2016 Minnesota Archives Symposium Call for Panelists
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Session TopicSession IdeaYour NameInstitutionYour Contact infoNotes
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EngagementDescribe what you would like to talk about in your part of a panel presentation: How do you bring in new audiences? Do you digitize materials, create events, work for partnerships? How do you promote diversity and engage a diverse audience? What strategies have worked for you? What have you learned through developing these projects?John DoeUniversity of Somethingjohndoe@gmail.com
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EngagementAs an organizer of the Twin Cities Zine Fest and a long-time zine librarian, I'd welcome the opportunity to talk about zines and other self-published works in archives. Zines represent an unfiltered glimpse into lives of those frequently unrepresented in traditionally published materials. In libraries and archives, collecting zines can be an appealing way to build connections with local communities and provide unique insights to researchers.Violet FoxCollege of St Benedict/St John's Universityvfox025@csbsju.edu
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EngagementWe recently acquired a collection of photographs of African-Americans in Minneapolis and St. Paul taken by an African-American photographer in the late 1940s.  None were identified.  Working with the donor family, we've held two events in the neighborhood where the photographer lived, inviting residents and other interested individuals to help us identify the people in the photographs.  In addition to holding these and other "crowdsourcing" efforts to ID the photos, they have also served to better connect the Library with the local African-American community as a source and responsitory for elements of their history in the area.Ted HathawayHennepin County Libraryehathaway@hclib.org
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EngagementUmbra: Search African American History (umbrasearch.org) is an online search tool that brings together over 400,000 digitzed archival materials documenting African American history and culture from across the country. As Project Manager, I work with partners and communities locally and nationally to engage users. From building institutional partnerships for content to digitizing nearly .5 million materials at UMN alone to and hosting public events across the country, Umbra is working with a network of partners to expand the historical record. Umbra has engaged communities and users through pop-ups in undergrad libraries, lightning talks, and workshops nationally; a hackathon at Hennepin County Library; and the launch of #UmbraSearch to engage users in a national conversation using the materials in Umbra.Sarah CarlsonUniversity of Minnesotacarl4256@umn.edu
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EngagementI am starting a project with the University of Minnesota’s KUOM recordings in September and by the time of the symposium I would like to talk about our engagement strategies for the new digitized materials and the evaluation of these strategies. Project promotion will occur throughout the process and we will be sharing content with the Digital Public Library of America and the American Archive of Public Broadcasting. As a majority of digitization projects are visual materials, I would also like to touch on the differences of working with engagement and promotion of audio materials.Karen Obermeyer-KolbUniversity of Minnesotakobermey@umn.edu / karen.ann.ok@gmail.com
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EngagementI have been working for several months with the family of a Minnesota artist (Jon Arfstrom) who passed away last year in order to preserve his legacy. He and his wife retired to Anoka a little more than 10 years ago and he did a lot of art featuring this area, but also has a much broader range of art (and therefore potential audiences) than just the Anoka related pieces. He was a well-known watercolor and landscape artist, worked for the calendar company Brown & Bigelow for 40 years doing portrait art, and was also fairly well known in science fiction and fantasy circles for his surreal/fantasy pieces as well. Deciding that this was a project we would pursue, how it has been to work with the family, and how we hope to reach out to some new audiences through this are all things that I can talk about.Audra HilseAnoka County Historical Societyaudra@anokacountyhistory.org
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Engagement panel
Young Professionals panel
Lone Arranger panel
Born Digital Materials panel
Grants panel
Other