Digital Humanities Centers
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Hi. Thanks for looking at this spreadsheet!
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Its original aim was to examine Digital Humanities Centers around the world, taking particular note of departmental/disciplinary affiliation, on-campus location, and library & information science involvement. Other fields, such as “Date Established” and “Geographical Location” were added early on for a more complete view (and hopefully an interesting dataset). The large majority of the centers on it are pulled from centerNet’s elaborate list, with a few others added as I (Sarah) have come across them elsewhere. I hope that the categories in the sheet should be fairly straightforward, but some Explanatory Notes are included in a separate tab.
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Things we’d like your help with:
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-Translations: The only languages I know well are (American) English and Latin. Translations are mainly provided by Google Translate, so there are almost definitely some errors.
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-Question marks & blank spaces: Some centers have all the info we were looking for nicely laid out in an easily navigable site. Others don’t. I did my best to track down dates/affiliations/etc, but sometimes could not be sure.
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-Centers themselves: We have relied heavily on Diane M. Zorich’s 2008 Survey of Digital Humanities Centers in deciding how to define a DH center for the purposes of this spreadsheet, and have used Zorich’s definition of a “center focused” DHC: “Centers organized around a physical location, with many diverse projects, programs, and activities undertaken by faculty, researchers, and students. These centers offer a wide array of resources to diverse audiences. Most DHCs operate under this model.” [http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub143/execsum.html] We have therefore excluded virtual centers, collaboratories, standalone projects, etc. If we’ve missed a DH center that fits these categories (or excluded one that doesn’t), please feel free to add it to the spreadsheet or let us know.
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In an attempt to standardize at least some of the columns, I have listed geographical locations as City, State/Province, Country, or in the case of United Kingdom centers, City, Country, Sovereign State. This is based entirely off of Wikipedia’s designations, and not off my own experience or knowledge of the areas. If any geographical location or other column on this spreadsheet shows a lack of political or cultural awareness (disputed boundaries, names, ownership, etc), please correct me and/or the spreadsheet!
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In general, if you can flesh out or correct any information, or add any centers not included, please do. Your help is greatly appreciated with this!
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A list of the centers with Twitter accounts can be found here: https://twitter.com/#!/sehovde/dh-centers.
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This effort is part of a larger initiative funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to support cross-pollination between iSchools and Digital Humanities Centers. For over three years the project partners have been placing Library and Information Science Masters students as interns in working digital humanities centers, with the larger aim of advancing digital humanities practice. The participants, which include the Information Schools at Maryland, the University of Texas, and the University of Michigan, as well as Nebraska’s Center for Digital Research in the Humanities and Michigan State’s MATRIX, alongside of MITH, have developed a collaborative research program that draws on complementary areas of expertise and interest in the digital humanities and information studies. Since 2009, we have supported 24 interns working on a diverse range of DH projects, including a web archive for born-digital electronic literature, a description scheme and model for the preservation of vintage computers, the analysis and documentation of best practices for digital oral history, and topic modeling on a collection of Civil War newspapers. Building on our 2010 presentation at the annual Digital Humanities conference, we are currently writing a white paper and article that lay a foundation for future partnerships and discuss the need to bring research libraries into the equation, as well as point to cross-over opportunities in the areas of digital libraries, digital curation, and archives. For more information, see http://www.ischooldh.org/.
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Introduction
Digital Humanities Centers
Explanatory Notes