4th Grade GLCE Connections
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Grade 4 History ExpectationsArticle TitleIssue NumberMonths
Vol & Num
Era
Time Period
Lesson PlanOnline Activity
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H3 The History of Michigan (Beyond Statehood)
Use historical thinking to understand the past.
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4 – H3.0.1 Use historical inquiry questions to investigate the development of Michigan’s major economic activities from statehood to present. Examples of questions may include but are not limited to: What happened? When did it happen? Who was involved? How and why did it happen? How does it relate to other events or issues in the past, in the present, or in the future? What is its significance? Examples of economic activity may include but are not limited to: agriculture, mining, manufacturing, lumbering, tourism, technology, and research.This Land is My Land (Lesson)6
Mar/Apr 2016
v2n4Settlement to Statehood/Mining1805-2000X
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4 – H3.0.1Famous Fudge9
Nov/Dec 2016
v3n2Statehood/Mining to Modern1837-2000X
5
4 – H3.0.1Working the Line10
Jan/Feb 2017
v3n3Industrialization to Modern1900-2000
6
4 – H3.0.1The Fishing Line12
May/Jun 2017
v3n5Statehood/Mining to Modern1837-2000
7
4 – H3.0.2 Use primary and secondary sources to explain how migration and immigration affected and continue to affect the growth of Michigan.Meet Marylou Olivarez-Mason1
Mar/Apr 2015
v1n1Industrialization to Modern1900-2000XX
8
4 – H3.0.2From Germany to Michigan1
Mar/Apr 2015
v1n1Statehood/Mining1837-1900X
9
4 – H3.0.2Mexicantown1
Mar/Apr 2015
v1n1Industrialization to Modern1900-2000X
10
4 – H3.0.2The Copper Country's Chinese2
May/Jun 2015
v1n2Statehood/Mining1837-1900XX
11
4 – H3.0.2A Rose Garden For WWII's Japanese Americans4
Nov/Dec 2015
v2n2Industrialization 1900-1950
12
4 – H3.0.2Sour Grapes6
Mar/Apr 2016
v2n4Modern1950-2000
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4 – H3.0.2Arab-American Resources7
May/Jun 2016
v2n5Modern1950-2000X
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4 – H3.0.2Betty's American Dream8
Sep/Oct 2016
v3n1Modern1950-2000
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4 – H3.0.2Sayklly's: Candy "UP" North9
Nov/Dec 2015
v3n2Modern1950-2000
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4 – H3.0.2Sweet Beets9
Nov/Dec 2016
v3n2Statehood/Mining to Modern1837-2000
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4 – H3.0.2Working the Line10
Jan/Feb 2017
v3n3Industrialization to Modern1900-2000
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4 – H3.0.3 Use case studies or stories to describe the ideas and actions of individuals involved in the Underground Railroad in Michigan and in the Great Lakes region.George Dolarson: A Real Caretaker5
Jan/Feb 2016
v2n3Statehood/Mining1837-1900XX
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4 – H3.0.4 Describe how the relationship between the location of natural resources and the location of industries (after 1837) affected and continue to affect the location and growth of Michigan cities.Henry Lightbourne: Bath House Owner2
May/Jun 2015
v1n2Statehood/Mining1837-1900X
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4 – H3.0.4The Copper Country's Chinese2
May/Jun 2015
v1n2Statehood/Mining1837-1900XX
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4 – H3.0.4Part of Something Big2
May/Jun 2015
v1n2Statehood/Mining1837-1900X
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4 – H3.0.4The Doctor Said Take a Bath!2
May/Jun 2015
v1n2Statehood/Mining1837-1900X
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4 – H3.0.4Heavy Metal Rocks4
Nov/Dec 2015
v2n2Statehood/Mining1837-1900X
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4 – H3.0.4A Rose Garden For WWII's Japanese Americans4
Nov/Dec 2015
v2n2Industrialization 1900-1950
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4 – H3.0.4Freedom to Farm6
Mar/Apr 2016
v2n4Statehood/Mining1837-1900
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4 – H3.0.4Sweet Beets9
Nov/Dec 2016
v3n2Statehood/Mining to Modern1837-2000X
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4 – H3.0.4Working the Line10
Jan/Feb 2017
v3n3Industrialization to Modern1900-2000
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4 – H3.0.4The Fishing Line12
May/Jun 2017
v3n5Statehood/Mining to Modern1837-2000
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4 – H3.0.5 Use visual data and informational text or primary accounts to compare a major Michigan economic activity today with that same activity or a related activity in the past.Sacred Sugar9
Nov/Dec 2015
v3n2Mississippian to Modern900-2000X
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4 – H3.0.5Sweet Beets9
Nov/Dec 2016
v3n2Statehood/Mining to Modern1837-2000
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4 – H3.0.5Naturally Sweet9
Nov/Dec 2016
v3n2Exploration to Modern1600-2000X
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4 – H3.0.5Trash or Treasure?10
Jan/Feb 2017
v3n3Industrialization to Modern1900-2000
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4 – H3.0.5Meet Charles Caskey, A Grand Builder12
May/Jun 2017
v3n5Statehood/Mining1837-1900
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4 – H3.0.6 Use a variety of primary and secondary sources to construct a historical narrative about the beginnings of the automobile industry and the labor movement in Michigan. Examples may include but are not limited to: stories, photos, artifacts, oral history, letters. Working the Line10
Jan/Feb 2017
v3n3Industrialization to Modern1900-2000
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4 – H3.0.7 Describe past and current threats to Michigan’s natural resources and describe how state government, tribal and local governments, schools, organizations, and individuals worked in the past and continue to work today to protect its natural resources. Examples may include but are not limited to: the Flint water crisis, invasive species, loss of sturgeon and wild rice.The Place Where Food Grows on Water6
Mar/Apr 2016
v2n4Mississippian900-1600
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4 – H3.0.7Healing Root6
Mar/Apr 2016
v2n4Industrialization 1900-1950
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4 – H3.0.7The Land of the Crooked Tree5
Jan/Feb 2016
v2n3Statehood/Mining to Modern1837-2000XX
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G1 The World in Spatial Terms
Use geographic representations to acquire, process, and report information from a spatial perspective.
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4 - G1.0.1 Identify questions geographers ask in examining the United States. Examples may include but are not limited to: Where it is? What is it like there? How is it connected to other places?Maps: A Changing Art5
Jan/Feb 2016
v2n3Exploration1600-1800X
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4 - G1.0.2 Identify and describe the characteristics and purposes of a variety of technological geographic tools. Examples of purposes may include but are not limited to: measure distance, determine relative or absolute location, classify a region. Examples of tools and technologies may include but are not limited to: globe, map, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), satellite image.
Protect the Island (Lesson Plan)
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Nov/Dec 2015
v2n2Settlement1805-1837X
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4 - G1.0.2Maps: A Changing Art5
Jan/Feb 2016
v2n3Exploration1600-1800X
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4 - G1.0.2Early Tools That Led the Way5
Jan/Feb 2016
v2n3Exploration1600-1800
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4 - G1.0.2Counting Down the Miles5
Jan/Feb 2016
v2n3Modern1950-2000
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4 - G1.0.2Hidden History10
Jan/Feb 2017
v3n3Mississippian to Modern900-2000
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4 - G1.0.2Digging for History10
Jan/Feb 2017
v3n3Mississippian to Modern900-2000
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4 - G1.0.3 Use geographic tools and technologies, stories, songs, and pictures to answer geographic questions about the United States.Help the Coureur de Bois Find Their Way!1
Mar/Apr 2015
v1n1Exploration1600-1800
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4 - G1.0.3The Salty Mitten2
May/Jun 2015
v1n2Paleo/Archaic11,000 B.C.E.-1,000 B.C.E.X
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4 - G1.0.4 Use maps to describe elevation, climate, and patterns of population density in the United States.
Protect the Island (Lesson Plan)
4
Nov/Dec 2015
v2n2Settlement1805-1837X
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4 - G1.0.4Know to Grow6
Mar/Apr 2015
v2n4Modern1950-2000X
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4 - G1.0.5 Use hemispheres, continents, oceans, and major lines of latitude to describe the relative location of the United States on the world map.
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G2 Places and Regions
Understand how regions are created from common physical and human characteristics.
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4 - G2.0.1 Describe ways in which the United States can be divided into different regions. Examples may include but are not limited to: political regions, land-use regions, land-form regions, vegetation regions.Know to Grow6
Mar/Apr 2016
v2n4Modern1950-2000X
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4 - G2.0.2 Locate and describe human and physical characteristics of major U.S. regions and compare them to the Great Lakes region. Lighthouses: "Soldiers" on the Shores5
Jan/Feb 2016
v2n3Statehood/Mining to Industrialization1837-1950XX
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4 - G2.0.2Know to Grow6
Mar/Apr 2016
v2n4Modern1950-2000X
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G4 Human Systems
Understand how human activities help shape the Earth’s surface.
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4 - G4.0.1 Use a case study or story about migration within or to the United States to identify push and pull factors (why they left, why they came) that influenced the migration.Meet Marylou Olivarez-Mason1
Mar/Apr 2015
v1n1Modern1950-2000XX
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4 - G4.0.1 The Amazing Life of Elizabeth Dennison Forth1
Mar/Apr 2015
v1n1Settlement/Territorial1805-1837X
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4 - G4.0.1 From Germany to Michigan1
Mar/Apr 2015
v1n1Statehood/Mining1837-1900X
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4 - G4.0.1 Mexicantown1
Mar/Apr 2015
v1n1Industrialization to Modern1900-2000X
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4 - G4.0.1 Henry Lightbourne: Bath House Owner2
May/Jun 2015
v1n2Statehood/Mining1837-1900X
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4 - G4.0.1 The Copper Country's Chinese2
May/Jun 2015
v1n2Statehood/Mining1837-1900XX
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4 - G4.0.1 Learning to Save Lives3
Sep/Oct 2015
v2n1Industrialization to Modern1900-2000
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4 - G4.0.1 A Rose Garden For WWII's Japanese Americans4
Nov/Dec 2015
v2n2Industrialization 1900-1950
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4 - G4.0.1 George Dolarson: A Real Caretaker5
Jan/Feb 2016
v2n3Statehood/Mining1837-1900XX
65
4 - G4.0.1 Finnish Roots6
Mar/Apr 2016
v2n4Industrialization 1900-1950
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4 - G4.0.1 Betty's American Dream8
Sep/Oct 2016
v3n1Modern1950-2000
67
4 - G4.0.1 Sweet Beets9
Nov/Dec 2016
v3n2Statehood/Mining to Modern1837-2000
68
4 - G4.0.1 Working the Line10
Jan/Feb 2017
v3n3Industrialization to Modern1900-2000
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4 - G4.0.2 Describe the impact of immigration to the United States on the cultural development of different places or regions of the United States. Examples may include but are not limited to: forms of shelter, language, food.Meet Marylou Olivarez-Mason1
Mar/Apr 2015
v1n1Modern1950-2000
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4 - G4.0.2Mexicantown1
Mar/Apr 2015
v1n1Modern1950-2000X
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4 - G4.0.2The Copper Country's Chinese2
May/Jun 2015
v1n2Statehood/Mining1837-1900
72
4 - G4.0.2Sharing Culture Through Dance3
Sep/Oct 2015
v2n1Modern1950-2000
73
4 - G4.0.2Finish Roots6
Mar/Apr 2016
v2n4Industrialization 1900-1950
74
4 - G4.0.2Sayklly's: Candy "UP" North9
Nov/Dec 2015
v3n2Modern1950-2000
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4 - G4.0.2Zee the Cook11
Mar/Apr 2017
v3n4Modern1950-2000
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4 - G4.0.3 Describe some of the movements of resources, goods, people, and information to, from, or within the United States, and explain the reasons for the movements. Examples may include but are not limited to: movement of fossil fuels, clothing, retirees, refugees, migrant farm workers, and manufacturing jobs into and within the United States. Meet Marylou Olivarez-Mason1
Mar/Apr 2015
v1n1Modern1950-2000
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4 - G4.0.3The Copper Country's Chinese2
May/Jun 2015
v1n2Statehood/Mining1837-1900
78
4 - G4.0.3Finish Roots6
Mar/Apr 2016
v2n4Industrialization 1900-1950
79
4 - G4.0.3Betty's American Dream8
Sep/Oct 2016
v3n1Modern1950-2000
80
4 - G4.0.3Sayklly's: Candy "UP" North9
Nov/Dec 2016
v3n2Modern1950-2000
81
4 - G4.0.3Working the Line10
Jan/Feb 2017
v3n3Industrialization to Modern1900-2000
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G5 Environment and Society
Understand the effects of human-environment interactions.
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4 - G5.0.1 Assess the positive and negative consequences of human activities on the physical environment of the United States and identify the causes of those activities.Lighthouses: "Soldiers" on the Shores5
Jan/Feb 2016
v2n3Statehood/Mining to Industrialization1837-1950XX
84
4 - G5.0.1The Land of the Crooked Tree5
Jan/Feb 2016
v2n3Statehood/Mining to Modern1837-2000XX
85
4 - G5.0.1The Place Where Food Grows on Water6
Mar/Apr 2016
v2n4Mississippian900-1600
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4 - G5.0.1Old Trails, New Roads10
Jan/Feb 2017
v3n3Woodland to Modern1000 B.C.E- 2000
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4 - G5.0.1The Fishing Line12
May/Jun 2017
v3n5Statehood/Mining to Modern1837-2000
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C1 Purposes of Government
Explain why people create governments.
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4 - C1.0.1 Identify questions political scientists ask in examining the United States. Examples may include but are not limited to: What does government do? What are the basic values and principles of American democracy? What are the roles of the citizen in American democracy?Fighting for Freedom4
Nov/Dec 2015
v2n2Statehood/Mining1837-1900X
90
4 - C1.0.1Michigan at War (Activity)4
Nov/Dec 2015
v2n2Territorial to Industrialization1805-1950XX
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4 - C1.0.1This Land Is My Land6
Mar/Apr 2016
v2n4Settlement/Territorial1805-1837
92
4 - C1.0.1Michigan Tribal Governments: Nations Within a Nation8
Sep/Oct 2016
v3n1Mississippian to Modern900-2000
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4 - C1.0.1Branches of Power Activity8
Sep/Oct 2016
v3n1Statehood/Mining to Modern1837-2000XX
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4 - C1.0.2 Describe the purposes of government as identified in the Preamble of the Constitution.Branches of Power Activity8
Sep/Oct 2016
v3n1Statehood/Mining to Modern1837-2000XX
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C2 Democratic Values and Constitutional Principles of American Government
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4 - C2.0.1 Explain how the principles of popular sovereignty, rule of law, checks and balances, separation of powers, and individual rights serve to limit the powers of the federal government as reflected in the Constitution and Bill of Rights.
Examples may include but are not limited to: individual rights (e.g., freedom of religion, freedom of expression, freedom of press).
Branches of Power Activity8
Sep/Oct 2016
v3n1Statehood/Mining to Modern1837-2000XX
97
4 - C2.0.2 Describe how rights are guaranteed by the Constitution, including the Bill of Rights, and Democratic Values are involved in everyday situations. Examples of rights may include but are not limited to: voting, freedom of religion, freedom of expression, freedom of press. Examples of values may include but are not limited to: common good, equality, individual rights, justice (fairness), right to alter laws.Sour Grapes6
Mar/Apr 2016
v2n4Modern1950-2000X
98
4 - C2.0.2 Meet Eva Hamilton: Lady Legislator8
Sep/Oct 2016
v3n1Industrialization to Modern1900-2000
99
4 - C2.0.2 My State, My Laws8
Sep/Oct 2016
v3n1Statehood/Mining1837-1900
100
4 - C2.0.2 The Not So Open Road10
Jan/Feb 2017
v3n3Industrialization to Modern1900-2000
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