Getting your school going with the

Digital Technologies Curriculum

In this session:

> Unpacking the Digital Technologies Curriculum

> Best practices towards an integrated approach

> Resources and practical examples for embedding the curriculum into teaching & learning

Anthony Speranza

(ICT Learning & Teaching Leader / Educational Consultant)

T: @anthsperanza

B: anthsperanza.com

G: +AnthonySperanza

Access these slides from:

bit.ly/speranzadtc

Use #ACUedu_p

on twitter

Where are you?

1

5

There’s a Digital Technologies Curriculum?

The DTC is alive and well in our school, integrated across various curriculum areas.

What is it?

Digital Technologies is the study of how the application of information systems, and computational, design and systems thinking enable the creation of purpose designed digital solutions to meet current and future needs.

It is not a new name for eLearning or ICT.

Rather, they are subject areas which allow students to discover how and why systems work.

Key points

  • A NEW curriculum (F-10)
  • NOT a replacement for ICT
  • A significant part of the curriculum can be learned in “unplugged” modes
  • Implemented by end of 2017

Strong emphasis on…

Designing Solutions Computational Thinking

Computer Programming Binary and Logical Language

Robotics STE(A)M

Systems Data

What is it?

Digital Technologies Curriculum

See in particular:

Components of the Technologies Curriculum

Design and Technologies F - 10 Digital Technologies F - 10

Components of the Technologies Curriculum

Systems Thinking

Design Thinking

Computational Thinking

Generating ideas for development.

Evaluating ideas based on criteria.

Conceiving opportunities for new solutions.

Seeing connections between solutions, systems and society.

Identifying components of systems.

Identifying intended and unintended outputs of a system.

Modelling aspects of solutions.

Sequencing steps and decisions (algorithms).

Deconstructing problems into their component parts.

Digital Technologies F - 10

Knowledge and understanding

Digital systems - the components of digital systems: hardware, software and networks and their use

Representation of data - how data are represented and structured symbolically

Processes and production skills

Collecting, managing and analysing data

Creating digital solutions by:

  • defining
  • designing
  • implementing
  • evaluating
  • collaborating and managing

ICT in the (Australian) Curriculum

ICT is addressed in the curriculum in two ways:

  • ICT Capability
  • Digital Technologies

The capability assists students to become effective users of ICT.

The Digital Technologies curriculum assists students to become confident creators of digital solutions.

Mitchel Resnick:

“... most young people learn only to USE digital media, not to CREATE with digital media. It is as if they can ‘read’ but not ‘write’. They are not truly fluent with digital media. They browse websites but can't create their own. They play games, but can't create their own. They interact with simulations, but can't create their own.”

Mitchel Resnick, Massechussets Institute of Technology (MIT) Media Lab, developed the Scratch programming language and online community and programmable bricks used in LEGO Mindstorms. Young people (ages 8 and up) have shared more than 4.5 million projects on the Scratch website.

The challenges

that excite

or

terrify teachers

Binary Numbers

“In mathematics and digital electronics, a binary number is a number expressed in the binary numeral system or base-2 numeral system which represents numeric values using two different symbols: typically 0 (zero) and 1 (one). The base-2 system is a positional notation with a radix of 2.”

Computational Thinking

“Computational thinking is a problem-solving method that is applied to create solutions that can be implemented using digital technologies. It involves integrating strategies, such as organising data logically, breaking down problems into parts, interpreting patterns and models and designing and implementing algorithms.”

Algorithms (and coding!)

3 - 7 - 9 - 1

The step-by-step procedures required to solve a problem. For example, to find the largest number in a list of positive numbers:

  • Note the first number as the largest.

  • Look through the remaining numbers, in turn, and if a number is larger than the number found in 1, note it as the largest.

  • Repeat this process until complete. The last noted number is the largest in the list.

Algorithms may be described in many ways. Flowcharts are often useful in visualising an algorithm.

Representation of data (infographic via vgrinteractive.com.au)

TPACK

- Koehler &

Mishra (2009)

Representation of data

Algorithms (and coding!)

Computational Thinking

Coding Software

Electronics

Hardware-makey makey

Gadgets

Peer teaching

Makerspaces

Autonomy

SAMR - Puentedura (2014)

“Everybody should learn how to program a computer…

because it teaches you how to think.

- Steve Jobs

Mitch Resnick

Let's teach kids to code

link

What affirms your beliefs?

What challenges your thinking?

What are the questions or ideas?

Digital disruption in the Australian economy means that tasks that use and produce ICT are becoming increasingly embedded into the jobs of workers outside the ICT profession. As such, ICT skills will be critical in supporting innovation and productivity growth in the future.

- ACS, Australia’s Digital Pulse, June 2015

Computer Science is Changing Everything

4 Corners - Future Proof

Crowded curriculum?

Level

Expected hours

F- 2

30

3 - 4

40

5 - 6

60

7 - 8

80

9 - 10

80

REMEMBER:

Not a replacement for ICT!

CS + <X>

DigiTech

Coding and Computational Thinking

ICT

Creating and Making

English

Exposition

CCP

Sustainability

Advertisement

Create a 30 second advertisement in Scratch, persuading the audience to recycle more often.

Science

Environment

CS + <X>

DigiTech

Algorithms and Computational Thinking

English

Procedure

Maths

Number, mass and measurement

Recipe

Analyse a recipe from MasterChef and develop a set of plain-english instructions

CS Unplugged

Eg: http://csunplugged.org/sorting-algorithms/

Bubble sorting - Hungarian folk dance

CSER MOOC

Lending Library

Professional Learning Program

For more info, speak to Celia Coffa (Project Officer VIC)

E : celia.coffa@adelaide.edu.au

W: http://csermoocs.adelaide.edu.au/

CS First

CS First is a free program that increases student access and exposure to computer science (CS) education. Our materials:

  • are completely free and available online
  • are targeted at students aged 9-14
  • can be tailored to fit your schedule and needs
  • involve block-based coding using Scratch and are themed to attract students with varied interests

See my CS First presentation and Scratch workshop on my blog.

Digital Careers

BEBRAS Computational Thinking Challenge

Our school students participating in the challenge

See the solutions guide for examples of problems, answers and teaching points

Code The Future

Code Club Australia

CODE.ORG

Google for Education - Exploring Computational Thinking

google.com/edu/computational-thinking/resources.html

(Solving problems at Google using Computational Thinking)

Careers With Code ebook

refractionmedia.com.au/careerswithcode/

Also available on Google Play and Apple iTunes

DigiPubs

Digital Technologies Hub

Other Resources

Software and platforms

Hardware

Linda Liukas

A delightful way to teach kids about computers

Link & helloruby.com

What affirms your beliefs?

What challenges your thinking?

What are the questions or ideas?

Other useful resources

3D Printing & Design

Lessons learnt so far:

goo.gl/Fflxrn

Teaching

Computational Thinking and Coding with Scratch

Getting your school going with the

Digital Technologies Curriculum

In this session:

> Unpacking the Digital Technologies Curriculum

> Best practices towards an integrated approach

> Resources and practical examples for embedding the curriculum into teaching & learning

Anthony Speranza

(ICT Learning & Teaching Leader / Educational Consultant)

T: @anthsperanza

B: anthsperanza.com

G: +AnthonySperanza

Access these slides from:

bit.ly/speranzadtc

APPENDIX

Credit: Paula Christophersen, Curriculum Manager Digital Technologies

Credit: Paula Christophersen, Curriculum Manager Digital Technologies

Credit: Paula Christophersen, Curriculum Manager Digital Technologies

Credit: Paula Christophersen, Curriculum Manager Digital Technologies

Credit: Paula Christophersen, Curriculum Manager Digital Technologies

F-2 Band Description (VC)

In Foundation to Level 2, students are introduced to common digital systems and patterns that exist within data they collect. Students organise, manipulate and present this data, including numerical, categorical, text, image, audio and video data, in creative ways to create meaning.

Students use the concept of abstraction when defining problems, to identify the most important information. They begin to develop their design thinking skills by conceptualising algorithms as a sequence of steps for carrying out instructions, such as identifying steps in a process or controlling robotic devices. Students describe how information systems meet information, communication and recreation needs.

Through discussion with teachers, students learn to apply safe practices to protect themselves and others as they interact online for learning and communicating.

Across the band, students will have had the opportunity to create a range of digital solutions through guided play and integrated learning, such as using robotic toys to navigate a map or recording science data with software applications.

F-2 Achievement Standard (VC) - Click here to see portfolio of student work (AC)

By the end of Level 2, students identify how common digital systems are used to meet specific purposes.

Students use digital systems to represent simple patterns in data in different ways and collect familiar data and display them to convey meaning.

Students design solutions to simple problems using a sequence of steps and decisions. They create and organise ideas and information using information systems and share these in safe online environments.

3-4 Band Description (VC)

In Levels 3 and 4, students explore digital systems in terms of their components and peripheral devices such as digital microscopes, cameras and interactive whiteboards. They collect, manipulate and interpret data, developing an understanding of the characteristics of data and their representation.

Students further develop their computational thinking skills using the concept of abstraction to analyse simple problems and use techniques such as summarising facts to deduce conclusions. They record simple solutions to problems through text and diagrams and develop their designing skills. They initially follow prepared algorithms, and progress to describing their own that support branching (choice of options) and user input. Their solutions are developed using appropriate software including visual programming languages that use graphical elements rather than text instructions.

With teacher guidance, students identify and list the major steps needed to complete a task or project. When sharing ideas and communicating in online environments they develop an understanding of why it is important to consider the feelings of their audiences and apply safe practices and agreed social protocols that demonstrate respectful behaviour.

Across the band, students will have had opportunities to create a range of digital solutions, such as interactive adventures that involve user choice, modelling simplified real-world systems and simple guessing games.

3-4 Achievement Standard (VC) - Click here to see portfolio of student work (AC)

By the end of Level 4, students describe how a range of digital systems and their peripheral devices can be used for different purposes.

Students explain how the same data sets can be represented in different ways. They collect and manipulate different data when creating information and digital solutions. They plan and safely use information systems when creating and communicating ideas and information, applying agreed protocols.

Students define simple problems, and design and develop digital solutions using algorithms that involve decision-making and user input. They explain how their developed solutions and existing information systems meet their purposes.

5-6 Band Description (VC)

In Levels 5 and 6, students develop an understanding of the role individual components of digital systems play in the processing and representation of data. They acquire, validate, interpret, track and manage various types of data and are introduced to the concept of data states in digital systems and how data are transferred between systems.

They learn to develop abstractions further by identifying common elements across similar problems and systems and to develop an understanding of the relationship between models and the real-world systems they represent.

When creating solutions, students analyse problems clearly by defining appropriate data and requirements. When designing, they consider how users will interact with the solutions, and check and validate their designs to increase the likelihood of creating working solutions. Students increase the sophistication of their algorithms by identifying repetition and incorporate repeat instructions or structures when developing their solutions through visual programming, such as reading user input until an answer is guessed correctly in a quiz. They evaluate their solutions and examine the sustainability of their own solutions and existing information systems.

Students progress from managing the creation of their own ideas and information for sharing to working collaboratively. In doing so, they learn to negotiate and develop plans to complete tasks. When engaging with others, they take personal and physical safety into account, applying social and ethical protocols that acknowledge factors such as social differences and privacy of personal information. They also develop their skills in applying technical protocols such as devising file naming conventions that are meaningful and determining safe storage locations to protect data and information.

Across the band, students will have had opportunities to create a range of digital solutions, such as games or quizzes and interactive stories and animations.

5-6 Achievement Standard (VC) - Click here to see portfolio of student work (AC)

By the end of Level 6, students explain the functions of digital system components and how digital systems are connected to form networks that transmit data.

Students explain how digital systems use whole numbers as a basis for representing a variety of data types. They manage the creation and communication of ideas, information and digital projects collaboratively using validated data and agreed protocols.

Students define problems in terms of data and functional requirements and design solutions by developing algorithms to address the problems. They incorporate decision-making, repetition and user interface design into their designs and develop their digital solutions, including a visual program. Students explain how information systems and their developed solutions meet current and future needs taking sustainability into account.

Planning Templates

Curriculum

Inquiry planner (immersion)

> To design immersion around rich

questions

> Click to make a copy

DTC opportunity design

> To audit current progress,

and map future direction

> Click to make a copy of F-2, 3-4, 5-6

DTC within KLAs

> To map other units of work

Against DTC

> Click to make a copy

Resources, activities and lesson plans

Planning

Read the

  • Band Descriptors
  • Achievement Standards
  • Content Descriptions

1) Audit what you have already completed this year.

2) Think about what could be achieved under Inquiry

3) Think about what remains, and how this could be covered

Think CS+X, eg:

  • Programming and Visual Art
  • Algorithms and Procedural texts
  • Representation of Data and Statistics (maths)

Bloom’s Taxonomy: Teacher Planning Kit (link)

Getting your school going with the DTC - anthsperanza.com - Google Slides