Thomson's Basic Writing Suggestions

So you don't have to plagiarize

The steps
These all SAVE time and make a better product.

  • Read the assignment and rubrics
  • Read the TEXT for the class
  • Re-Read the assignment and organize
  • Write a thesis
  • Write an outline
  • Find at least one quote in the text for every body paragraph in the out line

The Basic Outline

Paragraphs...

  • Intro
    • hook
    • background
    • thesis
  • Support the thesis
    • sandwich
  • State the other side of the thesis
  • Make connections
  • Conclude
    • state the significance
    • restate the thesis
    • "A call to action"

The Thesis

Answer the question

Take a position

Map out the paper

Other Suggestions

  • Don't begin or end a paragraph with a quote.
  • Start with thesis and an outline before you write (time saver)
  • Read and research for 1 to 2 hours
  • Find your quotes and fit them into the outline before you start to write.
  • Don't use "I" unless it is assigned in first person.
  • Don't say, "this paper will talk about."
  • Make your thesis a clear statement

Sandwich Paragraphs

Each body paragraph should use this formula...

  • Make a transition from previous paragraph
  • Make a statement that connects the thesis to the quote that comes next.
  • Set up a quote with prior attribution
  • Quote a source
  • Restate the quote in your own words
  • Connect the paragraph to the thesis

The Common-law of a “Clear and Present Danger”

George A. Thomson

POL 571

Professor Todd

December 3, 1999

Paragraph 4

The First Amendment has a paradox. The liberty of free speech existed before government’s authority and must be respected by it. On the other had free speech is often contrary to a government’s existence; speech then, is often restrained. As Alexander Meiklejohn said in 1965, “[T]he First Amendment ... does not forbid the abridging of speech. But, at the same time, it does forbid the abridging of the freedom of speech. It is to the solving of that paradox, that apparent self-contradiction, that we are summoned if, as free men, we wish to know what the right of freedom of speech is.” (at Hamburger 1). This paradox of the First Amendment is most frequently solved through the Court balancing each case of government need and common-law.

1. The First Amendment has a paradox. (transition)

2. The liberty of free speech existed before government’s authority and must be respected by it. On the other had free speech is often contrary to a government’s existence; speech then, is often restrained. (Statement that connects to the thesis)

3. As Alexander Meiklejohn said in 1965,

4.“[T]he First Amendment ... does not forbid the abridging of speech. But, at the same time, it does forbid the abridging of the freedom of speech. It is to the solving of that paradox, that apparent self-contradiction, that we are summoned if, as free men, we wish to know what the right of freedom of speech is.” (at Hamburger 1).

5. and 6 This paradox of the First Amendment is most frequently solved through the Court balancing each case of government need and common-law.

Social Movements and Trends

The steps
These all SAVE time and make a better product.

  • Read the assignment and rubrics
  • Read the TEXT for the class
    Ch30
  • Re-Read the assignment and organize
  • Write a thesis
  • Write an outline
  • Find at least one quote in the text for every body paragraph in the out line
  • Search for news paper articles of the time

Choose one of the following topics:

· Native Americans

· Women

· Environment

· Latin Americans

· Sexual liberation

Read at least 3 different newspaper articles between 1968 and 1980 that cover important changes affecting your topic. Use the ProQuest Historical Newspaper archive, which includes the following major newspapers, among others:

· New York Times

· Washington Post

· Wall Street Journal

· Los Angeles Times

· Christian Science Monitor

Write a 700- to 1,050-word paper in which you 1. describe the status of one of the chosen group or idea and 2. how that group or idea was affected by the changes brought about during the 1960s. Include information gleaned from the newspaper articles as well as other material.

Format your paper consistent with APA guidelines.

Steps-Civil Rights Diary

  • Read the assignment and rubrics
  • Read the TEXT for the class
    Ch29
  • Re-Read the assignment and organize
  • Write a thesis
  • Write an outline
  • Find at least in the text or Internet for every body paragraph in the outline.

Selma 1965 Original source docs

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1lUFe2hDw8BPcJLXSzVM2hWq0PcRExKhPzLX8gYbcgi4/edit

Academic Historical Position Paper Writing

  • First decide if the paper is an essay of a series of answers.

  • If a series of answers is used do this:
    • Restate the question in the answer
    • Include and overall intro to the list of questions with a thesis.
  • Use third person

  • Take a position
  • State the other side of the position

Writing Academic Historical Position Papers

  • Sandwich Paragraphs

  • Always use original source documents.
  • Cite something in every response

  • Connect, connect, connect.

  • Note: it’s not required you follow this system, but it is the accepted system. I’ll be grading on the rubrics and content above all.

Sources

  • National Archives

  • Interactive Constitution

  • The Founders' Constitution

  • The Federalist Papers

  • Famous American Trials

  • A Chronology of U.S. Historical Documents

  • AZ Constitution
Thomson's Basic Writing Suggestions - Google Slides