2019-2020
REQUIRED TRAINING

CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT:
RECOGNITION AND REPORTING
AND
CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE :
AWARENESS AND REPORTING

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An On-Line

Professional Development Course

Offered By

Bartlesville Public Schools

For

Bartlesville Public School Employees

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Course Credit

At the end of this training Bartlesville Public School employees may access a quiz to document participation in one contact hour of training for the period August 1, 2019 through May 22, 2020.

  • Please keep a copy of your certificate for your own records.
  • Your principal will receive electronic notification when you have completed this online training related to Child Abuse.
  • Do Not send a copy of your participation certificate to the ESC.

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Why Report Child Abuse

It’s the law in Oklahoma.

10A O.S. §§ 1-2-101, B1 and 2018’s HB 2259:

Every person having reason to believe that a child under the age of eighteen years is a victim of abuse or neglect shall report the matter IMMEDIATELY to the Department of Human Services (DHS).

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Why Report Child Abuse

It’s the law in Oklahoma.

10A O.S. §§ 1-2-101, B1 and 2018’s HB 2259:

Every teacher having reason to believe that a student 18 years or older is a victim of abuse or neglect must report the matter IMMEDIATELY to local law enforcement.

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Who Must Report Child Abuse

Mandatory reporting of child abuse is required of every person, both private citizens and education professionals, including:

    • Certified teachers
    • Certified principals
    • Certified administrators
    • Classified teacher assistants
    • Other school employees

who have reason to believe a child has been abused or neglected or is in danger of being abused.

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Who Must Report Child Abuse

  • Making a child abuse report is an INDIVIDUAL responsibility.
  • A person making a report, in good faith, is immune from civil or criminal liability.
  • The name of the reporter is kept confidential by DHS.
  • Failure to report promptly is a misdemeanor.

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Who Must Report Child Abuse

  • Reporting suspected child abuse and neglect to an administrator, principal, director or supervisor BEFORE you file a suspected child abuse report with DHS is a violation of the law and may be a misdemeanor.
  • Bartlesville Public Schools DOES NOT require any employee to tell their supervisor that a report of suspected child abuse has been filed with DHS.

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When to Report Child Abuse

A report should be made EACH TIME there is REASONABLE CAUSE to believe that a child has been abused or neglected or is in danger of being abused or neglected.

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How to Report Suspected Abuse

CALL

24-Hour Statewide Child Abuse Hotline

1-800-522-3511

CALL or VISIT

Bartlesville Field Operations Office

Oklahoma Department of Human Services

5205 Jacquelyn Lane, 74006

Office Hours – 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

918-338-5700 or 1-800-734-7512

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What to Report

  • Name of the student
  • Gender of the student
  • Age of the student
  • Address of the student, if known
  • Current location of student, if known
  • Name(s), address, place(s) of employment, and phone number(s) of the adult(s) responsible for the student’s safety, health and welfare
  • Factual description of student’s injuries

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What to Report

  • A form is available on the district website at BPSTRAINING.ORG to help you organize the information you will need to make a child abuse report. Link to Reporting Child Abuse Form:

https://docs.google.com/a/bps-ok.org/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=YnBzLW9rLm9yZ3x3ZWJzaXRlfGd4OjJjNDMxYjgyNzNmZjg5NTU

  • Personal opinions and inferences SHOULD NOT be included in the report.
  • When you make a report of suspected child abuse or neglect to DHS, your responsibility is FINISHED.

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Suspected Abuse Report

  • It is the responsibility of individual teachers, principals, administrators and other school employees to REPORT suspected child abuse.
  • It is the responsibility of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services (DHS) to ASSESS, INVESTIGATE, CONFIRM and ACT UPON the report.

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Child Abuse Definition

Child abuse is harm or threatened harm to a child’s health, safety or welfare by a person responsible for the child. This includes non-accidental physical injury mental maltreatment, sexual abuse or neglect.

10A O.S. §§ 1-1-101

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Child Abuse

Child abuse is typically a pattern of behavior that is repeated over time but can also be a single incident.

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Child Abuse

Child abuse occurs when a parent, legal guardian, foster parent or other caregiver:

    • Injures or causes a child to be injured, tortured or maimed
    • Uses unreasonable force on a child
    • Uses unnecessary harsh discipline
    • Uses punishment that is too severe
    • Engages in or allows a third party to engage in sexual exploitation of a child under the age of 18 years.

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Categories of Child Abuse

There are five categories of reportable child abuse:

    • Neglect
    • Abandonment
    • Physical Abuse
    • Sexual Abuse
    • Emotional Abuse

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Neglect occurs when a

    • parent,
    • legal guardian,
    • foster parent, or
    • other caregiver

fails to provide

    • adequate food,
    • appropriate clothing,
    • safe shelter,
    • adequate medical care,
    • protection, and
    • supervision or
    • special physical or mental needs care when indicated

to a child, birth to 18 years of age.

Neglect

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Neglect

  • Neglect is the most common form of maltreatment.
  • Neglect is the failure to provide for a child’s basic needs such as adequate food, clean clothing appropriate for the season and weather conditions, shelter that is clean with adequate utilities, timely medical care, opportunity to attend school and age-appropriate supervision.

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Neglect

  • Indicators that may be observed in the school setting:
    • Student consistently arrives at school hungry; asks to take food home or digs through food disposal containers.
    • Student has poor hygiene, matted hair, dirty skin or bad body odor.
    • Student has untreated or frequent reoccurrence of head lice

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Neglect

    • Student is frequently tardy or absent.
    • Student frequently falls asleep in class, exhibits chronic fatigue, or is listless and unfocused during instruction time.
    • Student has frequent colds and other medical needs that are not addressed by a healthcare provider.
    • Student is often dropped off early at school and left without supervision or picked up late.

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Neglect

  • Caregiver behaviors that may indicate child neglect and may be observed in the school setting:
    • Caregiver (parent, legal guardian, foster parent, child care provider) consistently fails to keep appointments with teachers or principal.
    • Caregiver seems to be unengaged in and unsupportive of student’s learning activities.
    • Caregiver appears to have a health issue, developmental disability or drug problems that interfere with the ability to provide basic needs for the student.

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Abandonment

Abandonment may occur when a parent, guardian or caregiver

    • gives a child away
    • leaves a child and does not return
    • leaves a child unattended for long periods of time
    • forces a child to leave the home

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Abandonment

  • Is an extreme type of neglect.
  • Indicators that may be observed in the school setting:
    • Student wears the same clothing for many days.
    • Older student may miss several days or drop out of school to care for younger siblings.
    • Student may tell someone they are being left alone for extended periods of time.

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Abandonment

    • Student may appear extremely anxious toward the end of the school day.
    • Student is evasive when asked about caregiver.
  • Caregiver behaviors that may indicate child abandonment and may be observed in the school setting:
    • Extreme efforts to communicate with the caregiver are unsuccessful.

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Physical abuse is non-accidental, intentional physical injury to a child under the age of 18 by a parent, legal guardian, foster parent or other caregiver.

Physical Abuse

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Physical Abuse

May Include:

  • Beatings
  • Shaking
  • Burns
  • Human bites
  • Strangulation
  • Immersion in scalding water

Resulting In:

  • Bruises, welts and broken bones
  • Internal injuries
  • Blisters and scars
  • Broken skin and bruises
  • Unconsciousness and marks on neck
  • Severe burns, blisters and loss of skin

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Myths about Physical Abuse

  • The majority of caregivers who abuse children are mentally ill.
  • Physical abuse only occurs in lower socioeconomic families.
  • Young children have frequent accidents that result in broken bones.
  • A physicians report is needed before a physical abuse report can be made.

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Myths about Physical Abuse

  • Only children under 16 years of age can be reported as physically abused.
  • Children who are being abused will ask for help.

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Facts about Physical Abuse

  • Fewer than ten percent of abusive caregivers have a mental disorder.
  • Reports of physical abuse have been confirmed in all socioeconomic levels.
  • Many broken bones in children under the age of two are from intentional injury.
  • Proof of injury is not necessary to make a request for a child abuse investigation.

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Facts about Physical Abuse

  • Physical abuse of any child under age eighteen should be reported.
  • Children are usually too afraid to talk about their injuries or too small to ask for help.

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Physical Abuse

  • Physical Indicators that may be observed in the school setting:
    • Unexplained bruises and welts on the face torso, back or thighs.
    • Bruises, welts, burns and lacerations in various stages of healing.
    • Unexplained burns on the palms of hands, soles of feet and back.

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Physical Abuse

  • Behavioral indicators that may be observed in the school setting:
    • Student may back away or duck when approached by an adult.
    • Student becomes anxious near the end of the school day.
    • Student asks to stay at school.
    • Student is overly shy.
    • Student avoids contact with adults.

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Physical Abuse

  • Caregiver behaviors that may indicate physical abuse of a child and may be observed in the school setting:
    • Caregiver offers illogical or contradictory explanation of student’s injuries.
    • Caregiver attempts to conceal student’s injuries.
    • Caregiver has unrealistic expectations of student.

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Sexual abuse means any sexual activity or propositioning between an adult and a child for the purpose of sexually stimulating the adult, the child or others.

Sexual abuse may be committed by a parent, step-parent, grandparent, sibling, cousin, other family member or friend.

Sexual Abuse

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Sexual Abuse May Include

    • Sexually explicit jokes
    • Unwanted sexual touching
    • Catcalling or unwanted sexual comments
    • Pressure to engage in sexual acts
    • Sending unwanted sexual photographs or images
    • Taking sexual photos or videos without consent
    • Unwanted requests for sexual favors
    • Pressure to provide sexual photos or videos
    • Unwelcome sexual advances
    • Sexual assault

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Sexual Abuse May Include

    • Rape
    • Sodomy
    • Incest
    • Lewd or indecent acts or proposals
    • Prostitution and sexual trafficking
    • Obscene photography
    • Deliberate exposure to adult pornography or adult sex acts
    • Intentional engagement of a child under age 18 in an adult sex act

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Scope of Sexual Abuse

  • Approximately 1,700* cases of child sexual abuse are confirmed in Oklahoma each year.
  • Current research indicates that one in four girls and one in seven boys will be sexually abused by the age of eighteen.

  • *Source – DHS Annual Report

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Scope of Sexual Abuse

  • Child sexual abuse is typically an ongoing relationship that takes place over several years.
  • Verbal threats, coercion and gifts are frequently used to force children to participate and keep the abuse a secret.

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Myths about Sexual Abuse

  • Sex offenders can be easily identified.
  • Most sexual abuse victims are teenagers.
  • Children often lie about being sexually abused.
  • Incest offenders only molest children in their own families.
  • Lack of physical violence means child is a willing participant.
  • Sex offenders have mental health issues or cognitive disorders.

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Facts about Sexual Abuse

  • The majority of sex offenders are known to the child.
  • Over 1/3 of sex abuse victims are five years old or younger.
  • Children lack the experience and vocabulary to accurately describe adult sexual activity.
  • Incest offenders often molest children outside their families.
  • Many sex offenders appear to be responsible and respectable citizens.

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Sexual Abuse

  • Indicators that may be observed in the school setting:
    • Sexual knowledge or behavior beyond that expected for the child’s developmental level.
    • Fearful of or anxious around adults
    • Frequent headaches, backaches and stomach aches.
    • Avoidance of dressing for gym class or wearing extra layers of clothing.
    • Decline in school performance and participation in school activities.

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Sexual Abuse

  • Caregiver behaviors that may indicate sexual abuse of a child and may be observed in the school setting:
    • Caregiver is extremely protective of student especially during physical activities.
    • Caregiver limits time student is at school, picking them up early and dropping them off late.

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Emotional abuse is injury to a child’s psychological growth and development that diminishes the sense of identity, dignity and self-worth.

Emotional Abuse

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Emotional Abuse

  • Just because emotional abuse does not leave a physical mark does not mean the abuse is not real and hurtful.
  • Emotional abuse often occurs when a caregiver has not developed appropriate personal coping skills and adequate parenting skills.
  • Emotional abuse often manifests as chronic verbal aggression.

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Emotional Abuse May Include:

    • Confinement
    • Isolation
    • Verbal assault
    • Humiliation
    • Intimidation
    • Rejection
    • Criticism
    • Exploitation and corruption
    • Denial of emotional responsiveness

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Emotional Abuse

  • Indicators that may be observed in the school setting:
    • Student lags in physical, social and emotional development.
    • Older students may exhibit sucking, biting and rocking behaviors not related to a mental or physical development disorder.
    • Student may exhibit behavioral extremes: compliant, passive, demanding, antisocial, destructive, overly needy.
    • Student may be self-destructive, cutting, attempting suicide.

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Emotional Abuse

  • Caregiver behaviors that may indicate emotional abuse of a child and may be observed in the school setting:
    • Caregiver has impossible expectations or makes unreasonable demands of student.
    • Caregiver seems unconcerned about student’s problems.
    • Caregiver treats student with disrespect.
    • Caregiver blames student for caregiver’s mistakes.

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When an Abused Student Tells

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When an Abused Student Tells

  • There may be times when an abused student may tell you directly or indirectly about abuse in their family.
  • It is difficult for students to talk about their abuse, especially when they think it will get them or their family into trouble.
  • It is important for school employees to handle their disclosure with sensitivity.

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When an Abused Student Tells

    • Provide a private time and place to listen to the student.
    • Reassure the student that they have done the right thing by telling you.
    • Inform the student that you are required by law to report the abuse.
    • Do not express shock or criticize the family.
    • Use the student’s vocabulary to discuss the abuse.

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When an Abused Student Tells

  • Reassure the student that the abuse is not their fault; they are not bad or to blame.
  • Determine their immediate need for safety.
  • Let the student know what will happen when you report.

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Guidance from Oklahoma State Department of Education
Spring 2017

Mandatory Duty to Report All Allegations of Child Abuse or Neglect

Recently, several students’ allegations of inappropriate conduct by a school employee were not properly reported to authorities, all Bartlesville Public School employees should review the following information:

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Mandatory Duty to Report

Under Oklahoma statute 10A O.S. § 1-2-101, Duty to Report Abuse or Neglect of Child Under Eighteen, Every person having reason to believe that a child under the age of eighteen (18) years is a victim of abuse or neglect shall report the matter immediately to the Department of Human Services. The statute provides for criminal charges if an individual fails to report the suspected abuse or neglect of a minor. If a student tells you that an adult has touched or communicated with them inappropriately, you have a legal obligation to immediately report the allegation to the DHS Child Abuse and Neglect Hotline at 1-800-522-3511.

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Mandatory Duty to Report

It is against the law to delay reporting to DHS while you investigate a student’s allegation of inappropriate contact. Every allegation of child abuse or neglect, including any inappropriate touching or communications, must be immediately reported to DHS. Even if you do not believe the student, you must report the allegation to the hotline. Failure to immediately report to DHS may subject you to criminal penalties, and any delay may expose the student or others to further harm. 

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Mandatory Duty to Report

Any student allegation of abuse or neglect, including inappropriate touching or communications, must be reported to the DHS Child Abuse and Neglect Hotline (1-800-522-3511). Even if you contact local law enforcement about a student’s allegations of abuse, you must also call the Child Abuse and Neglect Hotline to make a report to DHS.   

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Mandatory Duty to Report

Under 70 O.S. § 1210.162, Each public school shall post in a clearly visible location in a public area of the school that is readily accessible to students a sign in English and Spanish that contains the toll-free number operated by the Department of Human Services…to receive reports of child abuse or neglect.ˮ Sample signs in English and Spanish are available on the State Department of Education website at: http://sde.ok.gov/sde/documents/2016-08-22/child-abuse-neglect-hotline-posters.

  

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Fact

In SFY-2013 Oklahoma DHS received over 70,000 reports of suspected child abuse and neglect involving 128,024 children.

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Fact

In SFY-2013 Oklahoma DHS substantiated more than 6,000 reports of child abuse and neglect involving 11,419 children.

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Resources

Lisa Foreman, B.S.N., R.N. 

District School Nurse

E-mail – ForemanLE@bps-ok.org

918-336-3311 ext. 1035

Check with Nurse Lisa if you have questions or need information about recognizing and reporting suspected child abuse and neglect or suspected child sexual abuse.

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Resources

Check with your school counselor or

Jason Langham, Executive Director of Secondary and

Special Services

E-mail – LanghamRJ@bps-ok.org 918-336-8600 ext. 3515

if you have questions or need information about

recognizing and reporting child abuse and neglect,

or the steps to take to report child sexual abuse.

Questions may also be directed to Kerry Ickleberry,

BPS Safe & Healthy Schools Coordinator

E-mail- IckleberryKG@bps-ok.org 918-336-3311 ext. 1196

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Resources

24-Hour Statewide Child Abuse Hotline

1-800-522-3511

Oklahoma State Department of Human Services

http://www.okdhs.org

Bartlesville Field Operations Office

Oklahoma Department of Human Services

5205 Jacquelyn Lane, 74006

Office Hours – 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

918-338-5700 or 1-800-734-7512

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You have completed the study portion of the

2019-2020
Child Abuse: Recognition and Reporting/

Child Sexual Abuse : Awareness and Reporting

On-Line Professional Development Course

To receive professional development credit and confirm participation

click the link below to access the Child Abuse/Child Sexual Abuse Training Quiz

Click here for help if you have trouble accessing the form

After completing the quiz, you’ll receive an email with the results for your review and should receive a second one with your certificate you can file in Google Drive. Please do NOT send your certificate to the ESC or your site; we will have an electronic record of your completion on file.

If you have questions about this training, please contact:

Kelli Bryant, Teacher Specialist of Student Accountability and Assessments

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2019-2020 Child Abuse Training - Google Slides