Enhanced

by Design

creating user-informed, aesthetically attractive

projects for your library

[Ronnie]

Veronica

Arellano Douglas

Research & Instruction Librarian

St. Mary’s College

of Maryland

viarellano@smcm.edu

Dan

Vinson

Coordinator of User Services & Library Assessment

Mount Mary University

vinsond@mtmary.edu

Amanda VerMeulen

Research & Instruction Librarian

St. Mary’s College

of Maryland

aavermeulen@smcm.edu

The Library Collective 2017 Knoxville, TN libguides.smcm.edu/design2017

Who are we?

[Individual introductions]

[Briefly talk about our non-formal training/background in our areas of “expertise”]

NOT

what this session is

[Dan]

NOT

what this session is

deep graphic design theory

how to analyze user data

beginning coding

intro stats

[Dan]

NOT

what this session is

(SORRY)

deep graphic design theory

how to analyze user data

beginning coding

intro stats

[Dan]

USER RESEARCH METHODS

BASIC AESTHETICS

DESIGN DECISION-MAKING

[Amanda]

We will be sharing a lot of info with you today but we're also keeping the session participatory and active with plenty of learning activities interspersed between us talking. If you have questions at any point feel free to ask them. We're here for you!

What is a problem you want

to solve in your library?

What is a big picture question you have about your library?

[Ronnie introduce activity] [Dan facilitate reporting-out]

Brainstorming Questions / Ideas (Think-Group-Share Activity) [10 minutes: 3-4-3]

Ask participants to think about the following:

Give them 3 minutes to brainstorm individually on a notecard, then ask them to share with their small group and write questions/problems on the flipchart. If participants in a group have duplicate questions/problems, put a checkmark next to it.

Then do a rapid-fire report-out. Each group has to share 1 or 2 questions/problems and they can’t duplicate the group who spoke before. The point is just to share what everyone is dealing with, determine overlap, unique problems, themes, etc.

  • Answer question(s) on notecard.

What is a problem you want to solve in your library?

What big picture question do you have about your library?

2. Share with group.

3. Write group Qs on flipchart.
Put a checkmark next to dupes.

Instructions

STOP

time to share

USER

what is

RESEARCH?

[Amanda]

What is user research?

ASSESSMENT

USER EXPERIENCE

USER RESEARCH

[Amanda]

LIS Ecosystem

(a very small assortment)

METHODS

[Amanda]

Methods (a sample platter)

QUALITATIVE

interviews

focus groups

design workshops

usability testing

ethnography

[Amanda]

Qualitative

QUANTITATIVE

surveys

analytics data

card sorts

a/b testing

usage stats

[Amanda]

Quantitative

ANTHROPOLOGY

ETHNOGRAPHY

ASSESSMENT

USER

EXPERIENCE

USER

RESEARCH

LIS

[Amanda]

Quick PSA: the difference between “ethnography” in user research and in anthropology

how do you

CHOOSE?

[Amanda]

How to decide what user research method to use based on problem/question?

match methods

with questions

[Amanda]

Pair your sources with area of inquiry (methods)

what kind of

QUESTION

is your question?

[Amanda]

What kind of question is your question? (adapted from Leah Buley “The Right Research Method for Any Problem (and Budget)” User Research for Everyone)

Context

User Needs

Problem solving product & Does it work?

where are you?

[Amanda]

What is our context, what is happening in the world around us? (adapted from Leah Buley “The Right Research Method for Any Problem (and Budget)” User Research for Everyone)

Context

what do they

need?

[Amanda]

What do the people that we serve need? (adapted from Leah Buley “The Right Research Method for Any Problem (and Budget)” User Research for Everyone)

User Needs

QD

does it work?

how can we help?

[Amanda]

What can we make/do that will help? And Does our solution really work? (adapted from Leah Buley “The Right Research Method for Any Problem (and Budget)” User Research for Everyone)

[Amanda]

Methods you choose will depend on

(Erica Hall “Just Enough Research” URFE)

Think about how the method can help you answer the question before you begin your research

KNOWN

ISSUES

UNKNOWN

ISSUES

Known/unknown issues - a different way to think about it [Amanda]

KNOWN

ISSUES

[Dan 1-2 minutes]

Known Issues (Mount Mary) - targeted surveys each semester

3-survey cycle included library spaces, online resources, and service interactions, all with room for free comments. From the answers and comments each time we identified quick, low-cost/free things we could improve right away, as well as farther out. More computers>laptops + wayfinding>directional signs, call number signs, collection map. Some involved campus partnerships, such as with IT. Assessment needs action. All surveys contained 10 questions and were offered via SurveyMonkey.

UNKNOWN

ISSUES

[Ronnie 1-2 minutes]

Unknown Issues (SMCM)

METHODS

questions

[Amanda introduce activity] [3 of us will circulate, facilitate, and keep on time]

Match User Research Methods to Brainstorming Questions (Activity) [10 min]

In small groups again, participants will use the user method chart (handout or slide display) to match questions to methods. Each group will get a stack of post-its and markers. They’ll write down a method on a post it note, and stick it next to the question on the flip chart.

Peer-critique: Two groups will work together to share feedback with one another. Discussion prompts:

Large group check-in? Address the second question (one example from each group).

METHODS

questions

  • Write down method on post-it note.
  • Stick it next to question on flip chart.
  • Discuss:

Which pairing are you most unsure about?

Is there a Q that doesn’t seem well-suited to a method mentioned?

[Amanda introduce activity] [3 of us will circulate, facilitate, and keep on time]

Match User Research Methods to Brainstorming Questions (Activity) [10 min]

In small groups again, participants will use the user method chart (handout or slide display) to match questions to methods. Each group will get a stack of post-its and markers. They’ll write down a method on a post it note, and stick it next to the question on the flip chart.

Peer-critique: Two groups will work together to share feedback with one another. Discussion prompts:

Large group check-in? Address the second question (one example from each group).

beep boop bop boop beep bop beep bop boop boop beep beep boop bop boop beep bop beep bop boop boop beep beep boop bop boop beep bop beep bop boop boop beep beep boop bop boop beep bop beep bop boop boop beep beep boop bop boop beep bop beep bop boop boop beep beep boop bop boop beep bop beep bop beep bop boop boop beep beep boop bop boop beep bop beep bop boop boop beep beep boop bop boop beeep

DATA YOU

CAN USE !

[Ronnie]

Intermission / Cookin’ [1 min]

Mention analyzing your data and reaching conclusions. Acknowledge that it is critical work, but that for the purposes of this presentation it’s the equivalent of off-stage cake baking. YOU NOW HAVE ACTIONABLE DATA.

libguide * digital signage * poster * buttons handout * infographic * notecards * display

???????????

[Dan]

Brainstorm Visual Product Options [6 slides, 5 min]

Brief Talk: How to decide what visual product to create>>LibGuides vs. handouts: I started in LibGuides, but it ended up being more intricate than necessary. I kept returning to survey comments to inform outcomes. I also referred to Web design articles and books as well as Librarian Design Share for inspiration. Eventually I settled on a Canva design that allowed me to include the relevant tools students were confused about, all while keeping it simple. Minimalism won! These handouts ended up on our home page as direct links to PDFs, on paper in our Learning Commons, and are often forwarded to faculty members after library instruction sessions. [Dan, talking about images and decision-making process]

DATA

libguide

flyers

[Dan]

Brainstorm Visual Product Options, ctd. [5 min]

Brief Talk: How to decide what visual product to create [Dan, talking about images and decision-making process]

[Dan]

Handouts as slides

Audience Matters

[Dan]

For different users/stakeholder

You have to think about how design decisions affect:

Anecdote about infographic vs. exec summary

READ ME

READ ME

READ ME

READ ME

Briefly

This became...

...this

Design

Best Practices

[Ronnie]

General Best Practices in Design / Brief Visual Aesthetics [5-8 min]

Not an in-depth discussion of aesthetic theory, but a few considerations that will help make any design better. I’ll be using examples of the visual products that were a result of our ethnography project at St. Mary’s.

Consistency

is Key.

Decide on fonts and color palette and stick to it.

Using the same fonts for signage, so that it becomes synonymous with the library’s brand, and is a signal to users.

Colors are also a signal:

Continued repetition of icon use in all our signage and publications. Simple lines and circle icons.

Readability is important. Consider testing your font and color choices on different people and gathering feedback.

CONTRAST

CONTRAST

PROXIMITY

PROXIMITY:

PROXIMITY

PROXIMITY:

PROXIMITY

PROXIMITY:

ALIGNMENT

ALIGNMENT

ALIGNMENT

ALIGNMENT

ALIGNMENT

ALIGNMENT

REPETITION

REPETITION simply means the reuse of the same or similar elements throughout your design. These can be colors, shapes, textures, spatial relationships, line thicknesses, fonts - repeating any of these in a design will bring a clear sense of unity, consistency, and cohesiveness. It gives the mind a pattern to follow.

Where contrast is about showing differences, and alignment is about obtaining unity among the placement of elements, repetition is about subtly using elements to make sure the design is viewed as being part of a larger whole.

SCALE

SCALE

Gallery

Walk

[Ronnie]

Group Critique of Submitted Examples

We have X minutes left together, and during that the remainder of our session we want to give you an opportunity to offer feedback to current visual designs in progress from other participants and colleagues at other libraries. There are X designs up on the walls right now. Using some of the design best practices I just mentioned, and the design-decision-making considerations Dan discussed, make suggestions and offer feedback on the designs using the post-it pads on your table. Add your feedback next to the appropriate design.

Be kind.

Offer feedback you would

find useful.

[Ronnie]

Group Critique of Submitted Examples

We have X minutes left together, and during that the remainder of our session we want to give you an opportunity to offer feedback to current visual designs in progress from other participants and colleagues at other libraries. There are X designs up on the walls right now. Using some of the design best practices I just mentioned, and the design-decision-making considerations Dan discussed, make suggestions and offer feedback on the designs using the post-it pads on your table. Add your feedback next to the appropriate design.

Select Resources

UX/UR

Bridinel, C. (2017, January 12). Get the Most Out of User Research – UX Planet. Retrieved January 17, 2017, from https://uxplanet.org/get-the-most-out-of-user-research-9b2af0b7edb3

Krug, S. et al. (2014). Don't Make Me Think, Revisited: a Common Sense Approach to Web Usability. San Francisco: New Riders.

McArthur, J. A., & Graham, V. J. (2015). User-Experience Design and Library Spaces: A Pathway to Innovation? Journal of Library Innovation. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/article/view/316

Nielsen, J., & Norman, D. (2014). The definition of user experience. Nielsen Norman Group. Retrieved from https://www.nngroup.com/articles/definition-user-experience/

Schmidt, A., & Etches, A. (2014). Useful, Usable, Desirable: Applying User Experience Design to Your Library. Chicago: American Library Association.

Design - Assessment

Dando, P. (2014). Say It with Data: A Concise Guide to Making Your Case and Getting Results. Chicago: ALA Editions.

Duke, L. and Asher, A. (2011). College Libraries and Student Culture : What We Now Know. Chicago: ALA Editions.

Head, A. and Eisenberg, M. (2010). Assigning Inquiry: How Handouts for Research Assignments Guide Today’s College Students. Project Information Literacy Progress Report.

Resources Slide

Select Resources

Matthews, J. (2007a). Library Assessment in Higher Education. Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited.

Matthews, J. (2007b). The Evaluation and Measurement of Library Services. Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited.

Etc.

Dowd, et al. (2010). Bite-Sized Marketing: Realistic Solutions for the Overworked Librarian. Chicago: ALA Editions.

Head, A. (2013). Learning the Ropes: How Freshmen Conduct Course Research Once They Enter College. Project Information Literacy Passage Studies Research Report.

Design - Aesthetics

Kurt, L. (2012a, May 23). Design 101: Design Elements, Part 1. Retrieved from http://acrl.ala.org/techconnect/?p=1067

Kurt, L. (2012b, July 6). Design 101: Design Elements, Part 2, Typography. Retrieved from http://acrl.ala.org/techconnect/?p=1251

Lidwell, W., Holden, K., & Butler, J. (2003). Universal Principles of Design. Gloucester, MA: Rockport Publishers.

Lupton, E., & Phillips, J. C. (2015). Graphic Design: The New Basics: Second Edition, Revised and Expanded. New York, NY: Princeton Architectural Press.

Williams, R. (2014). The Non-Designer’s Design Book, 4th edition. San Francisco, CA: Peachpit Press.

Resources Slide

Icon Credits

from The Noun Project

Created by Zhuxiang Huang

Created by Zhuxiang Huang

Created by iconsmind.com

Created by

Chris Homan

Created by

Jake Schirmer

Icon credits

The Collective 2017 Slides - Google Slides