Implications for Planning & Top Teaching Tips
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Teaching Tips for Different Ages
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We have used resources from Girls Rock! DC, Willie Mae Rock Camp, and Rock 'N' Roll Camp for Girls, and we sincerely thank them for sharing this information with Girls Rock! Chicago! Being a part of the GRCA community is essential; without this resource, our camps would not be possible!
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Aspect8 - 10 year olds11 - 13 year olds14 - 16 year olds
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Grade LevelsElementary School, Grades 3-5 Middle School, Grades 6 - 8High School: Grades 9 & 10
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♪ Keep them moving. They can’t sit
for long, so keep segments and
activities around 10-15 minutes and
then change it up (different
activity/location, movement break,
stretch). Several short play breaks are
better than one long break. Kitchen
timers can help both you (to plan) and
the campers. Remind them, “We have
5 more minutes until…”
♪ Keep them moving. They can
handle longer segments/activities (20-
30 minutes), but need a wide variety.
Provide breaks and free time, but set
boundaries. Create opportunities for
them to release energy.
♪ Never, ever bluff. Always follow through
on tasks and promises. Stick to your
published agenda – if you change it make
changes public so teens’ expectations are
clear.
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♪ Plan hands-on activities. Learning activities should not be lecture-based. Have them moving, touching things. talking, writing/drawing, DOING.♪ Use manipulatives. Give them
things to touch. For example, give
cards they can hold up instead of
raising hands. When possible have
examples of concepts they can see
and work with (models, dolls, blocks,
cut-out flowchart symbols, money).
♪ Give more responsibility -- Create leadership opprtunities (ie keeping track of time, doing teachbacks to group, setting up room, etc…), but keep an eye out. For instance, give them the responsibility of walking to the bathroom alone, but make sure they know where it is (because they won’t ask) and have a sense of how long they have been gone (because they will push the boundaries and say they didn’t know).
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♪ Plan partner and small-group
activities. Allow them to talk to peers
and work together to allow them social
time as well as make shy ones feel
more comfortable.
♪ Let them talk. Create activities that
have a lot of discussion or
partner/group talk. Also important to
plan free time for them to talk to each
other that is unstructured.
♪ Make them role models. Let them know
that the young girls look up to them and
want to be like them. That means that the
teens can have a really positive impact on
the younger impressionable girls (possibly
more than us). Use this as motivation to
encourage teens to participate in full group
Hall of Sisterhood activities.
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♪ Provide structure. Have a schedule or agenda and tell them the objectives and activities they will participate in beforehand. Calling the activity a “game” gives them incentive to listen and participate. When giving directions for something, clearly tell and show Step 1, Step 2, Step 3...♪ Give choices. Provide choices in
activities, rewards, and how to explore
new content—everything! If possible,
try to give choice about working with
partner, small group, or independently.
♪ Give them choices so that they are able
to make decisions for themselves or with the group. For instance, ask feedback
about what to add to agenda, what
activities to do next, etc…
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♪ Provide rationales. Explain why a
skill or concept is important. Show how
real musicians use what they are doing
and learning.
♪ Plan activities. Activities keep their
attention and help them apply the
information you are teaching! Try to make
activities age-appropriate (ex: use pop
culture references and social justice topics
instead of talking about unicorns and
friendship bracelets). Make activities
interactive,
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♪ Incorporate whole-group games and
challenges into activities. “Let’s see if
we can…”
♪ Use humor. Teacher attitude, tone,
and sense of humor are critical for this
age. Prevent them from taking
themselves too seriously.
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Other Tips for 8 - 10 Year OldsOther Tips for 11 - 13 Year OldsOther Tips for 14 - 16 Year Olds
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♪ Have a ball to squeeze handy (or other objects) for fidgeters.
♪ Encourage problem-solving and
debate.
♪ Do not give busy-work or tasks for which meaning is unclear.
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♪ Stay positive! Find someone doing what they are supposed to and say, “I like the way Shelbo is ___.” The others should follow.♪ Incorporate opportunities for them to
set short term goals, track progress,
and compete against their personal
bests.
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♪ When a student is off-task or not following directions, ask them what they should be doing, instead of saying “NO!”♪ Give them work that feels “grown up”
(research, interviews, tasks
professionals would do).
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♪ Try to use other signals for quiet (raised hand, clap pattern, chant), instead of raising your voice.♪ Help them “save face.” When possible, handle discipline or criticism in private. Be constructive and positive and encourage self-evaluation when you offer feedback.
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♪ Nominate campers with outstanding behavior for “I Rock” buttons.
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