Depolarization database
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

View only
 
 
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
1
Title
Date published
OutletAuthorSummaryLink
2
Psychological Vaccine Against Fake News — Cambridge Social Decision-Making
Lab
Aug 21 2018
sdmlab.psychol.cam.ac.uk
Cambridge Social Decision Making Labwe found that the presence of "sticky" misinformation (about climate change) neutralized the influence of simple facts almost entirely. Yet, by forewarning and exposing subjects to a weakened version of the falsehood and by preemptively debunking this falsehood with even stickier "facts" (the vaccine), the effect of scientific evidence on public attitudes about climate change was partially preserved, varying as a function of how detailed the inoculation was. Importantly, we also found that the "vaccine" even had some retroactive benefits among those ideologically predisposed to be skeptical about the issue of climate change.
https://www.sdmlab.psychol.cam.ac.uk/news/fakenewsvaccine
3
How seeing a political logo can impair your understanding of facts | PBS
NewsHour
Sep 3 2018PBSUniversity of PensylvaniaThe presence of political logos on social media undermines people's ability to learn, share and have a ratinal discussion on an issue
https://www.pbs.org/newshour/science/how-seeing-a-political-logo-can-impair-your-understanding-of-facts
4
#REF!Oct 23 2018Open DemocracyPerry Walker - TalkshopExperiences in the run up to and aftermath of the UK Referedum on remaining in the EU with facilitated conversations between votrs on both sides of the debate
https://www.opendemocracy.net/transformation/perry-walker/helping-people-to-find-common-ground-on-brexit
5
Moral Outrage in the Digital Age2017
Nature Human Behaviour
Molly CrockettHow does Moral Outrage function differently in the Digital Age
https://static1.squarespace.com/static/538ca3ade4b090f9ef331978/t/5a53c0d49140b7212c35b20e/1515438295247/Crockett_2017_NHB_Outrage.pdf
6
The Hidden Tribes of AmericaOct 20 2018More in CommonMore in CommonResearch into the political tribes and differences of groups in the US.
https://hiddentribes.us/
7
Does Violent Protest Backfire? Testing a Theory of Public Reactions to Activist ViolenceOct 11 2018SociusSimson, Willer and FeinbergViolence in political protest leads the general public to view a protest group as less reasonable, reducing identification (support) with the group. Furthermore, the authors argue that violence also leads to more support for groups that are perceived as opposing the violent group. Tested people's views before and after exposure to newspaper articles discussing violence. - authors apply to increasing dislike of white supremicists post Charlottesville
http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2378023118803189
8
Elite polarization, party extremity, and affective polarizationDec 2018Electoral StudiesBanda and CluveriusIncreasing elite polarization triggers increasing affective polarization among the rest of the popluation - based on studies for 1970s to 2016 in America
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0261379418301975
9
Forecasting tournaments, epistemic humility and attitude depolarizationOct 30 2018CognitionTetlock, Mellers and ArkesForecasting tournaments encourage deliberation - which reduces polarisation. If people stop, think and consider issues, they are likely to take a more nuanced position
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0010027718302798
10
How People Update Beliefs about Climate Change: Good News and Bad NewsFeb 2016
Harvard Law School
Cass R. Sunstein,* Sebastian Bobadilla-Suarez, ** Stephanie C. Lazzaro,** Tali Sharot**
Using climate change as an example, people are more likely to believe news stories that confirm their existing beliefs than ones that challenge them. (aysmetrical updating). Does that mean that placing new information in the public domain increaes polarization?
http://www.law.harvard.edu/programs/olin_center/papers/pdf/Sunstein_883.pdf
11
Exposure to opposing views on social media can increase polarizationSept 2018PNASBale, Argyle, Brown, Bumpus and othersExperiment on twitter exposing people over a month to a bot of opposing views and tracking the impact. Conservatives becames significantly more hostile to liberals (US based work) but liberals did not undergo the same degree of polarization
http://www.pnas.org/content/pnas/115/37/9216.full.pdf
12
AFFECTIVE POLARISATION, INTERNET AND SOCIAL MEDIA USE IN THE UK2018
Oxford Internet Institute
Marchal and WatsonExplores affective polarization in the UK and finds that there is no obvious explanation to it in the UK and calls for urgent further research
http://blogs.oii.ox.ac.uk/policy/wp-content/uploads/sites/77/2018/09/IPP2018-Marchal.pdf
13
Epistemic Spillovers: Learning Others’ Political Views Reduces the Ability
to Assess and Use Their Expertise in Nonpolitical Domains by Joseph Marks,
Eloise Copland, Eleanor Loh, Cass R. Sunstein, Tali Sharot :: SSRN
Apr 2018SSRNMarks, Copeland et alWe have a bias to people who are politically likeminded to us even when discussing non politicical issues
https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3162009
14
British FutureSept 2018British FutureRutter and CarterICM survey showing over 60% of the UK inhabits an extreme pro or anti immigration view
http://www.britishfuture.org/publication/national-conversation-immigration-final-report/
15
Loss of Confidence ReportDec 2018
Society for Improvement of Psychological Science
Roher et alStudy asking academics to review the confidence in their work - and examinign the barriers to them doing so
https://psyarxiv.com/exmb2
16
The revenge of the places that don't matter | VOX, CEPR Policy PortalJan 2019CEPR Policy PortalAndres Rodriguez-PoseThe costs of agglomoartion (boom towns) for those left behind, and why asking them to move is often ineffective.
https://voxeu.org/article/revenge-places-dont-matter
17
Trust in Scientists on Climate Change and Vaccines - Lawrence C. Hamilton,
Joel Hartter, Kei Saito, 2015
Aug 2015Hamilton, Hartter and SaitoTested in Oregon and New Hampshire, the authors asked Democrats and Republicans how much they trusted scienstist as a source of information on environement issues and vaccinations. It showed that across issues, Republicans trusted scientists less
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/2158244015602752
18
Explaining Parochialism: A Causal Account for Political Polarization in Changing Economic EnvironmentsJul 2018Stewart, McCarty and BrysonA simulation exploring the trade off and rewards for in and out group interactions in different economic climates. Suggesting that when good economies start to fall, high polarization becomes almost inevitable.
https://arxiv.org/abs/1807.11477
19
Neural correlates of maintaining one’s political beliefs in the face of
counterevidence | Scientific Reports
Dec 2016NatureKaplan, Gimbel and HarrisMRI study on people with strongly held liberal beliefs testing if they find it harder to maintain those views when challenged. Experiments is between non political opinions and political opinions. Showing that people do update beliefs in the light of new information, but do so to a far greater extent when they are not political. They did not consistently fid that this challenge trigged the amygdala
https://www.nature.com/articles/srep39589
20
Does Apologizing Work? An Empirical Test of the Conventional WisdomSept 2015Richard HananiaTesting the comments of Rand Paul on the Civil Rights Act (he had indicated in 2010 businesses should be allowed to discriminate on the basis of race) Hanania found that making an apology made people no more likely to vote for Paul. He also tested the comments of Larry Summners who suggested women had less 'intrinsic aptitude' for science and engineering roles. Here exposure to an apology made people think more negatively of Summers than those who had no exposure to an apology.
https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2654465
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
Loading...