AP English

LANGUAGE &

COMPOSITION

Daily agenda

12 AUGUST 2018

COURSE EXPECTATIONS
INTRODUCTIONS

RESPECT LESSON

SYLLABUS

SUPPLIES YOU NEED

WHY? TO HAVE A SUCCESSFUL YEAR.

{

HOW DOES THIS WORK?

  • DATE (MLA)
  • TOPIC OF STUDY
    (what we’re learning)
  • AGENDA FOR THE DAY (how we’re learning it)
  • Bottom of the page will explain WHY this is our plan
  • NAME
  • ICE CREAM FLAVOR
  • ONE THING YOU HOPE TO GET OUT OF THIS SCHOOL YEAR & WHAT YOU PLAN TO DO TO ACHIEVE THIS GOAL.

3

Introduce yourself:

Supplies

You’ll need

You must have your supplies everyday.

  • Laptop and Charger (EVERYDAY)
  • Pen, Pencil, Highlighter (3 colors)
  • Lined Paper (25+ sheets)
  • Agenda (every student of mine will have an agenda, one they may use for ALL of their classes)
  • Binder (with tabs and all handouts of the semester)

4

Your Company Name

13 AUGUST 2018

LESSON: How to get more out of a text
Sentence Variety Activity

Vocabulary Notebooks

Daily Note-Taking

Get Signed Up: Submit AP Summer Assignments

Reading Strategies/

The Big Five
Article: “English is a

Crazy Language”

WHY? To more fully understand and analyze what we read.

How is writing like skateboarding?

GET SIGNED UP

7

  • Start a Google Slideshow, and everyday, copy over the slides of that day. Use the same doc. for the entire semester. Here you will write responses to daily quickwrites, and I will check them for credit.
    • Title your slideshow:
      • “AP Lang/Comp - Last name, First Name”
    • Share it with:
      • duarteenglishclass@gmail.com
  • Remind.com
    • remind.com/join/6f4cka
    • OR text @6f4cka to the number 81010
  • Turnitin.com
    • Period 3
      • Enrollment ID: 21848744
      • Password: mrtsuyuki
  • Bookmark (CTR + D)
    • mrtsuyuki.weebly.com

Directions: In groups, create as many variations to the following statement. Hint: Don’t limit yourself to the words used; focus on the idea behind the statement.

“Your letter has delighted

me very much.”

14 AUGUST 2018

LESSON: How to get more out of a text

Reading Strategies/

The Big Five
Article: “English is a

Crazy Language”

Summarizing (Set up a Google Doc.)

HW: Complete Summaries (submit on Turnitin.com by 11:59pm)

WHY? To more fully understand and analyze what we read.

5

Approach every reading task—essays, portions of novels, poetry, informative pieces—with these five questions in mind:

  • What is this passage about? (the topic) (both literature and nonfiction)
  • What does the passage say? (What the words mean—the literal meaning as it develops through the passage) (both literature and nonfiction)
  • How does the author develop meaning through the text? (How is it organized? Purposeful organization is called rhetorical organization.)
  • What is the narrative perspective—speaker/author’s point of view? (literature)
    What is the narrative stance—speaker/author’s position (nonfiction)
  • What does the passage mean (theme) (literature)?
    What does the writer want the reader to feel, think, do (rhetorical purpose)? (nonfiction)

THE BIG

SOAPSTONE

I. SOAPSTONE Analysis – you begin by identifying each part (subject, occasion, etc.) as much as you can from considering carefully all information given you either in text introduction, or in the text itself.

Subject: (What is text about?)

Occasion: (What circumstances led to text?) - A.K.A. “EXIGENCY”

Audience: (For whom is text intended?)

Purpose: (What does speaker/writer want audience to feel, to think, and to do?)

Speaker: (Who is the speaker?)

Tone: (What is the speaker’s attitude(s) towards his/her subject?)

14 AUGUST 2018

LESSON: How to get more out of a text

Reading Strategies/

The Big Five
Article: “English is a

Crazy Language”

Summarizing (Set up a Google Doc.) & T.E.S.T. Paragraph

HW: Parent Signature Syllabus forms due tomorrow

Complete Summaries & T.E.S.T. Paragraph (submit on Turnitin.com

by 11:59pm on Friday)

WHY? To more fully understand and analyze what we read.

Syllabus Forms Due Tomorrow!

YOUR TASKS

Part 1: Read/Annotate/SOAPSTONE/BIG5 ~ “English is a Crazy Language

Part 2:

After reading, develop a summary using the big 5 questions as a guide.

(Summaries do not have quotes).

Part 3:

Answer the following question in a paragraph using evidence from the text:
How is the English language arbitrary at times?


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Remember to update your vocabulary notebook

if you found a word or two from the Lederer text.

(Parts 1, 2, & 3 Due FRIDAY p.m.)

Sample T.E.S.T. Paragraph: How is the English language arbitrary at times?

T: In some cases, words have meanings that are actually contradictory to what their root words suggest.

E: Richard Lederer’s “English is a Crazy Language” demonstrates how English can often be paradoxical or backwards. He points to several examples, such as how “people drive in a parkway and park in a driveway” and how things are “shipp[ed] by truck” but cargo is sent “by ship” (183).

S: In this example, the word “parkway” is confusing because it suggests parking rather than its actual meaning, which is to drive through it. Conversely, a driveway suggests movement, but it is the one place where we are stationary. What is more, he calls attention to how “shipping” something generally refers to the transportation of goods via truck, which is a type of car. What Lederer is really questioning is why goods that trucked are not considered cargo and why goods that are shipped do not travel via ship.

T: It is in this sense that a word’s parts do not always determine its actual meaning. Instead, the meaning is seemingly arbitrary to the word itself, requiring users to memorize not language rules, but individual word meanings and their respective exceptions to language rules.

19 AUGUST 2018

LESSON: Writing with Specificity

Entrance Ticket

If I’m writing, you’re writing.

Grammar/Writing Notebook

Sentence Types

Sensory Language & “Be Specific” (Goldberg)

HW: Picture day tomorrow / Complete Goldberg questions in a Google Doc: (#1, #2, #5, #6) -- Due Tues PM

WHY? To make writing more specific and more engaging. To convey what we mean and to do so with clarity.

Vocabulary check: 8/30

Entrance Ticket:

Describe your first day when you first walked onto campus.

Be specific. Be thorough.

20 AUGUST 2018

LESSON: Writing with Specificity

Picture Day!

HW: Complete Goldberg questions in a Google Doc:

(#1, #2, #5, #6) -- Due Tues PM

Study for Syllabus Quiz

Work on vocabulary Notebooks

WHY? To make writing more specific and more engaging. To convey what we mean and to do so with clarity.

Vocabulary check: 8/30

21 AUGUST 2018

LESSON: Sentence Types & Analysis

Entrance Ticket

Sentence Types Review

Semicolons, Active vs. Passive Language (Writing Packet)
Rhetoric -

Pathos: Juxtaposition / Superimposition / Dichotomy

Banksy Image Analysis

HW: Finish Sentence Types Analysis of Banksy Image


WHY? To make writing more specific and more engaging. To convey what we mean and to do so with clarity.

Vocabulary check: 8/30

Entrance Ticket:

What does the following image by street artist, Banksy, signify?

Artist: Banksy

Using evidence from observations, reading, and experience, what does this image signify? Consider Goldberg’s “Be Specific” in crafting your response.

Answer using at least one of the following sentence types:

  • 1 simple (black)
  • 1 compound (red)
  • 1 complex (green)
  • 1 compound-complex (blue)

(Color-code each type of sentence.)

Artist: Banksy

22-23 AUGUST 2019

LESSON: Sentence Types

Entrance Ticket

Sentence Types (Review)

Rhetoric ~ Pathos

HW: Begin Reading “Remarks Concerning the Savages” (Franklin

pp.218-222) if you want to get ahead.

Annotate ONLY for content/meaning (not analysis)


WHY? To make writing more specific and more engaging. To convey what we mean and to do so with clarity.

Vocabulary check: 8/30

The Amazon is burning, and humans are likely to blame.

Environmental organizations and researchers say the wildfires blazing in the Brazilian rainforest were set by cattle ranchers and loggers who want to clear and utilize the land, emboldened by the country's pro-business president.

"The vast majority of these fires are human-lit," said Christian Poirier, the program director of non-profit organization Amazon Watch. He added that even during dry seasons, the Amazon -- a humid rainforest -- doesn't catch on fire easily, unlike the dry bushland in California or Australia.

Farmers and ranchers have long used fire to clear land, said Poirier, and are likely behind the unusually large number fires burning in the Amazon today.

The country's space research center (INPE) said this week that the number of fires in Brazil are 80% higher than last year. More than half are in the Amazon region, spelling disaster for the local environment and ecology.

And 99% percent of the fires result from human actions "either on purpose or by accident," Alberto Setzer, a senior scientist at INPE, said. The burning can range from a small-scale agricultural practice, to new deforestation for a mechanized and modern agribusiness project, Setzer told CNN by email.

https://www.cnn.com/2019/08/22/americas/amazon-fires-humans-intl-hnk-trnd/index.html

Entrance Ticket:

What type(s) of emotional response(s) does this advertisement seek to draw from its audience?

Reference specific things about this image.

Tommy Boy Video:

How is Tommy attempting to use pathos

in his sales pitch?

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

For a more thorough response, answer these questions:

WHAT does he do to appeal to pathos, HOW does he do it, and WHY does he do it?

SENTENCE FRAME:

"In order to _____________, Tommy [does what?].

[part of the story] creates a sense of [an emotion]."

In order to sell brake pads, Tommy creates a demonstration to instill fear and guilt into the potential buyer. Specifically, he demonstrates, albeit through a farce exaggeration, what it would look like if one used “the other guy’s” brake pads. The demonstration depicts a burning car, and a new paramedic “puking” all in an effort to make the buyer feel guilty. This stands in stark contrast to his demonstration of Tommy’s brake pads, where a moving vehicle is able to safely come to a stop.

Maya Angelou: “Caged Bird” Excerpt:

READ:

The free bird thinks of another breeze

and the trade winds soft through the singing trees

and the fat worms waiting on a dawn bright lawn

and he names the sky his own

But a caged bird stands on the grave of dreams

his shadow shouts on a nightmare scream

his wings are clipped and his feet are tied

so he opens his throat to sing.

WRITE: (POST ON PADLET)

Caged bird is a poem about slavery and oppression.

How does Maya Angelou elicit an emotional response from her readers? Provide evidence from the text to support your answer.

SENTENCE FRAME:

"In order to elicit [what emotional response?], Maya Angelou [does what? / What tools does she use?]." [Expand on your topic sentence - T.E.S.T.]

26 AUGUST 2019

LESSON: Logos / Grammar

Entrance Ticket

Comma Splices/Semi Colons

Rhetoric ~ Logos

HW: Begin Reading “Remarks Concerning the Savages” (Franklin

pp.218-222) if you want to get ahead.

Annotate ONLY for content/meaning (not analysis)


WHY? To make writing more specific and more engaging. To convey what we mean and to do so with clarity.

Vocabulary check: 8/30

Entrance Ticket:

Write one compound-complex sentence in the following order:

IC - DC - IC

Using: “Since” / “But”

4 min.

American schools harbor approximately 2.1 million bullies and 2.7 million of their victims.

19.6% of high school students in the US report being bullied at school in the past year.

56% of students have personally witnessed some type of bullying at school.

87% of students said shootings are motivated by a desire to “get back at those who have hurt them.”

Based on the statistics above, write ONE CLAIM about bullying. How did you come to that conclusion?

5 min.

"Based on the statistics on bullying, my partner claims that _________."

SAY:

2 min.

LOGOS: Using facts and statistics

The logic used to support a claim (induction and deduction); can also be the facts and statistics used to help support the argument.

HOW DOES 7up USE LOGOS?

5 min.

7 min.

6 min.

How do you know if someone is a witch?

4 min.

6 min.

29 AUGUST 2019

LESSON: Logos / Grammar

Entrance Ticket

Active vs. Passive Language (packet)

Rhetoric ~ Ethos

HW: Vocabulary Check Tomorrow


WHY? To make writing more specific and more engaging. To convey what we mean and to do so with clarity.

Vocabulary check: 8/30

Ethos

An appeal to character and trustworthiness

Entrance Ticket:

In 4 or so sentences, explain why these advertisements have professional athletes.

Characteristics of ETHOS:

1. Appeal to the writer’s/speaker’s believability, qualifications, character; relevant biographical information

2. Use of credible sources (experts, scholars)

3. Accurate citation of sources: gives credit where credit is due

4. Experience and authority: person knows the issues and has experience in the field.

5. Appropriate language: uses language of the discipline

6. Appropriate tone: knows the audience and context of situation

7. Humility: is not arrogant

--------------------------------------------------------------------

Uses tentative yet authoritative language; avoids sweeping statements like “Everyone is doing this,” “This is the only way,” “This will always work.” Instead says, “The research suggests that,” “Some experts believe,” “In my experience,” etc.

Choose one of the two scenarios and

use ethos as your mode of persuasion:

(Remember, ETHOS is how the author establishes CREDIBILITY/TRUSTWORTHINESS)

Situation 1: Your friend is about to make a very poor decision (you have to come up with this)…convince him/her of what he/she should do instead and why.

OR

Situation 2: Your parents are going away and want to get you a sitter for the weekend…you don’t want that…persuade them!

30 AUGUST 2019

LESSON: Remarks Concerning the Savages (Franklin’s Rhetoric)

Entrance Ticket

Vocabulary Check

Forest and The Trees (and on highlighting)

Page 1 and rhetoric

Embedding quotes

HW: Enjoy your weekend


WHY? To make writing more specific and more engaging. To convey what we mean and to do so with clarity.

Vocabulary check: 9/13

Entrance Ticket:

What rhetorical appeal is being used here? How?

4 min.

FOREST & THE TREES

To the left of the text,

make “FOREST” notes:

these determine what the author is saying (short summaries).

To the right of the text,

make “Trees” notes:

these highlight HOW the author is saying it (rhetorical strategies the author uses).

Early on his essay, Franklin distinguishes the Native Americans from the Colonials, contextualizing how Native Americans are an organized and role-based society.

Find a piece of evidence to support this topic sentence:

3 min.

Franklin juxtaposes how while colonials view Native Americans’ lifestyles as irrelevant, the Native Americans equally see Colonials as “frivolous and useless” (1).

3 September 2019

LESSON: Remarks Concerning the Savages (Franklin’s Rhetoric)

SPACECAT

Page 1 and rhetoric

Embedding quotes

HW: Create ONE T.E.S.T. Paragraph analyzing Franklin’s use of rhetoric.


WHY? To make writing more specific and more engaging. To convey what we mean and to do so with clarity.

Vocabulary check: 9/13

Exploring Rhetoric with

SPACECAT

Speaker

  • Who wrote this?
  • What do we know about them?
  • What DON’T we know about them?
  • Does this text have a particular meaning because of WHO wrote/said it?

  • Examples: A President giving a speech, a citizen sending a Tweet, a newspaper staff writing an editorial

Purpose

  • What is the speaker hoping to accomplish by putting this out into the world?
  • Remember that the message itself ≠ the purpose.

  • Examples: to inform, to persuade , to inspire, to convince

Audience

  • Who was the actual audience of this text? Was that the intended audience?
  • What did the speaker assume about their audience? How does that impact what they say and how they say it?

  • Examples: TV viewers watching a debate, readers of a newspaper, a crowd gathered at a rally

context

  • What was going on in the world when this text was produced?
  • What were the biggest issues on the speaker’s mind, which they might be directly or indirectly addressing?
  • How would this same text be received differently by a different audience in or in a different time?

  • Examples: MLK’s “I Have a Dream” Speech is given in the context of the Civil Rights Movement

exigence

  • Why “NOW” for the speaker?
  • What was the spark or catalyst that moved the speaker to act?
  • Note that context is “happening” all the time, but usually an event serves as exigence.

  • Examples: The #MeToo movement taking off after high profile reports of misconduct

choices

  • This is a CAT-egory of all the little moves authors make to enrich their writing.
  • Why does the writer make each choice?

  • Examples: a speechwriter may begin with an anecdote, then move to describing a process of change, and end with a call to action.

appeals

  • Appeals to ethics or credibility
  • Appeals to emotion
  • Appeals to logic or reason

  • Examples: Bringing up one’s expertise with the topic (credibility), telling a moving story (emotion), stating facts or statistics (logic)

tone

  • What is the speaker’s attitude at different places throughout the text?
  • How can you tell this is their attitude?
  • Where does the tone shift in the piece?

  • Examples: A religious eulogy may begin with a mournful tone, then move into a comforting or inspirational tone.

When to use space cat?

  • Rhetorical analysis requires you to read and understand what matters about a text (SPACE) and comment on what specific features make it rich or effective (CAT).

  • Don’t panic when exploring a new or difficult text…

SPACE CAT will guide you into the unknown!

Space cat was created by heather Crivilare

$
the creator claims no copyright on the images or fonts in this PowerPoint. For educational use only.

For more AP Lang fun, check out these other resources from The English Department!

Rhetorical Analysis as a “Play-by-play”

In most professional sports broadcasts, commentators discuss key features of the game and often point to HOW particular decisions led to various outcomes.

E.g. KOBE SCORES POINTS. In the third quarter, Kobe had a 10-0 run against

the Spurs, which led to a change of momentum for the Lakers, and ultimately,

giving them the win.

In many ways, rhetorical analysis asks you to accomplish a similar task:

Identify key features of the author’s argument and point out HOW

they help to make her/him more persuasive.

E.g. FRANKLIN CALLS THE NATIVE AMERICANS “SAVAGES”. Franklin’s sarcastic use of “savage”

to identify Native Americans calls attention to the hypocrisy of the colonists and reinforces his

comparisons of civility between the two groups

KEY:

WHAT HAPPENS:

HOW:

EFFECT:

T.E.S.T. for Rhetorical Analysis:

TOPIC SENTENCE:

  • Locate the reader to the part of the text you’ll be discussing (“Less than ten words into his speech, Franklin...) -- this allows you to contextualize for the reader what you’re about to quote.
  • What does (s)he do?
  • Why does (s)he do it?
  • Avoid using verbs like “uses” (e.g. Franklin uses juxtaposition); instead, use the actual verb (e.g. Franklin juxtaposes).

EVIDENCE:

  • Hint: point out specific words or short phrases.
  • Be sure to keep quotes less than seven words and they must be embedded in a sentence

SIGNIFICANCE:

  • Answer this question: How is this evidence proof of your topic sentence and what does it do for the rhetorical purpose of your essay?
  • Try to stray away from saying “this is ethos because it …” -- instead, say something like, “his word choice here demonstrates his ability to empathize with [the audience], which, in turn, gives him credibility.”

TIE-BACK:

  • Sum up everything you wrote about in one succinct sentence.

[THE MORE YOU CAN BLEND THESE PARTS TOGETHER, THE MORE YOUR WRITING WILL SHOW MATURITY.]

Franklin ends his discussion by juxtaposing how each of the groups are hospitable to their guests. He discusses how the Native Americans pamper visitors with food and give them a space to relax. In fact, strangers will be be dried “if [they are] wet” and “warm[ed] if [they are] cold” (3). Conversely, if a Native American were to visit a colonial town’s cabin, they would most certainly ask, “where is your money?” (ibid). This comparison illustrates two points: neither the colonists nor the Native Americans are uncivilized, and that civility is defined in different ways. Franklin proves that the Native Americans are clearly more hospitable and selfless than the colonists, and through this comparison, Franklin’s audience is able to logically conclude that the Native Americans have more civility than them. Therefore, the Native Americans could not possibly be the “savages” they have been dehumanized to be.

4 September 2019

LESSON: Remarks Concerning the Savages (Franklin’s Rhetoric)

CLUB Help

Share TEST Paragraphs on Padlet (Review as class)

FOCUS: Embedding quotes and explaining evidence

Thesis statements

HW: Develop another TEST paragraph analyzing a different strategy that supports your thesis


WHY? To make writing more specific and more engaging. To convey what we mean and to do so with clarity.

Vocabulary check: 9/13

T.E.S.T. for Rhetorical Analysis:

TOPIC SENTENCE:

  • Locate the reader to the part of the text you’ll be discussing (“Less than ten words into his speech, Franklin...) -- this allows you to contextualize for the reader what you’re about to quote.
  • What does (s)he do?
  • Why does (s)he do it?
  • Avoid using verbs like “uses” (e.g. Franklin uses juxtaposition); instead, use the actual verb (e.g. Franklin juxtaposes).

EVIDENCE:

  • Hint: point out specific words or short phrases.
  • Be sure to keep quotes less than seven words and they must be embedded in a sentence

SIGNIFICANCE:

  • Answer this question: How is this evidence proof of your topic sentence and what does it do for the rhetorical purpose of your essay?
  • Try to stray away from saying “this is ethos because it …” -- instead, say something like, “his word choice here demonstrates his ability to empathize with [the audience], which, in turn, gives him credibility.”

TIE-BACK:

  • Sum up everything you wrote about in one succinct sentence.

[THE MORE YOU CAN BLEND THESE PARTS TOGETHER, THE MORE YOUR WRITING WILL SHOW MATURITY.]

Franklin ends his discussion by juxtaposing how each of the groups are hospitable to their guests. He discusses how the Native Americans pamper visitors with food and give them a space to relax. In fact, strangers will be be dried “if [they are] wet” and “warm[ed] if [they are] cold” (3). Conversely, if a Native American were to visit a colonial town’s cabin, they would most certainly ask, “where is your money?” (ibid). This comparison illustrates two points: neither the colonists nor the Native Americans are uncivilized, and that civility is defined in different ways. Franklin proves that the Native Americans are clearly more hospitable and selfless than the colonists, and through this comparison, Franklin’s audience is able to logically conclude that the Native Americans have more civility than them. Therefore, the Native Americans could not possibly be the “savages” they have been dehumanized to be.

5 September 2019

LESSON: Remarks Concerning the Savages (Franklin’s Rhetoric)

FOCUS: Embedding quotes and explaining evidence

Thesis statements

HW: Develop another TEST paragraph analyzing a different strategy that supports your thesis (You should have TWO in total)


WHY? To make writing more specific and more engaging. To convey what we mean and to do so with clarity.

Vocabulary check: 9/13

THESIS:

What/how: What does the author do (rhetorically)

Why: For what purpose? (in order to…)

6 September 2019

LESSON: Remarks Concerning the Savages (Franklin’s Rhetoric)

Submit HW on Turnitin.com

Prompt

FOCUS: Introductory paragraphs and thesis statements

SPACECAT RA Outline

HW: Develop your introduction and a third TEST paragraph analyzing a different strategy that supports your thesis (You should have 4 paragraphs in total)


WHY? To make writing more specific and more engaging. To convey what we mean and to do so with clarity.

Vocabulary check: 9/13

In a well-written essay, analyze the rhetorical choices Franklin makes to develop his argument about civility.

The Prompt:

9 September 2019

LESSON: Remarks Concerning the Savages (Franklin’s Rhetoric)

Submit HW on Turnitin.com

FOCUS: Conclusions and polishing body paragraphs (analysis)

Reference SPACECAT RA Outline

HW: Rough drafts due tomorrow


WHY? To make writing more specific and more engaging. To convey what we mean and to do so with clarity.

Vocabulary check: 9/13

10 September 2019

LESSON: Remarks Concerning the Savages (Franklin’s Rhetoric)

Workshop (Global Issues of Essay)

HW: Revise Essays and bring ONE hard copy


WHY? To make writing more specific and more engaging. To convey what we mean and to do so with clarity.

Vocabulary check: 9/13

11 September 2019

LESSON: Remarks Concerning the Savages (Franklin’s Rhetoric)

Recognizing strengths and improving embedded quotes

Workshop (LOCAL Issues of Essay)

College and Career Interest Survey:

https://forms.gle/4FRwUrFviDQhtzfKA

LOOK FOR:

Word choice/clarity/punctuation/grammar/awkward phrasing/strong verbs/active voice/sentence variety/wordiness/tense errors/comma splices

HW: Revise Essays and submit Final Drafts to turnitin.com by 9/13


WHY? To make writing more specific and more engaging. To convey what we mean and to do so with clarity.

Vocabulary check: 9/13

Embedding Quotes

Copy and Paste one of your embedded quotes (from your essay) onto Padlet (don’t put your name). Then look at a peer’s submission and leave a comment with the following feedback:

What are they doing well in the quote?

What’s one thing they could do to make that quote even better?

  • Sentences beginning with an -ing word need an independent clause (otherwise, they are a fragment)
  • Write your papers in 3rd person, unless first person is used for a narrative voice
    • NO “YOU” / “WE” / “US” / “YOUR”
  • Commas and periods go INSIDE quotation marks
  • No contractions (ctrl + F = ‘)
  • No alot/a lot
  • Search “IS” (ctrl + F = is) - if it is followed by an -ing word, change it do a more direct verb (e.g. is discussing → “discusses”)
  • Incorporate strong, specific verbs (e.g. “uses” → “examines”)
  • Avoid saying “issue”; just identify the specific issue.
  • Avoid words like “big” (e.g. play a big role), “really,” or any other evaluative words when analyzing authors.

Quick Searches

to find errors

12-13 SEPTEMBER 2019

LESSON: “On Indian Removal” and Characterization

Read and annotate (in groups) the Andrew Jackson “On Indian Removal”

    • Submit Essays (by Friday at 10:30am)
    • SPACECAT
    • Annotations: (RIGHT: What does he say? / LEFT: How does he say it”
    • Complete table about positive/negative language (THURSDAY)
    • FRIDAY: One paragraph (Submit to Padlet) - How does Jackson’s characterization of the Native Americans contrast with Franklin’s and why is this important to his argument?

HW: Franklin Rhetorical Analysis due Friday (at the start of class)

VOCABULARY Check THIS Friday!

Jackson Questions (online) due Sunday

Next Vocabulary check: 10/4

16 SEPTEMBER 2019

LESSON: “On Indian Removal” and Characterization

    • Submit HW if you haven’t already
    • Semicolon/Comma Splice/Sentence Types Review for quiz
    • Says-Does-Because RA Strategy

HW: Grammar Quiz Wednesday (Study!)

Re-read Jackson’s essay and take copious notes

On-demand practice quiz tomorrow

Next Vocabulary check: 10/4

Says-Does-Because

When and What does the author say (SAYS)? Summarize and then provide evidence.

What does it do for the author’s purpose and audience (DOES)?

Why or how does it do this (BECAUSE)?

17 SEPTEMBER 2019

LESSON: “On Indian Removal” and Characterization

    • Writing Club Business
    • Says-Does-Because Handout
    • On demand practice quiz

HW: Grammar Quiz Wednesday (Study!)

Next Vocabulary check: 10/4

18 SEPTEMBER 2019

LESSON: “On Indian Removal” and Characterization

    • Quiz
    • Characterization: Comparing Jackson with Franklin
    • One-on-one conferences

HW: Finishing Jackson-Franklin Analysis

Next Vocabulary check: 10/4

Characterization

How does Jackson’s characterization of the Native Americans contrast with Franklin’s

and why is this important to his argument?

(provide evidence from both articles to support your answer)

19 SEPTEMBER 2019

LESSON: “On Indian Removal” and Characterization

    • The People of Paper
    • 100-Second Analysis Videos (see website)
    • One-on-one conferences

HW: Work on Videos

Next Vocabulary check: 10/4

To EMBED your video on PADLET:

Upload your video to Youtube FIRST. Be sure to have your youtube video set to “public,” or no one can see it. Click on this paperclip-looking icon and paste your YOUTUBE video URL (link). Put your full name in the title.

20 SEPTEMBER 2019

LESSON: “On Indian Removal” and Characterization

    • Parent Letters (TPOP)
    • 100-Second Analysis Videos (see website)
    • One-on-one conferences

HW: Videos due Sunday

Next Vocabulary check: 10/4

23 SEPTEMBER 2019

LESSON: Declaration of Independence

Declaration and Persuasion

Group Reading/Analysis

HW: Finish reading and analysis of Declaration

Work on Vocabulary

Next Vocabulary check: 10/4

24 SEPTEMBER 2019

LESSON: Declaration of Independence

Join our Fight Letter

HW: Letter due Thursday in class (Videos due Friday)

Work on Vocabulary

Next Vocabulary check: 10/4

25 SEPTEMBER 2019

Civics Assembly this Period

Alex Padilla, CA Secretary of State, Speaks to DHS

HW: Letter due Thursday in class (Videos due Friday)

Work on Vocabulary

Next Vocabulary check: 10/4

26 SEPTEMBER 2019

LESSON: Declaration of Sentiments

Elizabeth Caddy Stanton’s and Rhetoric

Read/Annotate

SPACECAT

HW: Finish reading, Questions due Friday PM.

Next Vocabulary check: 10/4

27 SEPTEMBER 2019

LESSON: Declaration of Sentiments

Elizabeth Caddy Stanton and Rhetoric

Finish Reading/Annotating & identifying SPACECAT

Work on Questions (use embedded quotes -- evidence -- to support answers)

HW: Finish reading, Questions due Friday PM.

Next Vocabulary check: 10/4

30 SEPTEMBER 2019

LESSON: Declaration of Sentiments

Rhetorical Appeals Handout

Rhetorical Analysis - Choices and Analysis

HW: On-Demand Assessment Tomorrow

Vocabulary this Friday!

Next Vocabulary check: 10/4

Rhetorical Analysis Essays

INTRODUCTION:

SUBJECT, CONTEXT, AUDIENCE, PURPOSE, CHOICES (OF FOCUS)

AND GENERAL APPEALS (ACHIEVED THROUGH THOSE CHOICES)

BODY PARAGRAPHS:

EXAMINE CHOICES, FUNCTION OF THEM, AND THEIR EFFECTS ON AUDIENCE/PURPOSE.

CONCLUSIONS:

Run through the various choices the author made to persuade her/his audience

26 SEPTEMBER 2018

LESSON: Argumentative Writing

Entrance Ticket

Lens Assignments - Language/Social Class/Science/Social Norms

The Big Necessity Intro

HW: Vocabulary Check 10/4

Begin reading/Annotating Ch.1 - Due Monday (expect a quiz)

Next Vocabulary check: 10/4

Take a position, develop an argument/thesis, and defend it to your best ability in 10 min.

Does technology make us more alone?

Entrance Ticket:

3 October 2019

LESSON: Argumentative Writing

Entrance Ticket

Lens Assignments - Language/Social Class/Science/Social Norms

Read/Annotate The Big Necessity Intro

HW: Read Ch.1 (by Monday - possible quiz)

Vocabulary Check Tomorrow

Begin reading/Annotating Ch.1 - Due Monday (expect a quiz)

Next Vocabulary check: 10/4

From talk radio to television shows, from popular magazines to Web blogs, ordinary citizens, political figures, and entertainers express their opinions on a wide range of topics. Are these opinions worthwhile?

Does the expression of such opinions foster democratic values? Write an essay in which you take a position on the value of such public statements of opinion, supporting your view with appropriate evidence.

Entrance Ticket:

  • Consider the lens on which you’ve been asked to focus your reading.
  • Read the introduction of TBN
  • Prepare a one page slide (to be presented before the class) that examines how Rose George’s argument might be considered through your respective lens. Focus on 4-5 examples from the text.

    Answer the following question:

    What is Rose George’s argument and how does she use science, social class, social norms, or language to make it?

Reading Groups

4 October 2019

LESSON: Argumentative Writing

Vocabulary Check

Lens Assignments - Language/Social Class/Science/Social Norms

Read/Annotate The Big Necessity Intro

Presentations

HW: Read/annotate Ch.1 (by Monday - possible quiz)

Next Vocabulary check: 10/25

  • Consider the lens on which you’ve been asked to focus your reading.
  • Read the introduction of TBN
  • Prepare a one page slide (to be presented before the class) that examines how Rose George’s argument might be considered through your respective lens. Focus on 4-5 examples from the text.

    Answer the following question:

    What is Rose George’s argument and how does she use science, social class, social norms, or language to make it?

Reading Groups

7-8 October 2018

LESSON: Argumentative Writing

Quiz

On-Demand Essay Debrief

Rhetorical Analysis of TBN

PSA (Tomorrow)

HW: Read/Annotate Ch.4 by Wednesday’s class

Next Vocabulary check: 10/25

Consider George’s argument about human waste and analyze two strategies (from one section/piece of evidence) she uses to make her argument more effective to her audience.

Rhetorical Analysis

Two-thirds through the chapter, George reinforces the impact human waste has on health. She makes the distinction that cholera, a deadly infection, relies on human excreta to function as “inadvertent seeders . . . by expelling diarrhea violently and relentlessly” (24). This allows George to reinforce the cause and effect relationship between humans and disease, which reiterates to her audience that only they can circumvent avoidable health crises related to sanitation. Her graphic diction, “violently and relentlessly,” while accurately chosen adverbs, depict an uncomfortable scene many have likely encountered at some point in their lives, but one to which they most certainly would want to revisit. In essence, this scene creates a sense of disgust and fear for her audience, and in doing so, she manages to communicate the impact and devastation of cholera in order to emphasize the importance of sanitation, furthering the case that more needs to be done to address how we deal with human waste.

9 October 2019

LESSON: Argumentative Writing

Quiz

PSA (Ch. 4)

HW: Read/Annotate Ch.6 by Tuesday’s class

Next Vocabulary check: 10/25

Towers

Explain how you built your group’s tower. What strategies went into its construction.

How did these strategies impact the end result (the purpose).

10-11 October 2019

LESSON: Argumentative Writing

Tower Activity Debrief

Rhetorical Analysis Ch. 4 (one paragraph)

PSA (Ch. 4) - Due Friday PM

HW: Read/Annotate Ch.6 by Tuesday’s class

Next Vocabulary check: 10/25

11 October 2019

LESSON: Argumentative Writing

Submit Paragraphs on TII

PSA (Ch. 4) - Due Monday PM

HW: Read/Annotate Ch.6 by Tuesday’s class

Next Vocabulary check: 10/25

Develop a PSA:

Using sensory language, develop a PSA that calls attention to an issue raised in Ch. 1 or 4.

You should persuade your audience to rethink the consequences of daily life in terms of how that practice affects the sewage system. Use at least 2 rhetorical strategies to appeal to your audience.

Include: a picture, sensory language of the daily practice on which you’re focusing, and a slogan.

15 October 2019

LESSON: Argumentative Writing

Submit PSAs

Ch. 6 quiz

AP Classroom

Analysis Questions

HW: Questions due Wednesday PM.

Vocabulary due next week.

Next Vocabulary check: 10/25

16 October 2019

LESSON: Argumentative Writing

Perception Filter Essay Prompt

AP Classroom - Progress check UNIT 1

Group Discussion

HW: Ch. 6 Questions due Tonight.

Vocabulary due next week.

Next Vocabulary check: 10/25

17 October 2019

LESSON: Argumentative Writing

Perception Filter Essay Workshop - Research/Articles

What’s credible?

HW: Find 2 articles to bring to class

Vocabulary due next week.

Next Vocabulary check: 10/25

18 October 2019

LESSON: Argumentative Writing

Entrance Ticket

Perception Filter Essay Workshop - Research/Articles

Annotated Bibliography

Outline format

One-on-one meetings

HW: Annotated Bibliographies due 10/22

Vocabulary due next week.

Next Vocabulary check: 10/25

What two articles did you bring? How do you know they’re credible? What about them seems helpful to your topic?

Entrance Ticket:

Annotated Bibliography: What to include for each entry

  • 2-3 Sentence summary of the source
  • How will I use this source to develop my argument?
  • What is insufficient about this source?
    What does this source not include that would be helpful to your thesis?

Annotated Bibliography: Formatting

Also include sources that you will use to support these arguments.

THESIS STATEMENTS:

It might be helpful to work on the body of your essay, determine what your problem-solution argument will be, and then write your thesis.

SAMPLE OUTLINE

Thesis Statement:

In addressing the essay prompt, your essay should try to answer the following questions:


What are you arguing?

Why is it a sustainability issue? Because / which...

How will you defend your position? By...


Example:

By creating policy to control fishing and punish violators, the overfishing of marine species at the top of the food chain can be controlled, which would end the threat of running out of food and permanently damaging oceanic ecosystems.

21 October 2019

LESSON: Argumentative Writing

Perception Filter Essay Workshop

Work on Annotated Bibliography (due tomorrow) & Outline

HW: Annotated Bibliographies due 10/22

Vocabulary due Friday.

Next Vocabulary check: 10/25

22 October 2019

LESSON: Argumentative Writing

Perception Filter Essay Workshop

Thesis check-in

Complete Outline

HW: Outlines due tomorrow

Vocabulary due Friday.

Next Vocabulary check: 10/25

Also include sources that you will use to support these arguments.

THESIS STATEMENTS:

It might be helpful to work on the body of your essay, determine what your problem-solution argument will be, and then write your thesis.

SAMPLE OUTLINE

23 October 2019

LESSON: Argumentative Writing

Perception Filter Essay Workshop

Use outlines to develop rough drafts.

Work on body paragraphs first

HW: Rough Drafts due Friday (Bring one HARD COPY)

Vocabulary due Friday.

Next Vocabulary check: 10/25

24 October 2019

LESSON: Argumentative Writing

Perception Filter Essay Workshop

Finish developing first drafts

First drafts are your best attempt at a final draft

HW: First Drafts due Friday (Bring one HARD COPY)

Vocabulary due Friday.

Next Vocabulary check: 10/25

H.O.T. INTRODUCTIONS:

Sample Paragraph: Moving away from sources based arguments

One of the difficulties in addressing global warming is not simply that so much contributes to it, but that addressing these factors will certainly hamper the lifestyles of developed countries. Consequently, this makes it difficult to change, as many are unwilling to, say, spend more for the benefit, albeit slow, of this planet’s inhabitants. For every household, it would cost an estimated $175 per year on average to address the lifestyle changes necessary to minimize greenhouse emissions (Vergano 1). For some, this additional expense may seem minimal, but for many underprivileged families, this can significantly damper not just their lifestyles, but their ability to provide for their families altogether. This does not mean that nothing should be done, however. In fact, according to “Global Warming Cuts Have a Price,” doing nothing has adverse financial consequences not directly related to the global warming issue, including the annual “$120 billion in health expenses nationwide” just from burning fossil fuels (ibid). Though Vergano does not provide specific solutions to this issue, he does raise an important political point: this issue must start with policy. Without the regulations and governmental support, the world will rely on citizens to independently change in a system that does not support that change, a truth that all governments need to address together. That is to say, governments around the world need to get together and come to an agreement on how to tackle the climate change crisis, and more importantly, everyone needs to be on-board.

Which will

you choose?

Sample MLA Formatted Essay

Sample Works Cited

25 October 2019

LESSON: Argumentative Writing

Vocabulary Check

Perception Filter Essay Global Issues Workshop

HW: Revise Drafts (Bring one HARD COPY on Monday)

28 October 2019

LESSON: Perception Filter Essay

Writing Workshop - Peer Reading of LOCAL ISSUES (EDITING)

HW: Revise tonight based on feedback. Submit Essay via turnitin.com by tomorrow’s class.

We will start TPOP tomorrow! (10/29)

Please bring your books to class

  • Sentences beginning with an -ing word need an independent clause (otherwise, they are a fragment)
  • Write your papers in 3rd person, unless first person is used for a narrative voice
    • NO “YOU” / “WE” / “US” / “YOUR”
  • Commas and periods go INSIDE quotation marks
  • No contractions (ctrl + F = ‘)
  • No alot/a lot
  • Search “IS” (ctrl + F = is) - if it is followed by an -ing word, change it do a more direct verb (e.g. is discussing → “discusses”)
  • Incorporate strong, specific verbs (e.g. “uses” → “examines”)
  • Avoid saying “issue”; just identify the specific issue.
  • Avoid words like “big” (e.g. play a big role), “really,” or any other evaluative words when analyzing authors.

Quick Searches

to find errors

29 October 2019

LESSON: The People of Paper

Submit Essays

The Author: S. Plascencia

Taking Notes

Begin Reading

HW: Finish reading the prologue of TPOP

Why? Understanding how to analyze rhetoric rather than just content

makes us more critical readers/thinkers.

“She stepped over her creator, spreading his blood across the polished floor, and then walked out of the factory and into the storm. The print of her arms smeared; her soaked feet tattered as they scraped against wet pavement and turned her toes to pulp” (Plascencia, 15).

124

If I’m writing,

you’re writing.

Take notes!

The People of Paper

A unit on language and rhetoric through the

fictional work of Salvador Plascencia

SALVADOR PLASCENCIA

Salvador Plascencia is a Mexican-American writer and was born in Guadalajara, Mexico on December 21, 1976. At the age of eight, Plascencia and his family moved to El Monte, California.

Plascencia attended Whittier College where he obtained a B.A. in English. He also possesses his MFA (Master of Fine Arts) in fiction from Syracuse University. In 1996, Plascencia was awarded a National Foundation for Advancement of the Arts Award in Fiction and the Peter Neagoe Prize for Fiction in 2000.

Like his character in the novel, Plascencia values his personal privacy, and in early interviews the author feared his parents reading the experimental text,”I don’t want my mom to read it,” he admits. “She’ll think I’m a pervert. There are just some things they shouldn’t know about me.”

As you Read...

As you read the People of paper, look for…

  • Themes that might be attributed to a larger social commentary (you will likely write a research paper on this)
  • Symbolism (various [recurring] images that might be metaphors for or representations of an idea)
  • Relationships
  • Conflicts
  • Rhetoric through fiction (what is he telling based on what he shows us?)

Anticipating the Text

Consider the title.

Who might Salvador Plascencia be referring to? Explain...

How to Take Notes

Look for:

  • Themes/Arguments that might be attributed to a larger social commentary (you will write a research paper on this)
  • Symbolism (various [recurring] images that might be metaphors for or representations of an idea)
  • Relationships
  • Conflicts
  • Rhetoric through fiction (what is he telling his audience based on what he shows us?)

NOTES:

  • Use the document provided for you on the website.
  • ← Look for those things (on the left).
  • Generate a response: you may answer a question, think “aloud” (in writing, really), make connections, discuss the significance, make predictions, etc.

  • While reading, continue to ask this fundamental question: what does this book mean?

30 October 2019

LESSON: The People of Paper

Reading/annotating/discussing Ch.1

HW: Finish reading Ch.1-2

Why? Understanding how to analyze rhetoric rather than just content

makes us more critical readers/thinkers.

130

If I’m writing,

you’re writing.

Take notes!

31 October 2019

LESSON: The People of Paper

TPOP Lesson Sign Ups

Reading Focuses

HW: Finish reading Ch.3-7 by Monday

Why? Understanding how to analyze rhetoric rather than just content

makes us more critical readers/thinkers.

131

Next Vocabulary check: 11/15

WHAT IS MARGINALIZATION?

Marginalization is the process of pushing a particular group or groups of people to the edge of society by not allowing them an active voice, identity, or place in it. Through both direct and indirect processes, marginalized groups may be relegated to a secondary position or made to feel as if they are less important than those who hold more power or privilege in society.

In what ways does Plascencia address the immigrant experience? How about the experience of minority communities?

What about social class?

While reading ch.3, consider Plascencia intentions regarding culture in Rita’s part? What is he saying about culture?

What is the war about? How does this impact how we should approach reading the novel?

At the bottom of 46, plascencia writes, “If only they had . . . just lived their lives without looking up.” What is the broader social suggestion there?

1 & 4 November 2019

LESSON: Rhet. Analysis Practice Assessment

Practice Assessment

Rubric and Self-Assessment

Sample Student Essay

HW: TPOP Ch. 8-10 by Wednesday

Tomorrow we’ll debrief on Ch. 1-7

Why? Understanding how to analyze rhetoric rather than just content

makes us more critical readers/thinkers.

136

Next Vocabulary check: 11/15

5 November 2019

LESSON: The People of Paper

Entrance Ticket

Ch. 1-7 Debrief

HW: TPOP Ch. 8-10 by Wednesday

Tomorrow we’ll debrief on Ch. 1-7

Why? Understanding how to analyze rhetoric rather than just content

makes us more critical readers/thinkers.

137

Next Vocabulary check: 11/15

Entrance Ticket:



Why don’t the characters seem to question the absurdity of a planet watching over them or people that are made of paper? It seems to be simply accepted and never questioned. Why?

WHAT IS MARGINALIZATION?

Marginalization is the process of pushing a particular group or groups of people to the edge of society by not allowing them an active voice, identity, or place in it. Through both direct and indirect processes, marginalized groups may be relegated to a secondary position or made to feel as if they are less important than those who hold more power or privilege in society.

In what ways does Plascencia address the immigrant experience? How about the experience of minority communities?

What about social class?

What does Plascencia suggest about culture in Rita’s part? (Ch. 3)

What is the war about? How does this impact how we should approach reading the novel?

At the bottom of 46, plascencia writes, “If only they had . . . just lived their lives without looking up.” What is the broader social suggestion there?

Pg. 20

Under the column, Saturn, Federico de la Fe is described as depressed, and has bodily reactions to it. As a treatment, he does things to his body. What might be the purpose of this? What might it represent?

Pg. 23

How might we understand this reference to Columbus?

What is the purpose of this?

Pg. 30

What is Saturn?

What does Saturn mean for this text?

What is the significance of limes for Little Merced?

How is it similar to her father?

To paper?

Reading Focuses:

What does Plascencia say about…

  • Gender
  • Power
  • Identity
  • Culture
  • Language

In groups, develop a thesis and point to several (at least 2) sections of the text that speak to the theme Plascencia addresses in the text.

THESIS:

  • What does Plascencia do?
    “Plascecia [does what]...”
  • How does he do it?
    “by…”
  • Why does he do it?
    (What is he trying to get his readers to consider about the world?)
    “In order to…”

6-7 November 2019

LESSON: TPOP ch. 8-10

Characters

Kahoot Review

Discussion Questions

HW: read TPOP Ch. 11-14 by Friday

Why? Thoroughly understand (or at least as much as possible) The People of Paper.

148

Next Vocabulary check: 11/15

TPOP Characters

  • Federico de la Fe
  • Merced
  • Little Merced
  • Froggy el Veterano
  • Smiley
  • Apolonio

  • Don Victoriano
  • Saturn
  • Elizabeth of Helen “Liz”
  • Merced de Papel
  • Ralph and Elisa Landin
  • Margarita “Rita” Hayworth

Kahoot Review

Go to Kahoot.it

https://play.kahoot.it/v2/?quizId=ac72d686-77bc-4eed-b3cc-0c177ffe9590

Students: https://kahoot.it/

Overview

Chapter 8

Smiley goes to find where Saturn lives and talks to him.

Chapter 9

Three POVs:

Saturn - relationship with Liz

Ralph and Elisa Landin - sponsoring Saturn in war

Don Victoriano - life story

Chapter 10

Saturn has a heated conversation with Liz.

Discussion

On page 105 in chapter 8, Smiley enters Plascencia’s house to talk to him, but Plascencia (Saturn) fails to remember who Smiley is. How does this situation correlate with the subversion of authority and transgressing borders?

#1

Discussion

In the beginning of chapter 9, Saturn is warned of the nomadic tendencies of Ticuanenses and Gypsies. How might this reflect cultures? How does it reflect stereotypes?

#2

Discussion

In both chapter 9 (pg. 113) and chapter 10, there is a negative connotation surrounding white people, or more specifically the “white boy” Liz is with. Why might Plascencia draw negative attention to this group, and how does that relate to our society?

#3

Discussion

In chapter 9, Ralph and Elisa Landin agree to sponsor Saturn in the war. Why might they sponsor Saturn and not EMF? How might this relate to our society?

#4

Discussion

In chapter 9, it is revealed that Saturn was also left by his significant other, putting him and Federico de la Fe in similar situations. How do their reactions show the power in which they believe to have?

#5

Discussion/Visual

With your groups, develop a Venn diagram that compares and contrasts Federico de la Fe and Saturn’s attitudes towards their exes leaving them.

#6

Federico de la Fe

Saturn

both

People of Paper (Ch. 11-14)

By Prinz Sabate &

Leianna Kakish

The People of Paper (Ch. 11-14) Group Kahoot Review

  • Partner with a person from outside your group
  • You will be working with your partner to answer the Kahoot questions

Join @ Kahoot.it

Chapter 11-14 Summary

Chapter 12

~ Saturn is mentioning the “innocent” and predictable strategy that Napoleon used in his last battle

Chapter 13

~ Cameroon left Saturn for the beekeeper and explains to him all of Saturn’s lies

Chapter 14

~ Does not state who is speaking, but it is implied to be Liz and how she does not love Saturn anymore

~ Liz requests to be left out of the rest of the novel

Chapter 11

~ Cameroon: New lover/girlfriend of Saturn and their trip; bee stinger addiction

~ Natalia: Runs El Hotel de los Novios with Quinones

~ Jonathan Mead: Desperately trying to get in contact with his daughter

Question #1

In Chapter 11, Jonathan Mead wants to reconcile with the daughter that he has abandoned 16 years ago. Who might Jonathan be specifically trying to get in contact with, and why is he constantly worried on how to talk to her? How might this relate to real-world situations involving adoption?

Question #2

On pages 125-128, Cameroon and Saturn forge a marriage certificate to get a room at El Hotel de los Novios, but it was discovered to be fake later on. What message is Plascencia possibly trying to convey?

Question #3

In the beginning of chapter 9, Cameroon is seen to be addicted to injecting bee stingers into her arms. Why might Cameroon be doing this and why does she hide it from Saturn? How does Cameroon’s addiction relate to our society?

Question #4

In Chapter 11 and 13, Cameroon shows heavy affection towards Saturn but mentions how she wants to leave him, and she was also very quick in leaving him later on for a beekeeper. Why did Cameroon go to the beekeeper and why did she not leave Saturn in the first place?

Question #5

In Chapters 12 and 14, there is a repeated usage of the word “cunt” when Liz and Saturn are speaking. What might the author mean by “cunt” and what might be the purpose of using it?

GROUP DISCUSSION

Discuss with your group: These chapters heavily discuss ideas on feminine symbols (bees, cunt, relationships). How might these ideas reflect the life of Plascencia?

12 November 2019

LESSON: The People of Paper

Gender and Power

Lecture/Analysis

HW: TPOP Ch. 15-17 by Tomorrow

Be prepared for a notes check from Ch. 11

Why? Understanding how to analyze rhetoric rather than just content

makes us more critical readers/thinkers.

167

Next Vocabulary check: 11/15

CH.13-14

Gender and the power of women:

What is Liz charging Saturn of doing?

And how does his one-word response

characterize how women are viewed in this

world? Is it Plascencia’s motive to write

a novel characterizing women this way or is he saying something about that? Explain your answer.

WHAT:

WHY:

HOW:

COLONIALITY:
“The process of active reduction of people, the dehumanization that fits them for the classification, the process of subjectification, the attempt to turn the colonized into less than human beings”

Lugones, María. “Toward a Decolonial Feminism.” Hypatia, 25.4 (2010): 742-759. Print.

What is the role of coloniality in the novel? Is Saturn a colonist?

The People of Paper

Review of chapters 15-17

In chapter 15, on page 154, why do you think Smiley was continuously having murderous dreams relating to Saturn and how do you think this could relate to his authoritative role and how he(smiley) feels about it?

Question 3

In chapter 16, on page 160 it says that Baby Nostradamus is speaking to Little Merced through touching her palm. Why is teaching her how to use her newly found powers and how would this make the audience feel about how Baby Nostradamus uses his power?

Question 4

Question 5

Throughout chapters 15-17, why does Federico De La Fe feel that he has a constant heavy weight on him when Saturn is around?

14 November 2019

LESSON: The People of Paper

Gender and Power

Lecture/Analysis

HW: Vocabulary Check Tomorrow!

TPOP Ch. 18-20 by Tomorrow

Take notes!

Why? Understanding how to analyze rhetoric rather than just content

makes us more critical readers/thinkers.

174

Next Vocabulary check: 11/15

Reading Focuses:

What does Plascencia say about…

  • Gender
  • Power
  • Identity
  • Culture
  • Language

In groups, develop a thesis and point to several (at least 2) sections of the text that speak to the theme Plascencia addresses in the text.

THESIS:

  • What does Plascencia do?
    “Plascecia [does what]...”
  • How does he do it?
    “by…”
  • Why does he do it?
    (What is he trying to get his readers to consider about the world?)
    “In order to…”

The People Of Paper

Chapters 18-20

Taught by Michael Ambeguia and Gracie Naneto

11/15/2019

Overview

Chapter 18

Chapter 19

Chapter 20

  • Baby Nostradamus was baptized at the church of thieves.
  • Revealed that Apolonio is now the legal guardian of the mystical infant.
  • Song called “ The Ballad of Perfidy”

  • Only three stanzas with no actual musical notes.
  • Lead poisoning affects EMF and causes them to take down their lead walls and protection.
  • Little Merced learns that Federico burns himself to cope with the loss of her mother, Merced.
  • Little Merced blocked all of EMF from Saturn’s prying and interference.
  • EMF starts a new strategy to fight Saturn.

Through the social and power lens warmup

  • What does salvador reveal about our society and power in these 3 chapters? Write down your thoughts in the speaker notes and be prepared to share.

Discussion Question #1

Why is Little Merced’s revelation on page 186-187 a pivotal moment in the story? Why is coping used by so many characters in this story and how could this show what the book is trying to reveal about our society and it’s issues?

Discussion Question #2

In chapter 20 how does Saturn’s power diminish and how does the readers power diminish as well? Why does Salvador purposely diminish our power as a reader to an even greater extent in this chapter?

Discussion Question #3

How is Little Merced’s power to block now even more important to EMF in chapter 20? How is Salvador Plascencia portraying women by giving Little Merced such an important role for EMF and El Monte?

The People Of Paper

Chapters 21-24

Vanessa Montelongo and William Logan

Kahoot

Can everyone please take out their computers and go to kahoot.it for a quick quiz on the chapters. :)

Chapter Overview

Chapter 21

193-194

Chapter 22

195-203

Chapter 23

205-206

Chapter 24

208-219

In this chapter, we get a glimpse inside the notebook of Smiley. It has a list of metric conversions from the New Testament as well as the book of Incandescent Light.

In this chapter, it is revealed that Little Merced has passed due to “Citric Poisoning”. Also, Frederico de La Fe reaches out to Merced and informs her of their daughters death. After five days,three hours, and twenty-six minutes, she is resurrected to the shock of everyone.

In this chapter, Frederico de La Fe reconnects with Apolonio and asks if his message to Merced had been received as well as the telegram saying Little merced had been resurrected. As Little Merced rests, Frederico takes care of their lawn.

Within this chapter, saturn reflects on his time with Cameroon. Also, Little Merced begins to practice her newfound gift of blocking out words of the story. Also, in preparations for the final battle, “everyone” arrives in El Monte, from the lettuce pickers to Jonathan Mead.

Analysis Question #1:

Throughout Chapter 22, the people of EMF are grieving over the death of Little Merced. How is this similar to the feeling that has been expressed throughout the book by Saturn?

Analysis Question #2:

Within chapter 22, Why is it so important to the success of the war for Federico de La Fe and EMF that Little Merced is resurrected? How does this hurt Saturn?

Analysis Question #3:

In your opinions, who has the most impact on the people of that town. Who is the most important character of these chapters and why? Don’t be afraid to be bold with your answers.

19 November 2019

LESSON: The People of Paper

Thesis Statements

Gender and Power

Lecture/Analysis

HW: TPOP Ch. 25-27 due Thursday

TPOP Notes due Friday in class

Why? Understanding how to analyze rhetoric rather than just content

makes us more critical readers/thinkers.

188

Next Vocabulary check: 12/6

Reading Focuses:

What does Plascencia say about…

  • Gender
  • Power
  • Identity
  • Culture
  • Language

In groups, develop a thesis and point to several (at least 2) sections of the text that speak to the theme Plascencia addresses in the text.

THESIS:

  • What does Plascencia do?
    “Plascecia [does what]...”
  • How does he do it?
    “by…”
  • Why does he do it?
    (What is he trying to get his readers to consider about the world?)
    “In order to…”

Merced de

Papel

“Her history was on the lips of her lovers, the scars that parted their mouths. But that was the history of Merced de Papel the lover, the loved one, the history of pain of touching her. Merced de Papel was cautious of a legacy left in scar tissue, and for this reason she kept her own account, written on the scraps that she shed.” (198)

Who is Merced de Papel, really?

Merced de

Papel

“But when Merced de Papel Dissolved from paper to strings of fiber and Pulp it was not the mild-mannered and short- tongued men who mourned her most, but those with the scarred and long tongues. People who very early in her life had been trained for Mariachis bands...” (201)

If Merced de Papel had an “affinity for white lovers” (200), what is Plascencia saying about them?

Ch.24

WAR

How is the reader also a part of this war? Whose side does Plascencia put them on?

What does Saturn need to win the war?

Consider Pg. 212: “Saturn violated the most important tenet of war: allowing love to enter his mind”

Why does this story take place in El Monte? (Consider Pelon’s column on p.213)

20 November 2019

LESSON: The People of Paper

Power & Love Lens

Discussion/Analysis

Written analysis (due tomorrow in class)

HW: Finish analysis (Anzuldua/Plascencia)

TPOP Ch. 25-27 due Thursday

TPOP Notes due Friday in class

Why? Understanding how to analyze rhetoric rather than just content

makes us more critical readers/thinkers.

193

Next Vocabulary check: 12/6

Ch.24

WAR

On p.214 Saturn’s column moves. Consider what he says. What is he trying to be?

Who is really moving him? ----------

-----------------------------

The Also consider what Subcomandante Sandra says on p.216

Ch.24

WAR

“But I forgot what the world was before--if the world is not about diameter of piping and size of sprinkler heads, if the world is not about flowers, I don’t know anything else.

They had ordered me to think only in one way, to look at everything as a catalog of inconsequential items, and now they say that I may look further, that I may see beyond the furrows and the working flower trade”

  • Pelon (213)

WHO IS “THEY” and how does pelon signify a larger social issue about the marginalized?

“Because change, positive and negative, is always a source of tension, because it has no sense of closure, of completion, we resist it. We must be motivated by love in order to undertake change”

  • Gloria Anzuldua

Applying theory to literature:

What is Anzuldua saying here? How might it be applied to TPOP ?

Anzuldua contends that

Considering Anzuldua within the context of Plascencia’s plot/characters/[some other element] leads to [what understanding].

[Provide textual support.]

[Analyze this aspects of the story from Anzuldua’s perespective.]

Anzuldua contends that

Considering Anzuldua within the context of Plascencia’s plot/characters/[some other element] leads to [what understanding].

[Provide textual support.]

[Analyze this aspects of the story from Anzuldua’s perespective.]

AP Lang/Comp Daily Agenda (Fall 2019) - Google Slides