and electric vehicles - leading to zero carbon emissions from transport by 2040 (transport currently accounts for 39% of Wellington region's carbon emissions). My plan is much bolder than the mode-share shift and carbon reduction targets in 'Let's Get Wellington Moving'.Work together with WCC and NZTA so that 'Let's Get Wellington Moving' progresses at a much faster rate than it has to date. Work with WCC on bus priority measures, to accelerate bus lanes and traffic light priority.I have signed the petition calling for a world-class cycling network in Wellington within 10 years, under 'Let's Get Wellington Moving'. I will rigorously promote the transport hierarchy of priority: walking, cycling, public transport before private cars.It has been abysmally slow, and lacking in ambition to effectively reduce carbon emissions. I support walking, cycling, bus priority, light rail from the railway station to the airport via Kilbirnie. I also support trenching of Karo Drive, because of the benefits to urban design of Te Aro. I do not support a second Mount Victoria tunnel, nor a second Terrace tunnel.Working with local councils and rural communities through the whaitua (catchment) committees to reduce dairy intensification and pollution from run-off into streams and rivers, and methane emissions. Encourage reduced numbers of cows and sheep, and shift into agriculture that is more efficient in use of resources, including vegetarian substitutes for meat. I have listed above numerous policies that I will support, that will contribute to both mitigation and adaptation to climate change, both by central government, through the zero carbon bill and the climate change commission, and adaptation policies led by the regional council and local councils working with businesses and communities.
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David LeeGreater Wellington Region Council (Wellington)Absolutely, we need to act as if our life depend on it - cos it does! Albeit, we (NZ) only contribute 0.2% of the global emissions, our position is leadership - we need to show by example. Noting that per capita we are bad!!!We need to plan a clear climate adaption pathway which will involve: protection, accommodation and managed retreat. We can apply the lessons learned from Hawkes Bay, and our local example - Makara Beach Project (which I was the sponsor, as the WCC Climate Change portfolio leader). And, be mindful that climate related impact can take the form of slips, river flooding and not just SLR and storm surge.I will make every effort possible to ensure Māori (and tauiwi) have an opportunity to participate and contribute to Council decision-making processes.Ensure mana whenua have a seat at the table and are respected as true treaty partners. In particular, in the area of managing natural resources , embedding the concept of kaitiakitanga into policies and practice eg. land and water management (freshwater, coastal and marine areas).The biggest challenge of this generation and future gens is climate change. All good having well-meaning declarations and policies, but action and a pragmatic pathway is need for the region. That involves sharing best practice and coordinating initiatives/programmes to transition the Wellington Region/New Zealand to a low emissions economy.

Focus on promoting the uptake of EVs (private car, commercials, and PT), renewable energy, energy efficiency and conservation, carbon sequestration (carbon sinks/trees), and reducing organic waste to landfill.
Establish Regional Climate Change Youth Forum/Council targeted at Māori, Pacifica, minority and marginalised groups eg. multicultural, accessibility groups.Continue to promote and foster the work of the Regional Climate Change Working Group, which I am the current Deputy Chair. Scope to include the insurance and property sectors, research institutes, and academia. Get the Carbon Zero Bill into legislation - asap! Setup the Climate Change Commission - asap. Remove the $25 price cap carbon. Simplify the carbon sequestration process with MPI. More financial incentive/disincentives to promote the uptake of EV eg. feebate scheme. Share best practice eg. travel plans, energy and waste audits. Use carbon calculators (eg. FutureFit personal calculator) to assess their emissions and development an emissions reduction action plan.It's critical that both climate adaption planning and emissions reduction measures are consider when making decisions on the planned growth of the region. Issues relating to: transport, location or centres, transit corridors, services, infrastructure, scale and intensity of development, energy, resilience and waste management. Being an urban planner I'm a fan of spatial planning; at its heart is not only the integration of transport and land use planning but also funding. I would push GWRC to lead spatial planning for the region GWRC have already developed a 10 point action plan in response to climate change. I would link the action plan to specific environmental KPIs.Transport is the regions biggest contributor to our GHG profile. Therefore, electrification of our vehicle fleet (private cars, light commercials, bused and other PT) is the number one priority. Rollout of more EV charging infrastructure. More infrastructure for active-modes. Promote carshare schemes. And, mass transit - likely to be trackless tram over light rail. All, will have the benefit of reducting transport emissions.We should be operating as ONE ie. WCC/GWRC/NZTA. We need to take the 'Let's Get Wellington Moving' project/programme to the next level ie. one entity for the funding, planning, delivery and operation of PT across the region. Similar to Auckland Transport; it's not perfect but it works! One throat to choke!As an urban planner - the utopian society is one that has the appropriate infrastructure that supports and promotes walking and cycling (and now micro-mobility) and PT. To do this, I will ensure that active-modes and PT are made a priority in the next Annual Plan and that appropriate funding is there to support it. [my answer to Q2 is also applicable] Too much of LGWM it is focused on very expensive transport 'solutions' to fix what we believe are transport problems eg. congestion. In fact, most transport issues are land use related eg. school zoning (see link), no high school in Karori NZ's largest suburb, the Basin Reserve is neither a roundabout or a sportsfield. We could have an elevated walking and cycling ring-route over the basin and have free-flowing traffic below ie. removal of the 3x sets of lights at the Basin Reserve.

For/Against
Support second Mt Vic: as it will improve connections between eastern suburbs and the city. On the proviso, there is a significant improvement in active-modes and PT.

Support the Petone to City cycleway/micro-mobility-way. no brainer!

Support Mass Transit - railway station, airport and hospital: more likely trackless trams. Spend the moolah on the fleet/trams rather than blow all your money on putting infrastructure in the ground over 150 yr old utilities. Sydney's light rail project and AK are good examples of cost overruns and disruption to businesses.

Absolutely opposed to the airport runway extension: corporate welfare, and will never happen - not in a million years!
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School zones
https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1o5y3_nH_SwydUZGIG05qR0IxRLk&ll=-41.25680725973706%2C174.75325584999996&z=11
Farming is not necessarily bad/evil - farming is food production: But Council could encourage a shift from agriculture to horticulture. It could be a win, win, win! Horticulture can achieve much higher ROI for famers, and it values natural resources (ie. water quality/quantities and quality of soils) and will have reduced emissions.We are lead to believe emissions reduction and climate adaption are sides of the climate change coin.

The third side of the coin is: Carbon sequestration (planting trees). There is a 'goldmine' (carbon credits) in: retiring marginal land for either forestry or native planting, riparian planting to improve water quality and health the rivers/streams. Planting to improve land management and erosion control. Registration of GWRC and private land into any one of the NZ carbon trading schemes can also be financial beneficial. Given, the price of carbon has reach its cap of $25 per unit, and should skyrocket once the cap is removed and all emitters/polluters are brought into the regime.
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Adrianne Staples
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