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DateTimeLocationSpeakerInstitutionTitleAbstractPoster/Abstract

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Spring 2014

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February 43:30 - 4:30 p.m.OLRI 241Isabelle MoulinierThomson ReutersWhat is data science?Poster

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February 183:30 - 4:30 p.m.OLRI 241Katie St. ClairCarleton CollegeModels for estimating animal abundance and species diversityPoster

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February 253:30 - 4:30 p.m.OLRI 241James ProppUMass LowellQuasirandom processesPoster

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March 43:30 - 4:30 p.m.OLRI 241Rob ThompsonMacalester CollegeSymmetry: From black holes to broken eggsPoster

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March 253:30 - 4:30 p.m.OLRI 241Magda StolarskaUniversity of St. Thomas Cells and tissues obey Newton’s laws: Mathematical modeling of growth and motion in biological systemsPoster

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April 1st3:30 - 4:30 p.m.OLRI 250Tom EricksonIBM Watson LabsRevealing the missing masses: Using shared visualizations to enhance online collaborationPoster

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April 174:40 - 5:40 p.m.OLRI 250Francis SuHarvey Mudd CollegeVoting in agreeable societiesPoster

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Fall 2013

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September 103:30 - 4:30 p.m.OLRI 250Amy Csizmar DalalCarleton CollegeSelf-Healing Home Networks: Challenges and OpportunitiesIncreasingly, our lives are online, and increasingly, we access our online lives from home. Unless you are an IT expert, or happen to live with an IT expert, setting up, maintaining, and troubleshooting a home network is a difficult task. On top of this, much of what we're doing on our home networks---gaming, streaming videos and music, Skyping, and other "rich media" applications---requires high bandwidth, low-loss, trouble-free connectivity. In this talk, I'll explore the idea of "self-healing home networks", or networks that can troubleshoot and maintain themselves without human intervention. Such networks have the potential to improve the quality of user experience, especially with rich media applications, and to revolutionize the design of future computer networks and protocols. I'll start by talking about how we measure the "quality of user experience" for streaming video, discuss some of the key questions and challenges in designing and building self-healing networks for the home, and address some of the user interface issues involved as well. This talk will feature student work from my lab as well as some contributions from our inaugural summer computer science institute for high school students.Poster

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September 254:40 - 5:40 p.m.JBD Lecture HallLou GrossUniversity of TennesseeBest in a Biological Context: Optimization across the Biological HierarchyMany central concepts in biology involve notions of what is "better" or "best" in the context of evolution, physiology, and behavior. Similarly, in many applied areas of the life sciences, we are concerned with developing a "best" method to carry out drug therapies, resource harvesting, pest management, and epidemic control. I will discuss, with audience participation, what it might mean to be "best" for several problems at different levels of the biological hierarchy. This includes being clear about differences between maximization and optimization, and taking account of constraints, historical and others, on biological systems. Finally, I will discuss notions of optimal control in biology.Poster

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October 83:20 - 4:20 p.m.OLRI 254MSCS FacultyMacalester CollegeInformal MSCS Graduate School Info SessionPoster

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November 53:30 - 4:30 p.m.OLRI 250Brent HechtUniversity of MinnesotaThe Mining and Application of Diverse Cultural Perspectives in User-Generated ContentWikipedia articles, tweets, and other forms of user-generated content (UGC) play an essential role in the experience of the average Web user. Outside the public eye, UGC has become equally indispensable as a source of world knowledge for systems and algorithms that help us make sense of big data. In this talk, I will demonstrate that UGC reflects the cultural diversity of its contributors to a previously unidentified extent and that this diversity has important implications for Web users and existing UGC-based technologies. Focusing on Wikipedia, I will show how UGC diversity can be extracted and measured using diversity mining algorithms and techniques from geographic information science. Finally, through two novel applications – Omnipedia and Atlasify – I will highlight the exciting potential for a new class of technologies enabled by the ability to harvest diverse perspectives from UGC.Poster

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November 123:30 - 4:30 p.m.OLRI 250Gunnar CarlssonStanford UniversityThe Shape of DataPoster

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November 193:30 - 4:30 p.m.OLRI 250Alicia JohnsonMacalester CollegeBayesian Statistics: "The Theory that Would Not Die"Poster