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Course NumberCourse TitleSection TitleSection NumberInstructorCourse Description

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ART 105Introduction to Visual Thinking Landscape1STAFFThis course considers different approaches to observing and reading the landscape. The class begins by observing the landscape of St. Mary’s County in terms of its natural and political histories. We will then look at the diverse social and environmental theories that shape our thinking about landscape, before shifting focus to consider ideas of globalization. Students will create artworks that communicate their ideas about the landscape and its history and future using a variety of technologies such as drawing, photography, image appropriation, and intervention. The class will have three visual projects: One looking at natural history, focusing on alterations in the landscape made by human incursion and environmental forces, the next considers globalization's marks on the landscape and the third approaches landscape as conceptual art. Aside from these visual projects, the course includes readings, field trips, research techniques, and written assignments. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

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ART 333Adv Topics in ArtArt for Video Games1FriebeleThis course is based on collaboration. Through a semester-long project we will create original artwork for functional video games. This class will run parallel to COSC 438 Game Design and Development and will feature cross-disciplinary collaboration. This venture will highlight several important aspects inherent to contemporary digital art, such as interactivity, open source, time-based media, virtuality, Human Computer Interfaces, and the production of art using digital tools. To this end, no single software or tool will suffice for the total creation of this project. We will also work with drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, video, sound, vectors, bit-map, animation, print and possibly 3D modeling. Weaving the necessary pieces of the creative process together will require a strong work ethic, and will result in an applied understanding of how to connect diverse media in order to express the desired meanings and effects. Through the lens of this project students will learn theoretical aspects concerning the video game and work in teams to generate games that explore original concepts.

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ARTH 355Adv Topics in Global Art HistoryGlobal Architecture and the Built Environment1PhillipsThis course presents an introduction to some of the major architectural traditions of the Americas, Africa, Asia, Oceania, and Europe from the earliest known developments of buildings and cities through today. Through an exploration of theoretical ideas related to space, time, and place, readings, discussions, and lectures will be arranged thematically and chronologically to provide a deeper context from which to view and decipher not only the architecture around us but the overall concept of built environment. Through our examinations of the dynamic relationships among architectural form, function, style, and location students will consider architecture and the built environment in relationship to various forms of cultural knowledge, including political and social structures as well as religious thought.

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CORE 101First Year Seminar"ATTA Way" Anthropology, Travel, Tragedy and Adventure.1RobertsExploration, adventure, discovery - these typical travel terms today are used to characterize "educational tourism" (aka study abroad), but also characterize the past achievements of individuals and disciplines such as anthropology. In this seminar we employ, with all due respect to C. Wright Mills, the "anthropological imagination" as a means to examine the stories of individual anthropologists, explorers and seamen. Their adventures epitomize the triumphs and tragedies of their times. Our twin goals are to critically examine their stories at the intersections of biography and history, and imagine our own future travel aspirations or adventures in light of what we have learned from them.

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CORE 101First Year SeminarLiberation Rhetoric: In the Beginning was the World12DennieThe struggle for freedom is one of the most defining elements of the human experience. From Cicero to Robespierre, from Thomas Jefferson to Abraham Lincoln, from Mahatma Gandhi to Nelson Mandela, from Martin Luther King to Barack Obama, this struggle has also been defined by the words of extraordinary men and women whose rhetoric of liberation has come to occupy an almost sacred place in the meanings we attach to freedom today. This course therefore examines the role of speech writing and speech making in the struggle for human freedom and explores the processes through which the language of freedom and the meanings of freedoms have shifted through times.

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CORE 101First Year SeminarThe Many Lives of Abraham Lincoln13HoldenWithout question Abraham Lincoln remains a figure of extraordinary interest for many people. But who was he? With so many Lincoln legends, is there still such a thing as the "real" Abraham Lincoln? This seminar will examine both what Lincoln's actual life was like and how the image of Abraham Lincoln has been utilized in the decades since. We will examine the creation and the meanings of the image of Lincoln as the "rail-splitter" and "Honest Abe" while he was alive, as well as the modern image of Lincoln as cyborg and vampire hunter.

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CORE 101First Year SeminarMaking an Honest Living: Doing Well by Doing Good17Stein

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CORE 101First Year SeminarTheory & Practices of Nonviolence18vonKellenbachThe twentieth century was one of the bloodiest in human history, with millions of lives lost to two world wars, the Holocaust, genocides, and repressive regimes using lethal force to control minority and majority populations. It has also brought forth movements that used and advocated non-violence as a strategy to resist violence. We will study the philosophical, religious and political principles of non-violence, as they were developed by Mahatma Gandhi and adopted by Martin Luther King and others. We will also examine particular conflicts in which men and women risked their lives to challenge brutal governments non-violently, and asked why they were able to succeed. This course discusses the theories of non-violence and examines its effectiveness as a political strategy.

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CORE 101First Year SeminarTheory & Practices of Nonviolence19vonKellenbachThe twentieth century was one of the bloodiest in human history, with millions of lives lost to two world wars, the Holocaust, genocides, and repressive regimes using lethal force to control minority and majority populations. It has also brought forth movements that used and advocated non-violence as a strategy to resist violence. We will study the philosophical, religious and political principles of non-violence, as they were developed by Mahatma Gandhi and adopted by Martin Luther King and others. We will also examine particular conflicts in which men and women risked their lives to challenge brutal governments non-violently, and asked why they were able to succeed. This course discusses the theories of non-violence and examines its effectiveness as a political strategy.

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CORE 101First Year SeminarCritical Views of Communal Space: The Politics of Public Art20BorosThe main purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the many links between art, creativity, political life, revolution, and community-building, as well as the relevant key concepts, theories, and political theorists who have made contributions to the field of study. Public art- art that is created, enacted, or placed, in our public spaces- in particular is interesting to consider, as it brings the experience of art to the general public. In this way, it is inherently democratic. The student will work with a variety of readings in political philosophy, as well as in contemporary art and cultural theory.

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CORE 101First Year SeminarWorking25RushingHow will the shape of your work life differ from that of previous generations? In what ways do jobs affect people's lives outside of work? And how do changes in work lies affect the communities in which we live? In this course we'll examine changes in the nature of work and explore the relationships etween work and wellbeing, personal identity, and community.

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CORE 101First Year SeminarGettin' It On: Love & Desire30Anderson

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CORE 301Inquiry in the Liberal ArtsFrom Jupiter to Jesus Roman Religion2Hall, LThis course will introduce students to stimulating scholarly work while enhancing the student's own academic skills. Roman religion focused on the proper procedures for pleasing the ancient gods to ensure positive outcomes in warfare, agriculture, health, and romance. Chief of the Roman gods was Jupiter of Zeus, the "father of gods and men." We will examine not only Roman beliefs about the power of the pagan gods and goddesses but also focus on the role of priests and priestesses in performing correct rituals. We will examine the rise of Christianity with its focus on Jesus ans the son of God and study how the new religion gradually replaced the old practices and beliefs. Close study of ancient evidence will enable you to examine these issues in depth from an historical vantage point.

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ENG 130Literary Topics Reading Nature 1Chandler Whoever you are, wherever you live, what is most important in life connects in some way to your relationship with land, water and air; it is the integration of your inner with your outer world. A good way to understand ourselves, therefore, can come from reading about the ecologies to which we belong and reading the ecologies themselves. One goal is to use our reading—experiential and intellectual—to think about our individual relationship with our environment. Another goal will be to learn this place, and to that end, we will use Chancellor’s Point at Historic St. Mary’s City as our site for exploration and the focus for our research and writing. As a means of investigating our collective relationship with the natural world, all course projects will be directed to museum visitors of HSMC. This course counts for credit in the ENST and MUST Programs. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in the Arts. Recommended for both majors and non-majors, but not required of majors.

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ENG 235Topics in Literature and Culture Mysteries of Identity 1Wilson From ancient times to the present, from East to West, this course looks at how people have imagined the nature of identity. Works might include the Bhagavad Gita, Kenko’s Essays in Idleness, Boethius’s Consolation of Philosophy, Isak Dinesen’s Winter’s Tales, R.K. Narayan’s The Guide, Dai Sijie’s Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress, and Annie Proulx’s “Brokeback Mountain.” This course counts for credit in the Asian Studies Program. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in cultural perspectives. Recommended for both majors and non-majors, but not required of majors. May be repeated for credit if the topic is substantially different. Prerequisite: ENGL 102, CORE 101, NITZ 180, or CORE 301.

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ENG 355Studies in British Literature Shakespeare1CharleboisIn this course we will read works written throughout Shakespeare’s twenty-year career as a dramatic poet including several English history plays and selected comedies and tragedies. We will explore how the plays both reflect and participate in debates about hotly contested issues of the early modern period including kingship, religion, sex, and gender. While the emphasis in the course will be on how Shakespeare’s plays might be understood as culturally specific expressions of the English Renaissance, we will frequently examine scenes from contemporary film adaptations, attend one live production, and experiment with performance ourselves to see how Shakespeare is interpreted on stage and through the lens of contemporary culture. Twelve plays will be selected from the following list of titles: Richard III, Richard II, Henry IV (parts 1 and 2), Henry V, The Comedy of Errors, Two Gentlemen of Verona, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night, Titus Andronicus, Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, Antony and Cleopatra, Coriolanus, and Cymbeline. Given the pace and intensity of the course, previous experience with Shakespeare, Renaissance literature, and/or English 281 is recommended. Prerequisites: ENGL 204 and one of the following: ENGL 281, 282, 283, or permission of the instructor. Recommended: ENGL 281 (for topics before 1700), ENGL 282 (for topics after 1800), or ENGL 283 (for topics after 1900)

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ENG 365Studies in American Literature Whitman, Dickinson, and the Politics of Contemporary Poetry 1AndersonWhy, in the 21st century, do we still care so passionately about Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson? We’ll answer this question by examining the love and the loathing they have inspired in over a century of creative and critical writing. First, we’ll ask how these poets’ work inspired heated arguments about how experimental poetic form is connected to cultural, racial, sexual and national identity. In the second part of the course, we’ll be looking at how contemporary writers have found ways to follow and break with the traditions established by these two icons of American poetry. . Students may take this course at the 300 or 400 level; reading expectations will differ slightly and writing length expectations will differ more substantially between the levels. At either level, this course may be counted towards a WGSX minor. Prerequisites: ENGL 204 and one of the following: ENGL 281, 282, 283, or permission of the instructor. Recommended: ENGL 281 (for topics before 1700), ENGL 282 (for topics after 1800), or ENGL 283 (for topics after 1900).

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ENG 365Studies in American Literature Modernist Poetry in America 2O’SullivanThis course will build a story of American modernist poetry from 1912 to about 1951, focusing primarily on poets who lived and worked in the United States—including Wallace Stevens, William Carlos Williams, Marianne Moore and Langston Hughes. We’ll see how writing in a New World sometimes gave these poets a perspective on tradition and change that differed from the perspectives of their expatriate colleagues, like Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot and H.D. in London and Gertrude Stein in Paris. And we’ll see that some of these poets coupled formal experimentation with rhetorical engagement in many of the transformative issues of the day, including issues of gender, race and national identity. Prerequisites: ENGL 204 and one of the following: ENGL 281, 282, 283, or permission of the instructor. Recommended: ENGL 281 (for topics before 1700), ENGL 282 (for topics after 1800), or ENGL 283 (for topics after 1900).

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ENG 380Studies in World Literature The Tale of Genji 1WilsonA semester-long look at The Tale of Genji, the cornerstone of Japanese literature composed by a court woman named Murasaki Shikibu in the eleventh century. Known (inappropriately but understandably) as the world’s first novel, the work employs the changing seasons as a metaphor for human destiny and expresses better than any work of literature the Japanese feeling for the inter-relationship of human life, art, and nature. Readings will include selected works influenced by the tale from the fifteenth through the twentieth centuries. This course counts for credit in the Asian Studies Program. Prerequisites: ENGL 204 and one of the following: ENGL 281, 282, 283, or permission of the instructor.

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ENG 390Special Topics in Literature Books that Cook 1Cognard-BlackGiven their sensory and sensual nature, cookbooks and culinary narratives suggest an implicit relationship between author and audience beyond the bounds of mere reading. When one person writes down a recipe for another, a moment of cultural work has been enacted. The giver imparts a simultaneous history of region, family, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality, whereas the receiver re-enacts these multiple histories the moment she or he cooks and consumes the dish. This course will discuss such cultural work by exploring how different literary genres (recipes, cookbooks, polemics, poetry, memoir, fiction, and film) represent the production and presentation of food for various rhetorical aims. Moreover, since this course is specifically focused on issues of gender and sustainability within culinary culture, discussions will center on how is food and food writing is gendered as well as on how food sustains the body, community, nation, and planet. In addition to the anthology Books that Cook: The Making of a Literary Meal, texts will include parts of cookbooks; perhaps a children’s book or two; polemics such as Fast Food Nation, The Omnivore’s Dilemma, and/or Animal, Vegetable, Miracle; food memoirs such as Halleluiah! The Welcome Table, Little House in the Big Woods, or Toast; foodie fictions such as The Debt to Pleasure, Heartburn, Like Water for Chocolate, Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Café, Chocolat, Delicious!, and/or A Carol Dickens Christmas; and at least one film. In addition to reading and discussing these texts, students will write both critical and creative assignments, including their own piece for a final, collaborative literary cookbook. Students should also expect to participate in out-of-class activities engaging food and foodways within our community, such as a Writers Harvest reading to raise money for Share Our Strength, an organization that fights child hunger. Note: while no knowledge of food preparation is expected, this class does ask that students engage in a certain amount of cookery. This course counts for credit in the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Prerequisites: ENGL 204 and one of the following: ENGL 281, 282, 283, or permission of the instructor.

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ENG 395Advanced Topics in Writing Creative Non-Fiction Workshop 1HammondCreative nonfiction, a relatively new and increasingly popular prose genre, is (as the name suggests) both “creative” and “nonfictive.” At root, creative nonfiction involves an imaginative engagement with the real. That is, it combines the shaping presence of the imagination with a deep and honest exploration of factuality. The imaginative element demands a strong and consistent point of view, which is why most creative nonfiction is autobiographical in mode. But in its factual dimension, creative nonfiction goes beyond memoir and autobiography in order to make a point, convey information, and/or deliver an insight. The course offers an extensive study of and intensive workshop in the genre. Prerequisite: one 200-level writing course and/or the permission of the instructor.

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ENG 395Advanced Topics in Writing Advanced Poetry2ColemanIn this intensive poetry-writing workshop, advanced poets will learn to create, refine, and critique more constructively, deepen their relationship to the creative process, and read collections by emerging and established poets and critics. Most of class time will be spent discussing student writing or experimenting with creative/imaginative techniques, but coursework also requires attending outside readings, maintaining a notebook or journal, conferencing with the instructor, and preparing a midterm portfolio as well as a final portfolio of well-polished poems. This course will also explore the use of traditional and modern forms of poetry and contemplate the multiple ways in which poetry can be experienced, inhabited, and comprehended. Prerequisite: one 200-level writing course and/or the permission of the instructor.

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ENG 410Studies in Authors Whitman, Dickinson, and the Politics of Contemporary Poetry 1AndersonWhy, in the 21st century, do we still care so passionately about Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson? We’ll answer this question by examining the love and the loathing they have inspired in over a century of creative and critical writing. First, we’ll ask how these poets’ work inspired heated arguments about how experimental poetic form is connected to cultural, racial, sexual and national identity. In the second part of the course, we’ll be looking at how contemporary writers have found ways to follow and break with the traditions established by these two icons of American poetry. . Students may take this course at the 300 or 400 level; reading expectations will differ slightly and writing length expectations will differ more substantially between the levels. At either level, this course may be counted towards a WGSX minor. Prerequisites: ENGL 304 and one 300-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

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ENG 430Special Topics in Literature Scream and Shout!: American Literature and Music as Social Protest 1ColemanThis course will examine protest-oriented 20th and 21st Century American literature and music—works that directly address or confront the shortcomings of the status quo. While protest has been instrumental to America’s overall development, this course will focus primarily but not exclusively on materials from the end of WWII to the present. Various socio-historical topics will be addressed, including the rise of Rock and Roll in the late 1950s, the multiple movements of the 1960s and their legacy, opposition to the occupation of Iraq, and the current relationship between art and social forces. Protest movements are often complex entities and they usually transcend boundaries; however, for the sake of coherence, we will focus primarily on the three types of protest that have been most prominent in past sixty-plus years: 1) Protests against governmental repression, oppression, or co-optation; 2) protests against intolerance and/or discrimination, and 3) protests against the Vietnam War and the Iraq War. These issues will be examined through the writings of Peter Blecha, Alexander Bloom and Wini Breines, Ray Bradbury, bell hooks, Moisés Kaufman, Audre Lorde, Tim O’Brien, Anna Deavere Smith, David Henry Hwang, selections from Poets against the War, and others. We will also examine these issues through the lyrics and/or performances of 4th25, Anti-Flag, Tori Amos, India.Arie, Bad Religion, Beastie Boys, James Brown, T-Bone Burnett, Tracy Chapman, John Coltrane, Coup, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Dead Prez, Ani DiFranco, Dixie Chicks, Dr. Dre, Bob Dylan, Eminem, Lupe Fiasco, Ella Fitzgerald, John Fogerty, Aretha Franklin, Michael Franti and Spearhead, Funkadelic, Garbage, Marvin Gaye, Grandmaster Flash, Green Day, Jimi Hendrix, Billie Holliday, Ice-T, Immortal Technique, Isley Brothers, Jurassic 5, KRS-One and Boogie Down Productions, Talib Kweli, Last Poets, Queen Latifah , John Lennon, Le Tigre, Curtis Mayfield, John (Cougar) Mellencamp, Mos Def , Nas, Me’Shell Ndégeocello, N.W.A., Sinéad O’Connor, Paris (the rapper, not the Hilton), Parliament, Pearl Jam, Pink (featuring Indigo Girls), Pretenders, Prince, Public Enemy, Radiohead, Rage Against the Machine, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Kenny Rogers, The Roots, Gil Scott-Heron, Pete Seeger, Sex Pistols, Tupac Shakur, Nina Simone, Sly and the Family Stone, Bruce Springsteen, Edwin Starr, System of a Down, Talking Heads, Sara Thomsen, U2, Stevie Wonder, Neil Young, and others. This course counts for credit in the Africa/African-Diaspora Studies Program. Prerequisites: English 304 and one English 300-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

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ENG 495 Studies in Creative Writing The Novella 1GabrielIn this course, we will examine what makes a novella tick. We’ll spend some time talking about what a novella even is—and how it’s different from the novel and short story. To this end, we’ll read a number of exemplary novellas, a provisional list of which includes William Maxwell’s So Long, See You Tomorrow, Earnest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea, Gabriel Garcia-Marquez’s No One Writes to the Colonel, James M. Cain's The Postman Always Rings Twice, Andrea Barrett’s Ship Fever, Tim Krabbe’s The Rider, Friedrich Dürrenmatt’s The Pledge, Annie Proulx’s Brokeback Mountain, Alice Munro’s “A Wilderness Station,” Richard Bausch’s Peace, Christine Schutt's Florida, and Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness. We’ll also of course write our own novellas; along the way, we’ll do exercises that will help in this endeavor. And, through regular workshops, we will provide one another with useful feedback on our works-in-progress. Prerequisites: ENGL 304 and one 300-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

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ENST 350Topics in Environmental StudiesEnvironmental Field Methods1StaffThis course is designed to introduce students to both standard and emerging tools and equipment used in field environmental investigations through directed readings and hands-on field exercises. Students will learn basic qualitative and quantitative field research techniques; experimental design principles; data handling, analysis, and presentation in oral and written forms. Students will learn to develop and to apply basic field skills, including habitat description; methods for sampling plants, animals, soils, water, and microclimate; and observational and manipulative techniques to address ecological, conservation, and management questions.

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ENST 350Topics in Environmental StudiesEnviornmental Law, Science, and Policy2StaffThis course provides students with a broad survey of U.S. environmental policy and policy analysis. A historical perspective on the political and legal frameworks for precedent-setting statutes will be accompanied by critical investigation into the contributions and limits of science in policymaking, the interactions of environmental policies and societies, and a comparison of national and international policy structures, processes, and outcomes, and outcomes. Topics include: air and water pollution, hazardous waste, agriculture and genetically modified organisms, endangered terrestrial and marine species protection, energy, disasters, conservation, conflict, and peace building.

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ENST 450Seminar in Environmental StudiesApplied Sustainability Practicum: Community Sustainable Development1MuchnickThis course carefully considers sustainability. Class sessions will combine seminar style discussion of classic and cutting edge readings in the history, contemporary context, and challenge of global environmental issues with hands-on workshops to advance student-initiated local projects in critical environmental topics. Students will work independently and in groups on research, writing assignments, presentations, and creative and technical projects focused on interdisciplinary solutions to pressing environmental issues. Topics covered include stewardship, healthy natural and built environments, green innovation, design, and construction best practices, as well as the broader contexts of energy managment, food systems, social justice, conservation ecology, campus sustainability, natural disasters, resilience, climate change adaptation, and other student interests. Students will develop important skills in self-directed learning, building partnerships across campus and the community, and engage in applied problem-solving. Approximately 1/2 of the classes will take place off campus in conjunction with high school students at the Forrest Career and Techology Center. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

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HIST 224Introduction to Historical Methods1BrodksyHistorical Methods serves as an introductory course to the discipline of History. Students will be introduced to and will get a chance to practice the skills of historical reading and thinking, the techniques of historical research, the steps involved in organizing and structuring an argument and a research essay, and the coventions of historical writing. The development of these skills will culminate in the creation and presentation of a research paper. This course is recommended for students in their early stages of their college careers.

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HIST 292Topics in HistoryAsian Studies1MusgroveThis course will introduce students to the major religious, philosophical, cultural, and historical legacies of Asia, which include but are not limited to the regions of India, China, and Japan. In addition to investigating Asia’s past, we will also look briefly at contemporary circumstances and the complicated relationships between past and present, modernity and national identity, continuity and change. Along the way, we will be introduced to a variety of disciplinary approaches used in understanding Asia today. Our tools shall be reading ancient and modern texts, watching films and documentaries, participating in special events and programs focused on Asia, and sharing our responses to these media in our daily discussions.

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HIST 292Topics in HistoryMaritime History of the Western World 1415-19182GreeleyWith the capture of the North African ports of Ceuta and Mellila by Portugal in 1415, Western Europe stopped retreating before the forces of Islam and began a period of expansion and conquest that would last over 500 years. The purpose of this course is to give students a general overview and a better understanding of how the development of the ocean going ship allowed Europeans to establish maritime supremacy over much of the rest of the world. Topics will include the development of ships and shipbuilding techniques, the role of ships in exploration and trade, and (to paraphrase A. T. Mahan) the influence of sea power in shaping the world we know today.

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HIST 415Topics: American HistoryThe History of the Civil Rights Movement1HoldenThis is a reading, research, and writing-intensive seminar on the history of the African American freedom struggle. Chronologically this course concentrates on the period of time starting with the rise of disfranchisement and segregation in the late 1800s and moving through the Black Power movement of the late 1960s and 1970s. Through a series of secondary source readings we will track the various challenges the African American community has encountered over the years and the strategies used to overcome. Students will also use primary sources to write a research paper on some aspect of the civil rights movement.

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HIST 435Topics: European HistoryLaw and Society in the Ancient World1Hall, L This course will analyze and compare the concepts of justice and equity that underlay the legal systems of ancient Mesopotamia, Greece, and Rome. The intersections of responsibility and right conduct between superior and inferior or between equals will be of particular interest. The relations between master and slave, between husband and wife, and between buyer and seller offered the potential for conflict among interested parties. The ancient legal arrangements, as set forth in both the ancient legal texts and recorded trials (particularly murder cases), reveal shifting paradigms of right and wrong behavior and shed light on current interpretations of justice and equity.

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HIST 435Topics: European HistoryHitler's Germany: From Unification to the Fall of the Third Reich (1871-1945)2AdamsNo country has played a more crucial role that Germany in the events of the twentieth century. This course will examine some of the key debates in the history and historiogeaphy of Germany from the time of its unification in 1871 ti the fall of the Third Reich in 1945. How did the circumstances of Germany's unification under Bismarck contribute to its political developments? What role did World War I play in shaping Germany's path in the twentieth century? What was both the long-term and immediate context that contributed to the rise of Adolf Hitler and the catastrophe of the Second World War?j How did the vexed questions of the German nation, the German state, and German citizenship -- who is included and who is excluded--fit into these developments?

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HIST 475Topics: Comparative, Thematic, GlobalMass Culture and the Creation of the Modern1BarrettThis class will explore the myriad ways in which mass culture helped shape modern sensibilities and attitudes in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Nationalism, imperialism, socialism, democracy, consumerism, and modern sexual, ethnic, and class identities were all constituted, in part, through mass culture. Mass culture also created new perceptions of reality, informed by the spectacular, sensational, and vernacular. We will investigate how this happened, using various forms of entertainment and media, including popular drama, wild west shows, baseball, posters, cinema, mail order catalog, and the comic strip.

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MUSC 321Special Topics in Music HistoryMusic and Art1Sterling This course will examine the relationship between music and the visual arts from three fundamental perspectives. Firstly, it will study the ways in which music has been influenced by art (e.g. Mussorgsky’s piano piece Pictures at an Exhibition) or has invoked a visual quality (e.g. the association between sounds and colors in the minds of certain composers). Secondly, it will investigate the manner in which art has responded to music (e.g. the iconography of composers, instruments and performances) or has deliberately aimed for a “musical” quality (e.g. abstract art, such as that of Kandinsky). Finally, it will consider some of the means by which music and art have worked together, from illuminated manuscripts to opera scenery to album covers. There are no prerequisites for this course.

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PHIL 352South Asian Philosophies and Religions1SchroederAn intensive and extensive study of the history, beliefs, and practices of Hinduism, Indian Buddhism, and Jainism as reflected in their canonical texts, with special reference to the Vedic scriptures, Upanishads, Bhagavad-Gita, and early Buddhist sutras. The interplay between philosophical and theological concerns will be studied and the contemporary relevance of the tradition will be examined. Cross-listed as PHIL 352. Students may receive credit for either course, but not both. Prerequisite: one course in RELG or PHIL.

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PHIL 380Philosophical TopicsPhilosophy and Race1EmerickIn this course we will explore a number of important philosophical issues having to do with race and the role it plays both in people's lives and in society. The course will be divided into three sections, the first of which takes on the difficult task of exploring what race is and whether “race talk” is justified or useful. Next, we will analyze racism and racial oppression, parsing out the different levels on which racism operates, and seeking to better understand how it does so. Finally, we will apply our conclusions from the first two sections to various issues that one frequently encounters in the contemporary United States, including affirmative action, racial integration, racial/racist humor, incarceration, cultural appropriation, and reparation for historical and contemporary wrongs.

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PHIL 382Meditation and the Mind1ParkThis course will explore the practice of meditation, with special attention being paid to its effects on cognition, affectivity, neurobiology, etc., and what these changes ultimately tell us about the mind. We will investigate meditation from the standpoints of first-hand practice, classical Asian and East Asian religion-philosophical texts, phenomenology, and via relevant contemporary empirical research in the brain sciences. Topics will include: focused awareness vs. open presence vs. affective meditational approaches; the cognitive, emotional, moral, and existential effects of meditative experience; contemplative education; the use of meditation in prison, and the metaphysical issues associate with questions of consciousness. Each seminar meeting will begin with a 20-30 min. meditation practice, for which a meditation pillow, or zafu, is required. Pre-requisite: one course in philosophy or consent of instructor.

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POSC 342The Supreme Court & Discrimination1Hall, MExperimental course: This course will entail the study of the Supreme Court cases involving racial, ethnic, gender, religious, weath, age, sexual orientation, disabilities, and legitimacy of birth discrimination in education, employment opportunities, housing, public accommodations, and voting. We will also study the growth of the Court's application of the Fourteenth Amendment, and how the Court has assessed remedies for discrimination, including affirmative action in secondary education and public contracting, school redistricting, and the composition of legislative districts.

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POSC 385Topics in Political Science of Public PolicyComparative Electoral System1UguesElections and electoral systems are the central and defining feature of modern democracy. In this regard, electoral systems provide a critical link in translating the preferences of citizens to governments. As such, it is important to understand the significant role that electoral systems play in modern democratic regimes. This course introduces students to some of the major theoretical and conceptual building blocks concerning electoral systems such as system types, system change, and the effects of these systems. In so doing, the course provides an overview of electoral systems around the world, but also evaluates how electoral systems influence party systems, representation, citizen attitudes and behavior, the quality of democracy, and electoral integrity.

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POSC 385Topics in Political Science of Public PolicyWelfare State Regimes2CarterThis course is an introduction to the study of welfare state regimes. It uses a comparative approach to examine diferences in the strcture of welfare states throghout the world. We will explore the mpicatio of different welfare regimes for public goods provision, political and economic inequality, and inter-group relations.

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POSC461Studies in American PoliticsUS Election Law and Policy 1GroganElections and electoral systems are the central and defining feature of modern democracy. In this regard, electoral systems provide a critical link in translating the preferences of citiThis course introduces students to some of the major theoretical and conceptual building blocks concerning electoral systems such as system types, system change, and the effects of these systems. In so doing, the course provides an overview of electoral systems around the world, but also evaluates how electoral systems influence party systems, representation, citizen attitudes and behavior, the quality of democracy, and electoral integrity. zens to governments. As such, it is important to understand the significant role that electoral systems play in modern democratic regimes.

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POSC462Studies in Comparative PoliticsNationalism1ShafqatRarely a day goes by without some report of ethnic conflict somewhere in the world. In fact, by some accounts ethnic conflict is the most widespread problem confronting us today. In this class, we will study this phenomenon. We will attempt to understand ethnic conflict, and eventually our aim will be to try and develop creative ways to manage ethnic conflict. An understanding of ethnic conflict necessitates that we acquaint ourselves with some basic terms and concepts, especially the central concept of "ethnicity." Therefore, we will first study the definition of ethnicity, and other major terms. Then, we will examine a specific case of ethnic conflict, in Rwanda, and to a more limited extent other cases. Next, we will turn to theories of ethnic tension and conflict, and will examine the international dimensions of ethnic conflict. Finally, we will turn to ways in which ethnic conflict can be managed and resolved.

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RELG 211Speaking of God: Introduction to Theology1BeallIntroduces students to major twentieth-century theological and religious thinkers as they wrestle with some or all of the following questions: Who or what is God? Why do good people suffer? How are salvation, redemption, and liberation envisioned in the modern world? What constitutes a religious community? How do different religious faiths relate to each other, the secular world, and the natural environment? This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Humanistic Foundations.

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RELG 328Topics in Religion and PsychologyPsychoanalysis and Religion1MeckelA close and critical examination of the major psychoanalytic approaches to religion. Beginning with Sigmund Freud and developing in radically new directions, these approaches view religious life as deeply embedded in unconscious desires, anxieties, hatreds, love, attachments, and fantasies. Students will explore and evaluate these views. Introductions to a range of psychoanalytic perspectives will be interlaced with studies of ritual and worship, notions of God(s), mystical experience, sacred symbolism, art and mythology. The course is writing-intensive and uses film, fiction, psychiatric case studies, religious biography, dream-analysis, and self-exploration.

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RELG 352South Asian Philosophies and Religions1SchroederAn intensive and extensive study of the history, beliefs, and practices of Hinduism, Indian Buddhism, and Jainism as reflected in their canonical texts, with special reference to the Vedic scriptures, Upanishads, Bhagavad-Gita, and early Buddhist sutras. The interplay between philosophical and theological concerns will be studied and the contemporary relevance of the tradition will be examined. Cross-listed as PHIL 352. Students may receive credit for either course, but not both. Prerequisite: one course in RELG or PHIL.

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TFMS 390 Production Context SeminarCrossroads: Writing/Performing the Self(ie)1TaylorThis course is designed for students with a strong interest in self-definition, self-expression, diversity, and building community through communication. Creative exercises in genres from poetry, to memoir, to essay, to stand-up, to tweets will be utilized in order to explore critical issues, and develop and refine a unique, theatrical statement of self and world view. Physical theater exercises will enhance communication skills and the ability to articulate ideas and share them more powerfully. The end product of this course will be public performance of an original, collaboratively-developed theater piece that weaves together monologues and group work reflecting the diversity of student perspectives and experience at St. Mary’s College and beyond. The production will be produced during the semester as part of the TFMS department main stage season and students will be expected to participate.

Prior performance experience is not required. A willingness to explore your own unique background and perspectives in respectful collaboration with others is a requirement. Students should be interested in exploring and expanding their knowledge of urgent topical issues in the areas of race, gender, and the environment. The success of the course will be greatly aided by a highly diverse class enrollment.This course is cross-listed in AADS and may be taken for 2-4 credits

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TFMS 425Advanced Topics in Film and MediaTeen Films: Coming of Age in American Cinema1D. EllsworthThis course will examine the concept of film genre in relation to how Hollywood has portrayed “coming of age” in films from the mid 1950s through today. How have the story lines, character types, and tropes evolved in “teen films” over time? How does this evolution relate to the cultural and historical circumstances in which these films were made and viewed? The course will also examine and discuss the distinctive formal elements that are manifest in these films as well as the historical, cultural, and economic context in which each was produced and received by its audience. One of the primary goals of this course is to help enrich the ways students view and critically respond to film form. This course may be used to satisfy an elective requirement of the English major, under the terms stipulated in the English department’s section of the catalog. Prerequisite: TFMS 220, 221, or consent of the instructor.

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BIOL380.01Topics in BiologyPopulation GeneticsK. EmersonPopulation genetics is a branch of evolutionary biology concerned with the genetic structure of populations and how it changes through time in response to evolutionary forces (e.g., selection, mutation, migration, and drift). Population genetics is an abstraction of the evolutionary process and involves a fair amount of mathematics - primarily algebra, probability theory, and calculus. This course will focus on the theoretical basis of population genetics combined with empirical case studies representing applications of evolutionary genetics. A mathematical background including Calculus is recommended though not required. Prerequisites: Biol271 and Biol271L.

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COSC480.01A. JamiesonIntro to GPU programming is a topics course focusing on programming that targets graphics processing units (GPUs) for general computational tasks, rather than rendering. GPUs are well suited for massively parallel projects and are increasingly being used as the backbone of the powerful clusters that power applications such as financial modeling, weather forecasting, and physics and mathematical simulations. In this course, students will be exposed to programming techniques and fundamentals of GPUs as they are applied to parallel and distributed computing and the course should be treated as an extension of COSC 420. No previous experience with parallel and distributed programming is required, though it would help. Strongly recommended: COSC 251, Recommended: COSC 420, Required: COSC 201.

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