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Technology in writing EYFS/KS1

Aims for today

  • Explore apps and software (technology) that can be used within writing and the teaching of English.
  • Upskill yourselves to gain more confidence or a better understanding of how to use the technology in class.
  • Consider how using technology in writing supports the computing curriculum.

National Curriculum: English

National Curriculum: EYFS

Literacy

Reading: children read and understand simple sentences. They use phonic knowledge to decode regular words and read them aloud accurately. They also read some common irregular words. They demonstrate understanding when talking with others about what they have read.

Writing: children use their phonic knowledge to write words in ways which match their spoken sounds. They also write some irregular common words. They write simple sentences which can be read by themselves and others. Some words are spelt correctly and others are phonetically plausible.

National Curriculum: EYFS

Communication and language

Listening and attention: children listen attentively in a range of situations. They listen to stories, accurately anticipating key events and respond to what they hear with relevant comments, questions or actions. They give their attention to what others say and respond appropriately, while engaged in another activity.

Understanding: children follow instructions involving several ideas or actions. They answer ‘how’ and ‘why’ questions about their experiences and in response to stories or events.

Speaking: children express themselves effectively, showing awareness of listeners’ needs. They use past, present and future forms accurately when talking about events 7 In childminding settings, the key person is the childminder. 10 that have happened or are to happen in the future. They develop their own narratives and explanations by connecting ideas or events.

National Curriculum: Year 1

Word

Sentence

Text

Punctuation

Regular plural noun suffixes –s or –es (e.g. dog, dogs, wish, wishes)

Suffixes that can be added to verbs where no change is needed in the root word (e.g. helping, helped, helper)

How the prefix un- changes the meaning of verbs and adjectives (e.g. unkind, undoing, untie)

How words can combine together to make sentences

Joining words and joining clauses using and

Sequencing sentences to form short narratives

Separation of words with spaces

Introduction to capital letters, full stops, question marks and exclamation marks to demarcate sentences

Capital letters for names and the personal pronoun I

National Curriculum: Year 1

Composition

Pupils should be taught to write sentences by;

Saying out loud what they are going to write about

Composing a sentence orally before writing it

Sequencing sentences to form short narratives

Re-reading what they have written to check that it makes sense

Pupils should be taught to;

Discuss what they have written with the teacher or other pupils

Read aloud their writing clearly enough to be heard by their peers and the teacher

National Curriculum: Year 2

Word

Sentence

Text

Punctuation

Formation of nouns using suffixes such as –ness, -er and by compounding (e.g. whiteboard, superman)

Formation of adjectives using suffixes such as –ful, -less

Use of the suffixes –er , -est in adjectives and the use of –ly in Standard English to turn adjectives into adverbs

Subordination (when, if, that, because) and co-ordination (or, and, but)

Expanded noun phrases for description and specification (e.g. the blue butterfly, plain flour, the man in the moon)

How the grammatical patterns in a sentence indicate it’s function as a statement, question, exclamation or command

Correct choice and consistent use of present and past tense throughout writing

Use of the progressive form of verbs in the present and past tense to mark actions in progress (e.g. she is drumming, he was shouting)

Use of capital letters, full stops, question marks and exclamation marks to demarcate sentences

Commas to separate items in a list

Apostrophes to mark where letters are missing in spelling and to mark singular possession in nouns (e.g. the girl’s name)

National Curriculum: Year 2

Composition

Pupils should be taught to write sentences by;

Saying out loud what they are going to write about

Composing a sentence orally before writing it

Sequencing sentences to form short narratives

Re-reading what they have written to check that it makes sense

Pupils should be taught to;

Discuss what they have written with the teacher or other pupils

Read aloud their writing clearly enough to be heard by their peers and the teacher

Activity

What apps or technology could you use to support this curriculum?

Shadow Puppet Edu

Easily create videos in the classroom. Students as young as five can make videos to tell stories, explain ideas, or document their learning. Add videos into Seesaw to share student learning with classmates and families!

EYFS: Communication, Literacy

Year 1: Word, Sentence, Text Punctuation and Composition

Year 2: Word, Sentence, Text Punctuation and Composition

Learning areas

  • Writing names, lists, labels and captions
  • Learning letters and sounds
  • Recounts
  • Instructions
  • Diary writing
  • Traditional tales
  • Poetry

ChatterPix Kids

Create ChatterPix with friends and family as silly greetings, playful messages, creative cards, or even fancy book reports. And best of all, it’s FREE! AGES: 5-12.

Learning areas

  • Rhyme
  • Learning letters and sounds
  • Recounts
  • Diary writing
  • Traditional tales
  • Poetry

EYFS: Communication

Year 1: Word, Sentence, Punctuation and Composition

Year 2: Word, Sentence, Punctuation and Composition

Pic Collage

A fun photo collage editor with free stickers, grids, fonts & cards for your fall and back-to-school stories!

Download the best free photo editing app for making collages, stories, wallpapers and cards! Choose from hundreds of photo grids, exclusive stickers, and festive background patterns. Then use our intuitive tools to clip, draw, and decorate your collages!

EYFS: Communication, Literacy

Year 1: Word, Sentence, Punctuation and Composition

Year 2: Word, Sentence, Punctuation and Composition

Learning areas

  • Writing names, lists, labels and captions
  • Learning letters and sounds
  • Traditional tales
  • Poetry
  • Shape poetry
  • Arguments For and Against

Keezy

Keezy is a musical instrument for toddlers, professional musicians, and everyone in between! You get 8 colored tiles. You can record a sound into each one. After recording, tap the tile to play it back, or press & hold to loop. Once you've got it down, record a jam to share with your friends!

Learning areas

  • Rhyme
  • Learning letters and sounds
  • Repeated language patterns
  • Recounts
  • Instructional writing
  • Poetry

EYFS: Communication

Year 1: Word, Sentence and Composition

Year 2: Word, Sentence and Composition

Writing Extras

Technology in writing KS2

National Curriculum: English

National Curriculum: Year 3

Word

Sentence

Text

Punctuation

Formation of nouns using a range of prefixes (e.g. super-, anti-, auto-)

Use of the forms a or an according to whether the next word begins with a consonant or vowel (e.g. a rock, an open box)

Word families based on common words, showing how words are related in form and meaning (e.g. solve, solution, solver, dissolve, insoluble)

Expressing time, place and cause using conjunctions ( e.g. when, before, after, while, so, because), adverbs (e.g., then, next, soon, therefore) or prepositions (e.g. before, after, during, in, because of)

Introduction to paragraphs as a way to group related material

Headings and sub-headings to aid presentation

Use of the present perfect form or verbs (e.g. He has gone out to play/ He went out to play)

Introduction to inverted commas to punctuate speech

National Curriculum: Year 4

Word

Sentence

Text

Punctuation

The grammatical difference between plural and possessive –s

Standard English forms for verb inflections instead of local spoken forms (e.g. we were instead of we was, or I did instead of I done)

Noun phrases expanded by the addition of modifying adjectives, nouns and prepositional phrases (e.g. the teacher expanded to the strict maths teacher with curly hair)

Fronted adverbials (e.g. Later that day, I heard the bad news)

Use of paragraphs to organise ideas around a theme

Appropriate choice of pronoun or noun within and across sentences to aid cohesion and avoid repetition

Use of inverted commas and other punctuation to indicate speech (e.g. a comma after the reporting clause; end punctuation within inverted commas: The conductor shouted, “Sit down!”

Apostrophes to mark plural possession (e.g. the girl’s name, the girls’ names)

Use of commas after fronted adverbials

National Curriculum: Year 3&4

Composition

Pupil should be taught to plan their writing by:

Discussing writing similar to that which they are planning to write in order to understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar

Discussing and recording ideas

Pupils should be taught to draft and write by:

Composing and rehearsing sentences orally (including dialogue), progressively building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence structures (English Appendix 2)

Organising paragraphs around a theme

In narratives, creating settings, characters and plot

In non-narratives. Using simple organisational devices (e.g. headings and sub-headings)

National Curriculum: Year 3&4

Composition cont

Pupils should be taught to evaluate and edit by:

  • Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing and suggesting improvements
  • Proposing changes to grammar and vocabulary to improve consistency, including the accurate use of pronouns in sentences

Pupils should be taught to proofread for spelling and punctuation errors

Pupils should be taught to read aloud their own writing, to a group of the whole class, using appropriate intonation and controlling the tone and volume so that the meaning is clear

National Curriculum: Year 5

Word

Sentence

Text

Punctuation

Converting nouns or adjectives into verbs using suffixes [for example, –ate; –ise; –ify]

Verb prefixes [for example, dis–, de–, mis–, over– and re–]

Relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that, or an omitted relative pronoun

Indicating degrees of possibility using adverbs [for example, perhaps, surely] or modal verbs [for example, might, should, will, must]

Devices to build cohesion within a paragraph [for example, then, after that, this, firstly]

Linking ideas across paragraphs using adverbials of time [for example, later], place [for example, nearby] and number [for example, secondly] or tense choices [for example, he had seen her before]

Brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis Use of commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity

National Curriculum: Year 6

Word

Sentence

Text

Punctuation

The difference between vocabulary typical of informal speech and vocabulary appropriate for formal speech and writing [for example, find out – discover; ask for – request; go in – enter]

How words are related by meaning as synonyms and antonyms [for example, big, large, little].

Use of the passive to affect the presentation of information in a sentence [for example, I broke the window in the greenhouse versus The window in the greenhouse was broken (by me)].

The difference between structures typical of informal speech and structures appropriate for formal speech and writing [for example, the use of question tags: He’s your friend, isn’t he?, or the use of subjunctive forms such as If I were or Were they to come in some very formal writing and speech]

Linking ideas across paragraphs using a wider range of cohesive devices: repetition of a word or phrase, grammatical connections [for example, the use of adverbials such as on the other hand, in contrast, or as a consequence], and ellipsis

Layout devices [for example, headings, sub-headings, columns, bullets, or tables, to structure text]

Use of the semi-colon, colon and dash to mark the boundary between independent clauses [for example, It’s raining; I’m fed up]

Use of the colon to introduce a list and use of semi-colons within lists Punctuation of bullet points to list information

How hyphens can be used to avoid ambiguity [for example, man eating shark versus man-eating shark, or recover versus re-cover]

National Curriculum: Year 5&6

Composition

Pupils should be taught to plan their writing by:

  • Identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own
  • Noting and developing initial ideas, drawing on reading and research where necessary
  • In writing narratives, considering how authors have developed characters and settings in what pupils have read, listened to or seen performed

Pupils should be taught to draft and write by:

  • Selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
  • In narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action
  • Précising longer passages
  • Using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs
  • Using further organisational and presentational devices to structure text and to guide the reader (e.g. headings, bullet points, underlining)

National Curriculum: Year 5&6

Composition cont

Pupils should be taught to evaluate and edit by:

  • Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing
  • Proposing changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects and clarify meaning
  • Ensuring the consistent and correct use of tense throughout a piece of writing
  • Ensuring correct subject and verb agreement when using singular and plural distinguishing between the language of speech and writing and choosing the appropriate register

Pupils should be taught to proofread for spelling and punctuation errors

Adobe Spark Page

Spark Page makes it easy for anyone to turn words and images into a beautiful gliding web story. Transform your next newsletter, report, invitation or travel adventure into a gorgeous visual story that delights readers on any device.

Writing genres

  • Narratives
  • Newspapers
  • Reports
  • Information texts
  • Persuasive
  • Biographies
  • Non-chronological reports

Year 3-6: Sentence, Text and Composition

Adobe Spark Post

Adobe Spark Post is the fun, fast and easy way to create stunning graphics for all occasions. Get started in seconds with professionally designed templates you can tweak with just a few taps. Pick your photos, add text and apply Design Filters to instantly create beautiful, eye-catching graphics. Each tap gives you completely new layout, color palette, typography style and filter—no design experience required. Easily share your designs via your favorite social platforms, text or email to wow your audience.

Writing genres

  • Poetry
  • Blurbs
  • Persuasive advert
  • Reviews

Year 3-6:

Word and Sentence

Adobe Spark Video

Spark Video helps anyone create compelling video stories in minutes. Easily add and trim video clips to make your videos stand out on social. Pick from over 1 million beautiful iconic images or add your own photos to highlight what you have to say. Select the soundtrack that works best. Then Spark automatically adds striking cinematic motion to your story — no design experience needed.

Writing genres

  • Playscripts
  • Reports
  • Poetry
  • Explanations
  • Persuasive adverts
  • Instructions
  • Biography

Year 3-6: Sentence, Text and Composition

Padlet

Padlet is a digital canvas to create beautiful projects that are easy to share and collaborate on.

It works like a piece of paper. Yu are given an empty page - a padlet - and you can put whatever you like on it. Drag in a video, record an interview, snap a selfie, write your own text posts or upload some documents, and voilà! A padlet is born. Make it even more beautiful by choosing custom wallpapers and themes.

Year 3-6: Word, Sentence and Punctuation

Writing genres

  • Planning across all genres

Book Creator

Traditionally an iPad app but can be used on a desktop with your Google Account.

All the features of the iPad app but the functionality of Google Drive.

Teacher account allows you up to forty books, onelibrary and the ability to create student accounts with QR logins.

Link here

Writing Extras

Stockport Subject Leaders Technology in Writing - Google Slides