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Course NumberCourse TitleSection TitleSection NumberInstructorCourse Description

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ANTH 352.01Topics in AnthropologyCaribbean Cultures in the Atlantic World01LenikANTH 352.01 Caribbean Cultures in the Atlantic World (4). This course draws from anthropology, ethnohistory, and related fields to track how peoples and cultures of the Caribbean islands have shaped, and have been shaped by, the process of becoming integrated into the Atlantic World. Since the initial encounters among Europeans and indigenous Caribbean peoples, Atlantic entanglements have influenced interactions that occurred in venues that include missions, plantations, and the tourist sites of the contemporary Caribbean. During the semester-long course, students will examine anthropological approaches to identity formation, culture change, and intra- and inter-island variation among Caribbean peoples. Students are expected to have taken lower-level anthropology courses, and assessment will consist of in-class exams, presentations, and a research paper.

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ARTH 350The Art of Contact: Spain, New Spain and Peru, 1492-185001Phillips, R.A study of art and architecture created in Spain and the Viceroyalties of New Spain and Peru from 1492 through 1850. This course begins with an introduction to the Aztec, Inca and European Renaissance artistic traditions that provide the context for understanding the cultural contact and exchange that followed Christopher Columbus’s 1492 voyage. The class will trace points of contact between the Old and New Worlds from the early 16th century through the Independence of Mexico and Peru in the mid-19th century. Particular foci will be national identity, racial and class divisions, and the subversive messages that the post-Contact arts of Latin America often embody. Slide presentations, lectures and discussion. Prerequisite is one of the following: ARTH 100, one 200-level ARTH course or consent of instructor

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ARTH255Introduction to Latin American Art and Architecture01Phillips, R.This class is a selective introduction to the art and architecture of the Americas from the earliest civilizations to the present. The course surveys a diverse range of visual culture from ancient Mesoamerica and the Andes through the Colonial, post-Independence, Modern, and Contemporary periods. Students will gain a basic understanding of the history of artistic production and intercultural interaction through the study of representative works of art and architecture from each period and region. Analysis takes an interdisciplinary approach to examine the continuities and changes in the form, function, and symbolism of Latin American art and architecture over time. Particular focus includes cultural confluence and the concept of style, the role and representation of national identity, and art and political resistance. Image-based lectures will be supplemented with various multimedia tools, discussion, and in-class activities. No prerequisites. This class satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Cultural Perspectives.

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ARTH440Art and Landscape in Context: Creating a Virtual Exhibition01Phillips, R.This experimental course is a cross-cultural exploration of the relationships of art and architecture to landscape across time and space through the development of a virtual exhibition. From references to sacred mountains in India, caves in Maya art and architecture, and the implementation of water in Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater, artists and architects have approached the land around them in a myriad of ways. As part of our examination, we will create a virtual exhibition of art and landscape that will remain on view well past the length of the class. Readings, group discussion and written assignments will develop student ability to read and write critically about art in context and the development, execution and evaluation of virtual exhibitions. Students will learn art historical research methodologies, the basic principles of exhibition design, curatorial practice and interpretive planning. Prerequisite is one of the following: ARTH 100, one 200-level art history course, MUST 200 or consent of the instructor.

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BIOL 101.01Contemporary Bioscience:Environmental Science04HatchBIOL101.01. Contemporary Bioscience: Environmental Science. 4 Credits. Contemporary Bioscience introduces concepts fundamental to all biology. The objectives of this section of contemporary bioscience are to introduce students to biological and ecological concepts through the study of ecology and then to use these concepts to explore the relationship of humans to their environment. It focuses on human-environment relationships from the standpoint of humans as animal organisms subject to the same constraints as all other animals as well as from the viewpoint of humans as sentient, social, political, economic, and creative animals. A second objective of this course is to promote scientific literacy and the ability to read and think critically about issues in the area of overlap between the life sciences and the social sciences. The goal is put students in a position to read and evaluate ecological and environmental issues in order to develop your own opinions so that they can vote on environmental issues from a position of understanding established through critical evaluation. Finally, a general theme throughout the course will be the exploration of the methods of science and science as a way of knowing. You should learn to question everyone and everything as any good scientist would do. Thus, critical thinking and the ability to sift through mountains of information in order to uncover the useful bits, should be added to our objectives. This course does not meet the requirements for a degree in biology. Students, who intend to major in biology, enter the health care professions, or who desire a more comprehensive study of biological principles should consider enrolling in BIOL 105 and 106 (Principles of Biology I and II). This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Natural Sciences with Laboratory and the requirement for a biology course with environmental emphasis for the Environmental Studies minor. Lecture and lab.

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BIOL 380.01Topics in BiologyEcological Theory and Modeling04RauschertBIOL380.01. Ecological Theory and Modeling. 4 Credits. This course explores ecological theory in a quantitative way. Students will learn to implement, parameterize and analyze classical and applied ecological models. Ecological topics will include population growth, disease dynamics, spatial models, metapopulations, game theory, and network theory. The course will emphasize biological conservation and applied ecological problems. Weekly paper discussion will focus on particular applications of the models discussed. Students will each complete a project focused on an ecological problem of their choice. A variety of software will be taught, including R. No prior programming experience is assumed. Lecture and Lab. Prerequisites: Biol 271 and a college-level mathematics class or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 380.02Topics in BiologyPractical Computing for Biologists04EmersonBIOL380.02. Practical Computing for Biologists. 4 Credits. Biological data is getting more expansive with every passing year, making it necessary to develop new computational approaches to gather, sort, analyze, and visualize data. This course will survey a variety of computational approaches used in the analysis of biological data. This course is specifically designed for students with little-to-no experience writing computer code. Students will experience working in a UNIX-like environment, be introduced to a variety of scripting languages (Python, Perl, Ruby, R, bash), and be introduced to the creation and use of databases. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: BIOL271and BIOL271L, or permission of instructor.

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BIOL 380.03Topics in BiologyInterpreting the Estuary03Tanner/CohenBIOL 380.03. Interpreting the Estuary. 4 Credits. The primary goal of this cross-listed (with MUST 390) special topics course is to design interpretative materials for the redesigned estuarine biology exhibit at the Calvert Marine Museum. Students will be introduced to science museums, including the exhibition and interpretation of displays of estuarine organisms and ecosystems, and learn about estuarine ecology through lecture, laboratory and exploratory experiences in the St. Mary’s and Patuxent River estuaries. Class meetings will occur both at St. Mary’s College and the Calvert Marine Museum, and transportation will be provided to the museum. Biology majors may apply two credits from this course towards the requirement for upper division elective credit in biology. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: the Core Curriculum requirement in Natural Sciences with Laboratory.

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CORE101First Year SeminarMarriage/Family/Religious Values22BasaranMarriage, Family, Religious Values: A Multicultural Perspective

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CORE101First Year SeminarEthics of Global Aid23Taber

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CORE101First Year SeminarWhere Am I? Who Am I?24StaffNavigating the Politics of Difference

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CORE101First Year SeminarPimp My Ride01FordThe unprecedented scale of contemporary materialism and consumption raises disquieting questions about wealth and poverty, character and equality, and collective and individual identities built on ethnicity, class, sexuality, and gender. This seminar will address complex issues of materialism and consumption—through space and time—to reveal cultural, political, and ethical consequences. Students will explore a brief history of early Western attitudes towards commerce and consumption that continues to influence thinking today, an overview of the many and diverse claims and critiques of capitalism and consumption, and a synthesis and analysis of materialism and cross-cultural consumption practices from a contemporary context. Why *do* we wear our bling on our sleeves? Do the things we make and own, make and own us? The lamentation of materialism and its minion conspicuous consumption is loud indeed—but is it all bad?

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CORE101First Year SeminarMarket vs. Morals09StabileFor over a century in the U.S. opponents of the market economy have attacked it for the immoral behavior its stress on greed has allegedly generated. From this perspective, a moral economy is one whereby economic decisions are made with an attitude of doing what is right and fair in order to achieve social justice; markets need to be regulated or supplemented by government programs. In contrast, advocates for the market approach focus on economic incentives, that is, doing what leads to higher profits for business and higher pay for managers, workers and other employers. To them, the stress on morals as embodied in government programs assumes that the government's behavior is more moral than business. In this course we will examine critically both sides of this debate over greed.

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CORE101First Year SeminarThe Size of Government10RhineThis seminar covers the contrasting philosophical arguments on whether a country should have a large national government or a small national government. We also discuss important historical events and their relation to the debate on the size of government. Lastly, we analyze the current trend in the size of the U.S. federal government and cover recent economic research on the subject.

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CORE101First Year SeminarRadioactive Ants Meet the Crab Robots: Soviet and American Science Fiction during the Cold War16BarrettThis class will examine international and domestic themes in science fiction novels, short stories, and cinema from the 1940s through the 1960s in the United States and the Soviet Union. In both countries, science fiction could be a means of criticizing the cold war enemy, but it was also a mirror for examining domestic threats such as conformity, lack of freedom, and the potential dangers of technology. Although science fiction in both countries shared some concerns about mass society in the future, it also developed quite different themes, which is unsurprising given the different social and political contexts. A major purpose of this class will be to examine the similarities and differences of science fiction in both countries and why science fiction was so important to both cultures. Why did American science fiction so frequently imagine invasion, dystopia, and apocalypse, while Soviet science fiction presented instead mutual coexistence and peaceful evolution? And why was science fiction able to approach controversial themes, on both sides of the Iron Curtain?This seminar covers the contrasting philosophical arguments on whether a country should have a large national government or a small national government. We also discuss important historical events and their relation to the debate on the size of government. Lastly, we analyze the current trend in the size of the U.S. federal government and cover recent economic research on the subject.

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CORE101First Year SeminarShanghai Story17MusgroveThis course will look at more than a century and a half of dramatic changes in China through focusing on the most dynamic city in China’s modern history: Shanghai. We will trace the city’s rise as a cosmopolitan center of trade and foreign culture, its ambiguous place in Chinese revolutionaries like the Nationalists and the Communists, its impact during the Maoist era, and the explosion of growth that has occurred since the reform era began in early 1980s. This will be an interdisciplinary and multimedia course with history, literature, images, films and more as our tools for understanding this slippery subject.

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CORE101First Year SeminarEnergy Options, Nuclear & Other25HillOne feature of the 20th century was the accelerating increase of technology. Rapid change had major effects on the political and social world. One iconic image relates to the discovery of nuclear fission in the first half of the century, but there were others. The course will look at topics related to the advance.

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CORE301Inquiry in the Liberal ArtsFrom Jupiter to Jesus Roman Relig02Hall, LRoman religion focused on the proper procedures for pleasing the ancient gods to ensure positive outcomes in warfare, agriculture, health, and romance. Chief of the Roman gods was Jupiter or Zeus, the “father of gods and men.” We will examine not only Roman beliefs about the power of the pagan gods and goddesses but also focus on the role of priests and priestesses in performing correct rituals. We will examine the rise of Christianity with its focus on Jesus as the son of God and study how the new religion gradually replaced the old practices and beliefs. Close study of ancient evidence will enable you to examine these issues in depth from an historical vantage point.

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CORE301Inquiry In the Liberal ArtsEntrepreneurship: Business/Social03OsbornIn this course we will examine factors that lead people to undertake entreprenuerurial activities. We will test our own entrepreneurial spirits through the development of both business and social enterprises. Business entrepreneurs typically measure performance in profit and return, but social entrepreneurs also take into account a positive return to society. Social entrepreneurship typically furthers broad social, cultural, and environmental goals.

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CORE301.01Inquiry in the Liberal ArtsScience and Technology-Because we can, should we?01WynnScience and Technology - Because we can, should we? (4 credits)

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ECON 459Seminar in EconomicsGlobal Poverty01Dowla, AMore than 2 billion people in the world live under $1.25 a day. In this seminar, we will learn how to measure poverty and discuss the implications of its various manifestations: vulnerability, insecurity, ill health, cognitive deficits, social exclusion etc. Further, we will study flagship anti-poverty programs such as microfinance, cash and conditional cash transfers, guaranteed employment and other policies to reduce poverty.

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EDUC 331Topics in Behavior-Related Disorders01Koch, K.This course will explore three particular types of exceptional needs that influence an individual's behavior: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Autism Spectrum Disorders, and Emotional/Behavioral Disorders. In addition, this course will consider how these needs can manifest in the classroom and other learning contexts and the ways in which teachers may respond to those needs. There will be some consideration of the long-term influence of these disorders on the individual's life. This course cannot be used to fulfill the special education requirement/ component of MAT pre-requisites.

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EDUC 333 Topics in Giftedness and Twice Exceptional Students01Koch, K.This course will explore conceptions and implications of 'giftedness' in individuals in various educational contexts and beyond, including consideration of students who are 'gifted' and have also been diagnosed with a disorder or disability. In addition, this course will consider legal protections of this particular student population and the long-term influence of giftedness on the individual's life. This course cannot be used to fulfill the special education requirement/ component of MAT pre-requisites.

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ENGL106Intro to Literature 01Bates, R.This section of Introduction to Nature will explore humans’ changing relationship to nature. Literature reflects how that relationship has changed over the centuries. Whereas the ancient Greeks saw nature as a potentially angry god (Euripides’ The Bacchae) and the Middle Ages associated nature with sin (Sir Gawain and the Green Knight), Shakespeare saw nature as a refuge from a corrupt civilization (As You Like It) and William Wordsworth saw it as a locus of spiritual meditation. In addition to these older works, we will look at such contemporary authors as Wendell Berry, Lucille Clifton, Mary Oliver, Leslie Marmon Silko (Ceremony), Toni Morrison (Song of Solomon), Cormac McCarthy (All the Pretty Horses), and perhaps Barbara Kingsolver (Flight Behavior). This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts. The course counts towards the Environmental Studies minor. Prerequisite: ENGL102, CORE101, NITZ180, or CORE301.

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ENGL130Literary TopicsDetective Fiction 01Nelson, C.This course will focus on detective stories and novels in nineteenth- and twentieth-century America. More specifically, we will examine the ways in which these stories both reflect and engage with their historical, political, and cultural contexts. This class will also consider how particular literary and intellectual movements (e.g. romanticism, modernism, postmodernism) shape the detective story form. Syllabus may include works by authors such as Edgar Allan Poe, Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, Chester Himes, Walter Mosley, Paul Auster, James Ellroy, and Laurie King. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in the Arts.

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ENGL204Reading and Writing in the Major 01Wooley, C.The goal of ENGL 204 is to teach students reading and writing skills particular to literary study, to enable them to better manage the historical and topical content of 200 & 300-level literature classes. In this course: (1) Students will hone and refine their ability to do close readings of both primary and secondary texts. (2) They will learn to identify formal elements that contribute to a text’s meaning (such as symbolism, meter, etc.). (3) In order to write better literary analyses, they will learn to pose questions about a text that are both worth asking, and also answerable in the time they have allotted. (4) They will learn to formulate a literary argument; to support their argument with evidence from their reading of a primary text (and secondary texts, if appropriate); and to revise their work in response to critiques. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENGL102, CORE101, NITZ180, or CORE301.

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ENGL204Reading and Writing in the Major 02Chandler, K.The goal of ENGL 204 is to teach students reading and writing skills particular to literary study, to enable them to better manage the historical and topical content of 200 & 300-level literature classes. In this course: (1) Students will hone and refine their ability to do close readings of both primary and secondary texts. (2) They will learn to identify formal elements that contribute to a text’s meaning (such as symbolism, meter, etc.). (3) In order to write better literary analyses, they will learn to pose questions about a text that are both worth asking, and also answerable in the time they have allotted. (4) They will learn to formulate a literary argument; to support their argument with evidence from their reading of a primary text (and secondary texts, if appropriate); and to revise their work in response to critiques. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENGL102, CORE101, NITZ180, or CORE301.

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ENGL235Topics in Literature and CultureAfrican-American Expression 01Coleman, J.This course will examine the multiple roles of African-American creativity in the expressive arts. The disciplines of history, fiction, poetry, film, and music from the 1800s to the present will be explored in order for students to gain a deeper cultural understanding of how American scholars and artists of African descent have played essential roles in shaping and defining America's identity, history, thought, and culture from slavery to the present. Students are required to determine if a singular and dominant theme exists with respect to African American expression over the centuries and across disciplines, or if multiple and competing themes have emerged. Students are also required to contextualize and relate the purpose and function of the theme(s) to America as a whole, from the early days of the slave narrative to the rise and global expansion of hip hop culture. These issues and others will be explored from a range of creative artists, including Ryan Coogler (Fruitvale Station), Percival Everett (Erasure), James Weldon Johnson (Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man), Nella Larsen (Passing), Spike Lee (Bamboozled and portions of Do the Right Thing), Solomon Northup (12 Years a Slave), Ntozake Shange (For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Enuf ), Alice Walker (The Color Purple), and others. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Cultural Perspectives. This course counts toward the African-African Diaspora Studies minor. Prerequisite: ENGL102, CORE101, NITZ180, or CORE301.

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ENGL355Couples Comedy 01Bates, R.We will look at relationship comedies from the British Restoration and 18th century, concluding in the Regency period with Jane Austen’s first novel. The works will include bawdy poetry by “the libertine,” John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester; Restoration comedies by William Wycherley (probably The Country Wife) and Aphra Behn (The Rover); poetry by Alexander Pope (Rape of the Lock); neo-Restoration comedies by Oliver Goldsmith (She Stoops to Conquer) and Thomas Sheridan (School for Scandal); and novels by Henry Fielding (Tom Jones), Fanny Burney(Evelina) and Jane Austen (Sense and Sensibility). Undergirding the course will be two theories of comedy, the hard view of Thomas Hobbes (comedy as attack) and the soft view of the Earl of Shaftesbury (comedy as sympathetic identification). Since comedy today continues to fall into these two camps, we will compare the above works with couples comedies in contemporary television and film. Prerequisite: ENGL281, 282, 283, or permission of the instructor. Recommended: ENGL281 (for topics before 1700), ENGL282 (for topics after 1800), or ENGL283 (for topics after 1900). Prerequisites if you are in the 2012 Catalog or later: ENGL 204 and one of the following: ENGL 281, 282, 283, or permission of the instructor.

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ENGL355British Modernism 02O'Sullivan, B.This course will focus on literary modernism in three cultural sites in the United Kingdom from 1900 to the 1920’s: the Irish Literary Revival (especially Yeats); the Bloomsbury movement (especially Virginia Woolf); and the avant-garde movements centered around London before and around the First World War (which we’ll study by looking directly at Little Magazines and poetry anthologies from that period). Our questions will include how modernism responded not only in themes but it literary form to modern conditions of living. Prerequisite: ENGL281, 282, 283, or permission of the instructor. Recommended: ENGL281 (for topics before 1700), ENGL282 (for topics after 1800), or ENGL283 (for topics after 1900). Prerequisites if you are in the 2012 Catalog or later: ENGL 204 and one of the following: ENGL 281, 282, 283, or permission of the instructor.

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ENGL355Victorian Time Machines03Bates, T.The reign of Queen Victoria saw the advent of universal education, as well as the adoption of standard rail time, and a growing call for international standards keyed to observatories such as England's own in Greenwich. The mass production of time pieces became possible by mid-century, and by 1890's watch ownership was so cheap as to be nearly universal. Out of this maelstrom of time machines arose both the genre of science fiction and innumerable characters obsessed with the mechanization of time. This class will review the relationship between the novel, perhaps the era's most remarkable time technology, and the historical scene that set structures of time into place that are still prevalent today. The course will begin with David Copperfield's infant cry, twinned with the tolling of a clock (David Copperfield[1849]), and move through the Carroll's watch-toting white rabbit (Alice in Wonderland [1865]), William Morris's dreamer of the future (News from Nowhere [1890]), HG Wells's famous time traveler (The Time Machine [1895]), and end with the mysterious attempt to blow up time as memorialized by Joseph Conrad in his Secret Agent [1907]. Prerequisite: ENGL281, 282, 283, or permission of the instructor. Recommended: ENGL281 (for topics before 1700), ENGL282 (for topics after 1800), or ENGL283 (for topics after 1900). Prerequisites if you are in the 2012 Catalog or later: ENGL 204 and one of the following: ENGL 281, 282, 283, or permission of the instructor.

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ENGL390Topics in LiteratureContemporary Multicultural Voices 01Coleman, J.Toni Morrison once wrote, “There is something called American literature that, according to conventional wisdom, is certainly not Chicano literature, or Afro-American literature, or Asian-American literature, or Native American.” Where, then, does one place the twentieth and twenty-first century literature produced by Latino/Hispanic, African-American, Asian-American, and Native American writers? Conventional wisdom has improved since Morrison’s statement and the population of the United States has become more diverse; however, there is still a tendency to think of writers from traditionally underrepresented communities as separate, exotic or Other. This course will focus on writers who fall within these categories and who represent a multitude of American cultures. We will pay special attention to the subject matter these writers choose and the aesthetics they employ. For example, are the writings intended to be representative of specific communities or are they intended to be universal? Are the works intended to be political, literary, or both? What is the difference between those distinctions? Is it possible for a literary work to be political or culturally representative and “good” or does socially aware literature fall into the realm of propaganda rather than art? Are these writers attempting to “fit in” to mainstream America or rejecting certain aspects of America for the sake of maintaining a strong sense of cultural identity? How do we define “American” or “mainstream American literature” in the twenty-first century, especially in light of recent immigration patterns? In addition, how does a writer’s gender or sexual orientation, when paired with racial or ethnic identity, impact our expectations or relationship to the text? Do we, as intelligent and informed readers, have certain expectations of writers from various communities? These issues and others will be explored through the writings of Sherman Alexie, Julia Alvarez, Edwidge Danticat, Junot Díaz, Khaled Hosseini, David Henry Hwang, Jamaica Kincaid, Jhumpa Lahiri, Chang-rae Lee, Toni Morrison and others. Prerequisite: ENGL281, 282, 283, or permission of the instructor. Recommended: ENGL281 (for topics before 1700), ENGL282 (for topics after 1800), or ENGL283 (for topics after 1900). Prerequisites if you are in the 2012 Catalog or later: ENGL 204 and one of the following: ENGL 281, 282, 283, or permission of the instructor.

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ENGL395Advanced Topics in WritingNature Writing Workshop 01Chandler, K.This course will provide an opportunity to develop and refine writing skills. You will have four months to immerse yourself in writing, reviewing, and reading what is re-emerging as an important and popular literary prose genre in America: the nature essay. While we will turn to books and essays as models for content, form, and style, this is a writing course; that means that you will write or rewrite for every class meeting. Writing will be our primary activity and the focus of our discussions. Since this is a workshop, you will also be expected to comment constructively aloud and in writing on each other’s pieces. And, since writing about the natural world must be based on your experience—past and continuing—you will keep a field journal of nature observations, working to discover the value of your own perceptions through writing. Prerequisite: One 200-level writing course or permission of the instructor. This class counts toward the Environmental Studies Minor.

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ENGL410Studies in AuthorsEliot and Dante 01Wilson, B.T.S. Eliot called Dante the greatest influence on his work, and in many ways paved the way for the twentieth-century perception of the medieval poet’s work. In exploring this influence, we’ll be reading as much of the two poets as we can, and we’ll be reading both not only as embodiments of their own tumultuous times but as poets who speak directly and freshly to us today of our human condition. Hopefully our understanding of one poet will deepen our understanding of the other in the way that, as both poets believed, the past and the present continually illuminate one another. Prerequisites: ENGL 304 and one 300-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

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ENGL410Studies in AuthorsFaulkner, Cather, Hurston 02Chandler, K.Created by a people from their land and tales, regional literature evokes visions both geographical and human. While the land is never separate from the story, questions arise as to source, mode, and inspiration. Willa Cather claims that “The history of every country begins in the heart of a man or a woman,” while William Faulkner laments the futility of chronicling a people and a land, asserting that “two hundred years had not been enough.” Zora Neale Hurston dramatizes more than philosophizes. Hurston’s more direct approach and emphasis on characters’ voices brings into consideration narrative style in the construction of regional qualities. Focusing on the interplay of natural history and social history, this course will begin with these authors’ short stories and progress to longer fiction. Novels will include Cather’s O Pioneers! and My Antonia, Faulkner’s Go Down, Moses and The Sound and the Fury, and Hurston’s Jonah’s Gourd Vine and Their Eyes Were Watching God. As a 400-level seminar, students should be prepared to encounter criticism and theory in their readings and incorporate them into writings and discussions. If they have not done so already, students are encouraged to take ENGL 283 concurrently with this course. Prerequisites: ENGL 304 and one 300-level literature course or permission of the instructor. This course counts toward both WGSX and ENST minors.

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ENGL430Woman WordAnglo-American Women Write the Novel 01Cognard-Black, J.Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar began their revolutionary study of female authorship with the following question: “Is a pen a metaphorical penis?” This course will consider both the motivation behind, and the consequence of, Gilbert and Gubar’s self-consciously seminal question by reading and talking about all kinds of novels by Anglo-American women, from Aphra Behn to Jeanette Winterson, Jane Austen to Audre Lorde. Since women have written beautiful poetry, produced successful plays, and shot exquisite films, why focus on the novel? Because the novel is the genre most often associated with “the feminine” in Western literature (even now, 80% of habitual novel-readers are women), and it is the literary form females have written most. The novel is also deeply creative—elastic and eclectic. It was and is the popular culture of its day (from eighteenth-century Gothic thrillers to contemporary romance novels), and it remains an experimental form, containing most other genres (including poetry, the essay, travel writing, autobiography, philosophy, scientific inquiry, photography, and film) between its covers. In addition to examining Anglo-American women’s novels across the 300 years of their publication, this course will also ask students to analyze the history of literary criticism about women’s writing from Virginia Woolf on and to view such criticism as creative texts in and of themselves—texts that are often fantastical and highly subjective. Thus, over the term, students should expect to read a good bit of literary criticism as well as upwards of ten to twelve novels, watch at least one film, and be ready to produce their own “woman words.” The final course project will be the production of an anthology of Woman Word, authored by the students themselves. Prerequisites: English 304 and one 300-level literature course or permission of the instructor. This course also counts towards the WGSX minor.

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HIST 415.01Topics in American HistoryThe U.S. During the World War I Era01HoldenHIST 415.01 (4) This is a reading -and writing-intensive course on the World War I Era in U.S. history (1900s-1920s). At the same time that industrial capitalism in the late 1800s had catapulted the U.S. into the position of an economic power, Americans still worried about its place in the world. Once World War I erupted in Europe in 1914, Americans engaged each other in a lively debate over its identity and its future. Would an industrializing, globalizing U.S. be able to maintain its traditional isolationism? Should it? This debate did not diminish significantly even after the Americans entered the fighting. And the American experience during the war, as it turned out, also left many of those debates unresolved as the 1920s began.

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HIST 455.01Topics: Asian, African, Latin American HistoryPeople's Republic of China01MusgroveHIST 455.01. People's Republic of China (4) This course focuses on the People’s Republic of China, from the rise of the Chinese Communist Party and the successful revolution in 1949, through the infamous political campaigns of the Maoist era and into the reform era under Deng Xiaoping and after. Along the way we will evaluate why Maoism was so appealing in China, how common people experienced life under Mao, the underlying tensions that led to the extremes of the Cultural Revolution, and the sources of China’s more recent successes under the reform-era ideal of “Socialism with Chinese Characteristics.”

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HIST 475.01Topics in Comparative, Global and Thematic HistoryHistory of the Family in Europe and the U.S. from the Middle Ages to the Present01AdamsHIST 475.01 History of the Family in Europe and the U.S. (4) Family history, as a highly interdisciplinary field, has close affinities with anthropology, demography, sociology, and women's studies. Family historians deal with issues of class, culture, gender, religion, public and private life, and politics. This course will be organized thematically, and cover the classic works and theories in the history of the family, as well as the more recent challenges to these theories. It will also explore questions about meanings of family, how those meanings are constructed, and how they have changed over time.

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ILCF 362Topics in French LiteratureComedy and Social Commentary01Doggett, L.Comedy makes us laugh at the world we live in but also stop to question it and perhaps ourselves as well. In this course we will read and analyze a range of comedic plays and other works from the 11th through the 18th centuries, asking how they work as comedies and what ideas they advance or undermine. We will also examine the social and institutional forces of the time and their influence on the theatre. Finally we’ll consider changing roles of the theatre and playwrights and their interactions with various groups in society.

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MATH444Mathematical Modeling01KoseMathematical Modeling

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MUST 390.01Topics in Museum StudiesInterpreting the Estuary01Cohen/TannerMUST 390.01. Interpreting the Estuary. 4 Credits. The primary goal of this cross-listed (with BIOL 380.03) special topics course is to design interpretative materials for the redesigned estuarine biology exhibit at the Calvert Marine Museum. Students will be introduced to science museums, including the exhibition and interpretation of estuarine organisms and ecosystems, and they will learn about estuarine ecology through lecture, laboratory and exploratory experiences in the St. Mary’s and Patuxent River estuaries. Class meetings will occur both at St. Mary’s College and the Calvert Marine Museum, and transportation will be provided to the museum. Biology majors may apply two credits from this course towards the requirement for upper division elective credit in biology. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: the Core Curriculum requirement in Natural Sciences with Laboratory.

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PHIL 380Philosophical TopicsResponsibility and Reparation01EmerickIn this course we will explore different philosophical accounts of moral responsibility and the obligation to make amends for wrongful actions.  We will focus in particular on whether you can justifiably be held responsible for actions that are outside of your control. This will involve studying moral luck, moral dilemmas and the problem of dirty hands, various types of determinism, and whether you can make amends for wrongs committed by another.

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PHIL 380Philosophical TopicsHappiness & Meaning02TaberNot many would deny that living a meaningful life is desirable, although they might well disagree with each other about what it takes to make a life meaningful. Some hold that one merely needs to be fully engaged in life for it to be meaningful. Others object that a life of games shows and pork rinds is bereft of meaning, and that the more fully engaged in such a life, the more pathetic one’s life would be. Others hold that in order for a life to have meaning it must have some purpose greater than itself, whether that purpose is saving souls, saving the environment, or saving coins for a collection. Still others hold that meaningfulness is meaningless, and that talk of it should be jettisoned in favor of what makes us happy.  But then happiness comes with its own questions, many of which are similar to those for meaningfulness. Is happiness a matter of having pleasant feelings, or of achieving a life well lived?  (Ans: there are philosophers on both sides of this one.)  How does one judge what will make one happy?  (Ans: not very well, psychologists find.)  To what extent is poverty detrimental to (or even productive of) happiness, and what are the implications for global economic development?  (Ans: sticky question, economists find.) Through readings both classic (Tolstoy, Nietzsche, Camus) and contemporary (Martin, Gilbert, Graham), each seminar participant will craft and share a coherent stand on happiness and meaning, thereby having an answer to that proverbial, annoying uncle at Thanksgiving who asks, “I hear you took a philosophy class. So tell me: what’s the meaning of life?”

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POSC 385.01Topics in Political Science or Public PolicyAfrican Politics01CarterThis course is an introduction to the contemporary politics of Africa. One of the main goals of the course will be to explore the causes and consequences of the wide variation that we witness in African political institutions and processes. Therefore, the course will draw heavily on cross-national research, though we will also explore some single country case study work. Thematically, this course will investigate questions that are common to many developing countries, including ones that interrogate the quality of institutions, the state of the economy, the nature of identity and the varied ways in which political leaders manage conflict and violence. The vast majority of the class focuses on contemporary African politics, however, we will spend a few class sessions exploring the pre-colonial and colonial African context and the legacies that colonialism generated in Africa. The last segment of the class will focus on special topics, including the politics of disease, hunger and oil.

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POSC 385.02Topics in Political Science or Public PolicyThe Maryland Poll Project02GroganPOSC 385.02: The Maryland Poll Project (4) The course will survey theory and methods of public opinion research, including studying established academic and private polls and the clientele that they serve such as campaigns, government, interest groups, the public, and the media. Students will learn about survey sampling, question design, survey testing, analysis, and publication of results and will gain first-hand experience in the laboratory components of the course. Using various polling technologies and methods, the class will field on-campus, local, and state-level public opinion polls. These polls will measure the opinions of likely Maryland voters prior to the 2014 election, seek to validate local election results, and establish baseline statistical data for campus voting. This course will require extensive interaction with the community.

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RELG 328Topics in Religion and PsychologyReligious Healing and Psychotherapy01MeckelComparative studies of religious healing and contemporary psychotherapy as they generate specific understandings of human suffering and the means to its alleviation. Students will study diverse forms of healing – ecstatic and visionary experience, faith healing, spirit possession, witchcraft, and shamanism – and relate these to the narrative and psychodynamic therapies. Broad theoretical issues to be engaged in our comparisons include the relation of culture and psyche, the embodied dimension of ritual and emotion, and the nature of religious experience. Readings for the class are drawn from the disciplines of religious studies, psychological and medical anthropology, applied and theoretical psychology, and philosophy. The course is writing intensive, discussion-based, and self-exploratory.

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SOCI 352.01Topics in SociologyU.N. Millennium Goals 201501DaughertySOCI 352.01: Special Topics: United Nations Millennium Goals (4) United Nations Millennium Goals: challenges in the relationship between culture and policy. In 2000, The United Nations adopted a declaration to reduce extreme poverty world-wide by the year 2015. There are eight goals and 32 indicators to evaluate progress. As we near the year 2015, it is time to take a look and evaluate how different countries have attempted to meet the goals. We will discuss the challenges that countries face. Using the sociological and demographic perspectives we will explore the relationship between social policy, social change, and individual decision-making.

The specific goals are: eradicate extreme poverty and hunger, Achieve universal primary education, promote gender equality and empower women, reduce child mortality, improve maternal health, combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases, ensure environmental sustainability, and develop a global partnership for development.

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TFMS 260Topics in Dance/Movement Dance of the Pacific Islands: Celebration of Culture and the Folk Dance Forms of the Philippines and Hawaii 01Cruz, L.This course will focus on the traditional folk dance forms of the Philippines and the Hawaiian Hula. Both of these Pacific Island dance forms are highly practiced and appreciated amongst the Filipino and Hawaiian people. Students will: 1) learn the history, techniques, and meanings of the different Filipino and Hawaiian folk dance forms; 2) learn common themes, techniques of performance, and backgrounds of important Pacific Islanders in the performing arts; and 3) increase awareness and gain a better understanding of the Philippine and Hawaiian cultures through active participation in dancing and creating simple costumes and musical instruments. No prerequisites. Satisfies ASIA minor requirement.

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TFMS 260Topics in Dance/MovementEnvironmental Dance02Taylor, M.This course will provide students with the opportunity to learn about choreographers and performers whose work explores the relationship between humans and the natural environment and to conduct their own “experiments in environment.” Students will create works based on viewings/readings of work by Anna Halprin, Eiko and Koma, Jennifer Monson, Montana Transport Company, and others, as well as through active dance/movement improvisation in the class room and in outdoor sites on campus. Previous dance training is helpful but not required. Prerequisite: No prerequisite. This course may be used to satisfy an elective requirement in the Environmental Studies Minor.

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The course provides a systematic approach to mathematical modeling; construction and analysis of continuous and discrete mathematical models inspired by real life problems. The existing models and the mathematical ideas used in these are studied. Using examples from a variety of fields such as physics, biology, engineering and economics, students will learn how to develop and use mathematical models of real-world systems. Prerequisite: MATH 312 or the consent of the instructor.

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