Possible GISES Electives
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GISES UPPER DIVISION ELECTIVES
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The courses listed below are all appropriate for the upper division elective requirement for the Global Information and Social Entrepreneurship Studies (GISES) Minor and Sociology Intensive Major
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Note: Students still need to write a justification for how all of their upper-division elective courses fit together to help the student's growth as a technology activist and/or technology linked social chagne advocate after graduation
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If you would like to take a course that is not listed below for GISES credit, please contact Professor Chris Benner ahead of time to make sure it is a good fit. Substitutions are definitely allowed for appropriate courses
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Department
Course Number
TitleDescription (from 2016-17 Course Catalog)
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Anthropology110APublic Life and Contemporary IssuesHow can cultural anthropology help us to understand current events unfolding locally, nationally, and globally? Students learn how to "read" newspapers differently--that is, through the lens of cultural analysis. The world of everyday politics and society, as it unfolds in debates happening right now, forms the topical substance of the course. (Formerly course 4.) (General Education Code(s): IM.) The Staff
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Anthropology110EAnthropology of Global Environmental ChangeIntroduces anthropological and historical approaches to environmental change and globalization. Key themes include: capitalism and industrialization, environmental politics, global culture, and relations between humans and other species. (General Education Code(s): PE-E.) The Staff
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Anthropology129
Other Globalizations: Cultures and Histories of Interconnection
The history of social and cultural interconnections at a global scale. Anthropological approaches to the study of cultural encounter are used to investigate topics such as trade, religion, and citizenship and to evaluate shifting concepts of civilization and barbarism. Prerequisite(s): course 2. A. Tsing
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Anthropology130A-XEthnographic Area Studies[For GISES students, these should be linked to the area of project work]
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Anthropology131Women in Cross-Cultural PerspectiveExamines the diversity of women's as well as men's roles, experiences, and self-conceptions in a number of societies to explore how women and men shape, and are shaped by, particular forms of social life. Prerequisite(s): course 2. R. Ramirez
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Anthropology138Political AnthropologyThe ideas, in selected non-Western societies, about the nature of power, order, social cohesion, and the political organization of these societies. (Also offered as Legal Studies 138. Students cannot receive credit for both courses.) Offered in alternate academic years. The Staff
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Anthropology144Anthropology of Poverty and WelfareExamines phenomena of poverty and welfare in cross-cultural perspective with an emphasis on critical ethnographies and social analyses of social pathologies, economic systems, and community. Topics include informal economies, labor, household systems, social-support networks, and public policies. M. Caldwell
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Anthropology146Anthropology and the EnvironmentExamines recent approaches to study of nature and the environment. Considers historical relationship between nature, science, and colonial expansion as well as key issues of contemporary environmental concern: conservation, environmental justice, and social movements. Prerequisite(s): course 2. (General Education Code(s): PE-E.) A. Mathews
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Anthropology148Gender and Global DevelopmentUses the critical tools of feminist theory and cultural anthropology to look at how global development discourses and institutions mobilize, reinforce, and challenge systems of gender-based inequality. Topics include non-governmental organizations (NGOs), development practice, microcredit, and technocrat cultures. (Formerly Gender and Development.) (Also offered as Feminist Studies 148. Students cannot receive credit for both courses.) M. Moodie
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Anthropology154Multimedia EthnographyStudents learn the fundamentals of photography or video production and audio recording in order to create mini-ethnographies. Prerequisite(s): courses 1, 2, and 3. Concurrent enrollment in course 154L is required. Enrollment restricted to anthropology majors. (General Education Code(s): PR-C.) The Staff
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Anthropology158Feminist EthnographiesConsiders the relationship between anthropology and feminism. Provides historical perspective on gender inequalities in the discipline as well as the emergence of feminist anthropology. Students read and engage with examples of feminist ethnography form a variety of regions and subfields. M. Moodie
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Anthropology159Race and AnthropologyExamines concept of race in anthropology. Begins with histories of race in anthropology; turns to contemporary analysis of racism, identity formation, and diaspora; and concludes with current debates on the validity of "race" as an object of analysis. (General Education Code(s): ER.) M. Anderson
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