Critical Literacy

Making Connections, Questioning, Wondering, Thinking, Reflecting

Ideas 2A/3B, elaborating on my ideas mostly but all

Organisation - paragraphs

Purpose and Audience - voice

Sentence structure - simple, compound, complex etc

Make Meaning: What is Critical Literacy?

Consider this example:

Look what we found on the internet! The News says aliens are real!

Talk with a buddy:

  • Do you believe this headline? Why/why not?

Chances are, you are being critical about what you are reading.

  • What does being critical mean?

  • Why should we be critical with what we read, hear or watch?

Reading is thinking!

Critical literacy involves:

  • challenging the text

  • exploring point of view

  • seeing beyond bias

Consider the word bias:

Let’s define it!

Bias is when you compare things and choose which one is better than other. Judging things from your point of view, when you don’t have ALL the facts. It’s not fair.

Unbiased is when you get all the facts from different sources - eg. other people, experts, the internet, library resources and books. It is fair; need both sides of the story.

Make Meaning

Here are some questions we might consider when we look at a text critically:

story?

The True Story of the Three Little Pigs

Bring What I Know:

Discuss what you already know about the Three Little Pigs before reading.

Build knowledge during reading:

Now use the graphic organiser to write the main events of the story.

Think:

  • How come we never see why the wolf came to visit the 3 pigs?
  • What might the wolf say if he was telling the story?
  • Do you think this is a fair representation of the facts?
  • Do you think this story has a bias?

The True Story of the Three Little Pigs

Watch the True Story of the Three Little Pigs.

Use your graphic organiser to compare and contrast the events as told by Mr. A. Wolf.

Opportunity for Role Play in buddies - one be the first pig, the other be the wolf etc.

Thursday 19th October

Book Review: The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka

Hub 7 mini lesson

Hub 7 mini lesson review: Tuesday 24th October.

Last week we discussed how to review a book. We wrote a book review too!

Are you stuck when it comes to doing it independently?

Revise how to write a book review by using these slides.

Evidence Upload ALERT!

Do not proceed until you have uploaded a photo of your graphic organiser to SchoolTalk.

This is great evidence folks!

The True Story of the Three Little Pigs

The True Story of the Three Little Pigs

Watch the True Story of the Three Little Pigs.

Use your graphic organiser to compare and contrast the events as told by Mr. A. Wolf.

Opportunity for Role Play in buddies - one be the first pig, the other be the wolf etc.

Drama: Role play

Think about the different characters and how they act. What are they thinking?

Warm up: Mr Chop’s Sweet shop

Hero

  • Brave
  • Intelligent
  • Fights for justice
  • Looks for a problem to solve
  • Comes to the rescue
  • High self-esteem

Movement: Good centre of gravity, strong limbs and stances. Athletic and can be loud.

WALT: explore points of view

I built my house out of bricks! What a marvellous fortress. I will protect my brothers!

Innocent

  • Gullible
  • Loyal
  • Happy
  • People pleaser
  • Gives everyone the benefit of the doubt

Movement: A high energy character, high centre of gravity, very excitable

WALT: explore points of view

A house of sticks! What a fine idea! I will have tea and cake every day and all my friends can come to visit… what fun we will have!

Idiot

  • Completely gullible
  • Slow thinker
  • Not intelligent
  • Doesn’t get jokes

Movement: A low energy character, takes a long time to do anything, low centre of gravity, does what is told.

WALT: explore points of view

How clever I am! Straw is free! A house of straw for me!

Sage

  • Cares for others
  • Intelligent
  • Wise and thoughtful
  • Sense of duty
  • Gives everyone the benefit of the doubt
  • Courageous

Movement: Deliberate movements, sometimes slow. Confident.

WALT: explore points of view

What a dreadful misunderstanding…

Remember we used a graphic organiser to compare and contrast the two stories.

Apply understanding

What is your response to the different versions of the story if the 3 little pigs?

Justify your thinking by using evidence from the text to support your answer.

You need to craft at least 2 paragraphs in your writing book responding to these texts. Use your notes on the graphic organiser to help you.

Need help? Try and collect your thoughts using screencastify.

Handy Hints: The first paragraph could be about how plausible the story of the 3 Little Pigs is as told from their point of view. Do you agree this is the whole truth? Why? Why not?

The second paragraph could be about the differences from the Wolf’s point of view. What is your overall verdict - which version do you believe? Which story is the most fair and unbiased?

T to model 1st para to target group; T to model 1st para to rest of chn;

Eileen to work with V group to summarise main differences,

Evidence Upload ALERT!

Do not proceed until you have uploaded a photo of your writing to Schooltalk.

Make good choices kids!

Let’s be critical: Fractured Fairy Tales

Week 2

Angela, Alan to rewrite the trailer in their own words with Eileen

Imagine that you are the detective investigating the crime on a given fairy tale. Your job is to interview the first little pig. Etc. Lots of Role play. What questions could you ask him?

Look at the story LRRH. What is going on inside the wolf’s head? 10th kingdom clip from 39:22-40:18 Role play the wolf from LRRH.

Build Knowledge

Bring what you know:

What fairy tales do you know? Whose voice is it?

Use the graphic organiser to consider other fairy tales and in what way they are biased.

Think about J and the Beanstalk - the giant is up there minding his own business etc…

Make Meaning

Think about what you might consider in your graphic organiser. Here are some questions to help you look at a text critically:

story?

Make Meaning

Let’s think about Red Riding Hood.

Who is telling the story? What don’t we know?

What questions do you have?

Make Meaning

Ever considered this?

Make Meaning

Ever considered these scenarios?

Watch the clips below - What questions might you have now?

Wolf 39:24

HWtrailer

Make Meaning

Ever considered these scenarios?

WALHT: Write a persuasive letter

Consider what formal language we can use:

Date, Address

Dear Detective Inspector ……

Intro: I am writing to you because….

Time connectives:

  • Firstly,
  • Secondly
  • Thirdly/Lastly/Finally

Phrases:

  • You may be unaware that….
  • Let me explain….
  • You may find it useful to know….
  • I am extremely frustrated that….
  • I am outraged/furious that….
  • Being in a cold, dark, damp, confined cell is making me….

Yours Sincerely….

Where is your evidence to keep me in captivity?

Why does everybody blame wolves?

How can you live with yourself?

How could you blame an innocent wolf?

Wolf 39:24

HWtrailer

Apply understanding

As a wolf, what is your response to the police accusation that you ate granny?

Justify your innocence to the police.

You need to craft at least 2 paragraphs in your writing book of a persuasive letter to the detective in charge.

Need help? Try and collect your thoughts using screencastify.

Handy Hints: Look back at the sentence starters to help you!

Let’s be critical: Fractured Fairy Tales

Week 4

Angela, Alan to rewrite the trailer in their own words with Eileen

Imagine that you are the detective investigating the crime on a given fairy tale. Your job is to interview the first little pig. Etc. Lots of Role play. What questions could you ask him?

Look at the story LRRH. What is going on inside the wolf’s head? 10th kingdom clip from 39:22-40:18 Role play the wolf from LRRH.

Build Knowledge

Bring what you know about the tale of Jack & the Beanstalk.

Predict whose perspective this story will be from.

Think about J and the Beanstalk - the giant is up there minding his own business etc…

Make Meaning

Let’s think about Jack and the Beanstalk.

Who is telling the story? What don’t we know?

What questions do you have?

Make Meaning

Think about what you might consider in your graphic organiser. Here are some questions to help you look at a text critically:

story?

Make Meaning

Ever considered this scenario?

Watch the clip below - What questions might you have now?

Wolf 39:24

HWtrailer

Make Meaning

Ever considered these scenarios?

WALHT: Write a persuasive letter

Consider what formal language we can use:

Date, Address

Dear Mayor Johnson,

Intro: I am writing to you because….

Time connectives:

  • Firstly,
  • Secondly
  • Thirdly/Lastly/Finally

Phrases:

  • You may be unaware that….
  • Let me explain….
  • You may find it useful to know….
  • I am extremely frustrated that….
  • I am outraged/furious that….

Yours Sincerely….

Rhetorical questions...

Wolf 39:24

HWtrailer

Apply understanding

As the giant, what is your response to the Jack’s accusation that you are the big bad giant?

Justify your innocence to the village people.

You need to craft at least 2 paragraphs in your writing book of a persuasive letter to the detective in charge.

Need help? Try and collect your thoughts using screencastify.

Handy Hints: Look back at the sentence starters to help you!

Let’s be critical: Fractured Fairy Tales

Week 8

Angela, Alan to rewrite the trailer in their own words with Eileen

Imagine that you are the detective investigating the crime on a given fairy tale. Your job is to interview the first little pig. Etc. Lots of Role play. What questions could you ask him?

Look at the story LRRH. What is going on inside the wolf’s head? 10th kingdom clip from 39:22-40:18 Role play the wolf from LRRH.

Make Meaning: What is Critical Literacy?

Consider this example:

Look what we found on the internet! The News says that we can be brought back to life after we die!

Talk with a buddy:

  • Do you believe this headline? Why/why not?

Chances are, you are being critical about what you are reading.

  • What does being critical mean?

  • Why should we be critical with what we read, hear or watch?

Reading is thinking!

Critical literacy involves:

  • challenging the text

  • exploring point of view

  • seeing beyond bias

Consider the word bias: Let’s define it!

Bias is... not fair, because you’re only looking at it from one point of view, which is not fair to another person’s point of view. I don’t have all of the facts

Unbiased is… being fair, exploring all of the points of view and getting all of the facts.

Make Meaning

Here are some questions we might consider when we look at a text critically:

story?

Build Knowledge

Bring what you know about the tale of Cinderella.

Predict whose perspective this story will be from.

Make Meaning

Let’s think about Cinderella.

Who is telling the story? What don’t we know?

What questions do you have?

Make Meaning

Think about what you might consider in your graphic organiser. Here are some questions to help you look at a text critically:

story?

Make Meaning

Ever considered this scenario?

Watch the clip below - What questions might you have now?

Wolf 39:24

HWtrailer

Make Meaning

Ever considered this scenario?

WALHT: Write a persuasive letter

Consider what formal language we can use:

Date, Address

Dear Mayor Johnson,

Intro: I am writing to you because….

Time connectives:

  • Firstly,
  • Secondly
  • Thirdly/Lastly/Finally

Phrases:

  • You may be unaware that….
  • Let me explain….
  • You may find it useful to know….
  • I am extremely frustrated that….
  • I am outraged/furious that….

Yours Sincerely….

Wolf 39:24

HWtrailer

Apply understanding

As the step-mother, what is your response to Cinderella saying that you are wicked?

Justify your actions and say why you are innocent.

You need to craft at least 2 paragraphs in your writing book of a persuasive letter to the detective in charge.

Need help? Try and collect your thoughts using screencastify.

Handy Hints: Look back at the sentence starters to help you!

Critical Literacy - Fractured Fairy Tales - Google Slides