Human Impact on Local Water Resources:
An NGSS-Aligned High School Unit

Developed for the Teacher Professional Learning (TPL) Workshop:

A collaboration between the Natural Resources and Education Departments at the

University of Connecticut


NEAG SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

Presentation Overview

  • Brief Overview/Introduction of Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)
  • Three-Dimensional Learning as Sensemaking
  • Initial Modeling Lesson

NEAG SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

Framework and NGSS

The Framework for K-12 Science Education formed the basis for development of the Next Generation Science Standards.

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Three Dimensions of Science Learning Outlined in NRC Framework/Used to Frame NGSS

Science & Engineering Practices (SEPs)

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Berland (2011) describes practices as the habits of mind and processes undertaken by communities of scientists as they work to develop explanations and arguments for explaining natural phenomena and/or leverage science for making informed decisions as citizens.

Berland (2011) describes practices as the habits of mind and processes undertaken by communities of scientists as they work to develop explanations and arguments for explaining natural phenomena and/or leverage science for making informed decisions as citizens.

11) describes practices as the habits of mind and processes undertaken by communities of scientists as they work to develop explanations and arguments for explaining natural phenomena and/or leverage science for making informed decisions as citizens.

Berland (2011) describes practices as the habits of mind and processes undertaken by communities of scientists as they work to develop explanations and arguments for explaining natural phenomena and/or leverage science for making informed decisions as citizens.

Berland (2011) describes practices as the habits of mind and processes undertaken by communities of scientists as they work to develop explanations and arguments for explaining natural phenomena and/or leverage science for making informed decisions as citizens.

Berland (2011) describes practices as the habits of mind and processes undertaken by communities of scientists as they work to develop explanations and arguments for explaining natural phenomena and/or leverage science for making informed decisions as citizens.

Berland (2011) describes practices as the habits of mind and processes undertaken by communities of scientists as they work to develop explanations and arguments for explaining natural phenomena and/or leverage science for making informed decisions as citizens.

Crosscutting Concepts (CCCs)

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CCCCs provide students with connections and intellectual tools that are related across the differing areas of disciplinary content and can enrich their application of practices and their understanding of core ideas. — Framework p. 233

Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCIs)


Earth Science  - ESS3.C: Human Impacts on Earth Systems

  • The sustainability of human societies and the biodiversity that supports them requires responsible management of natural resources.

  • Scientists and engineers can make major contributions by developing technologies that produce less pollution and waste and that preclude ecosystem degradation.

Disciplinary Core Ideas:
Have broad importance across multiple science or engineering disciplines or is a key organizing concept of a single discipline
Provide key tools for understanding or investigating more complex ideas and solving problems
Relate to the interests and life experiences of students or can be connected to societal or personal concerns that require scientific or technical knowledge
Are teachable and learnable over multiple grades at increasing levels of depth and sophistication

Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCIs)

Life Science - LS2.C: Ecosystem Dynamics, Functioning, and Resilience

  • Moreover, anthropogenic changes (induced by human activity) in the environment—including habitat destruction, pollution, introduction of invasive species, overexploitation, and climate change—can disrupt an ecosystem and threaten the survival of some species.

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Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCIs)

Engineering Design - ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions

  • When evaluating solutions it is important to take into account a range of constraints including cost, safety, reliability and aesthetics and to consider social, cultural and environmental impacts. (secondary)

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Integrating the Three Dimensions and
Performance Expectations

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Performance expectations are “end points” that are assessed at the end.

Teachers role is to design instruction to get students to that end point.

Instruction should engage students in practices

Three-Dimensional Science Learning

Engaging in science and engineering practices to use disciplinary core ideas and crosscutting concepts to explain phenomenon or solve problems

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Scientific Ideas Are Not Enough!

Understanding content is inextricably linked to engaging in practices. Simply “consuming” information leads to declarative, isolated ideas.

Science is both a body of knowledge and the process that develops and refines that body of knowledge. Understanding both the ideas and process is essential for progress in science.

The learning of science is similar: students cannot learn one without the other.

Biggest Shifts in NGSS

Three-dimensional learning for the purpose of sensemaking through explaining phenomena or solving problems

Shifting from ‘learning about’ to ‘figuring out’!

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Berland (2011) describes practices as the habits of mind and processes undertaken by communities of scientists as they work to develop explanations and arguments for explaining natural phenomena and/or leverage science for making informed decisions as citizens.

Starts with Phenomena!

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A complex anchoring phenomenon is an occurrence or event that happen(ed) in our world

What is the state of your

local water resource?

Model First Day Lesson

Link to Scientist Notebook Google Doc

Make a Copy

https://goo.gl/KFCCmN

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Collaborative Project Norms

Collaborative Team Partnerships Norms for Project Work. These norms are designed to ensure that project members are recognized as essential team members with unique existing resources (knowledge, ideas, and ways of solving problems) that are important for accomplishing project team pursuits. If adopted, we believe these norms will support equitable learning experiences for all involved.

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Go over shortened norms on chart paper and refer teachers to norms in scientist notebooks

What do you predict is the state of each water
resource and why?

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Present phenomena: aerial photos of 3 water resources located close to the UCONN campus (1 min)

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1. Students write individual initial explanations about the state of each water resource and why in their scientist notebook. (3 min)
2. Students in small groups share initial ideas and brainstorm how they could answer the question (5 min)

Gotta Have List:

A list of ideas that are important to include in answers to the question about the phenomenon].

  • All contributions will be recorded on the board to start.
  • Once everyone’s ideas have been shared, the class will evaluate the list and determine what they agree should be included in everyone’s initial models.

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3. Whole group discussion to create initial Gotta Have List (5 min)

Science and Engineering Practice (SEP) Modeling

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1. Review scientific model - important that it shows the mechanism for the phenomenon – the why. Use pictures, arrows, words (3 min)
2. Student groups work on initial model of 3 water resources (15 min)


  • What is the State of Your local Water resource and Why?

1. Create Models

2. Post on Walls

3. Gallery Walk

4. Discussion comparing models

and ideas

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3. Groups post models and gallery walk (5 min)
4. Class discussion comparing models and ideas. What would you need to know to answer the question? (10 min)
5. Preview of next day’s lesson – Water quality testing (1 min)

Preview of Next Day’s Lesson

Field trip to sites

Or bringing water and pictures of site to classroom

(Notes for workshop - make sure at least 1 person in each team goes to each site)

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IMG_4409.JPG

IMG_4409.JPG

Day 1 Summary Chart and

Notes Break

Add to model

PUT ON YOUR LEARNER HAT

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Complete summary chart together. (15 min)

Time to jot down notes

Last few minutes share notes and remind them it is OK to copy good ideas

Day

PUT ON YOUR LEARNER HAT

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Complete summary chart together. (15 min)

Time to jot down notes

Last few minutes share notes and remind them it is OK to copy good ideas

Day

Initial Gotta Have List

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Eagelville

Horsebarn

Fenton

-Human impacts from pollution, transportation, road salts

-parallel to road- underground?

Stormwater running info

-impacted agricultural practices/ surface runoff

-former hazardous waste facility

-clearest

-coolest

- low temperature

- forested

- high O2

-highest biodiversity

Day 3 Final Gotta Have List

Revise initial model with Gotta Have List and Summary Charts

PUT ON YOUR LEARNER HAT

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Complete summary chart together. (15 min)

Time to jot down notes

Last few minutes share notes and remind them it is OK to copy good ideas

Revise initial models

Human Impact on Local Water Resources

Unit

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PART 1: PLANNING A UNIT AROUND “BIG SCIENCE IDEAS”

PART 2: ELICITING AND ACTIVATING STUDENTS’ IDEAS ABOUT A PUZZLING PHENOMENON (FOR THE PURPOSE OF ADAPTING INSTRUCTION)

Initial Modelng Lesson and Discourse

The following framework was used to think about and plan for formative assessment: (a) anticipating and eliciting students’ ideas, (b) evaluating students’ ideas, and (c) crafting next steps in instruction that account for students’ ideas and support students’ learning (Sabel, Forbes, & Zangori, 2015).

PART 3: HELPING STUDENTS MAKE SENSE OF SCIENCE ACTIVITIES (WITH THE AIM OF USING SCIENCE PRINCIPLES BEHIND ACTIVITIES TO EXPLAIN ANCHORING PHENOMENON)

Daily lessons Day 3 - 10

PART 4: PRESSING STUDENTS TO CONSTRUCT EVIDENCE-BASED EXPLANATIONS

Revisiting intial models and individual explanations

PART 5: APPLYING WHAT WE LEARNED TO A REAL WORLD PROBLEM THROUGH ENGINEERING DESIGN

Lessons 11 - 15+

PART 6: ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING

Designing three dimensional summative assessment

Unit Structure:

Parts 1-4 from Stroupe and Windschitl’s (2015) framework for Ambitious Science Teaching

PART 1: PLANNING A UNIT AROUND “BIG SCIENCE IDEAS”

PART 2: ELICITING AND ACTIVATING STUDENTS’ IDEAS ABOUT A PUZZLING PHENOMENON (FOR THE PURPOSE OF ADAPTING INSTRUCTION)

PART 3: HELPING STUDENTS MAKE SENSE OF SCIENCE ACTIVITIES (WITH THE AIM OF USING SCIENCE PRINCIPLES BEHIND ACTIVITIES TO EXPLAIN ANCHORING PHENOMENON)

PART 4: PRESSING STUDENTS TO CONSTRUCT EVIDENCE-BASED EXPLANATIONS

PART 5: APPLYING WHAT WE LEARNED TO A REAL WORLD PROBLEM THROUGH ENGINEERING DESIGN

PART 6: ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING


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Parts 2 & 3

PART 2: Initial Modeling Lesson and Discourse

The following framework was used to think about and plan for formative assessment: (a) anticipating and eliciting students’ ideas, (b) evaluating students’ ideas, and (c) crafting next steps in instruction that account for students’ ideas and support students’ learning (Sabel, Forbes, & Zangori, 2015).

Part 3: Lessons 2-10 Summary chart p. 17 of Unit

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Parts 4& 5

Part 4: PRESSING STUDENTS TO CONSTRUCT

Evidence Based Statements

  • Revision of original model, discussion, and individual explanations
  • Class review of group models and building of class consensus model

Part 5: Researching Low Impact Development (LID) to protect or improve these resources

  • Initiating Design of LID project for school’s water resource
  • Designing solution and building prototype[optional] and Presenting

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Adapt Unit to Your Local Water Resource

https://goo.gl/bNEM11

3. Create an example of the final model you want your students to create (30 min)

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  • Find Sites (aerial view with Google Maps) (30 min)

2. Revise Target Explanation for your sites (30 min)

Adapt Unit to Your Local Water Resource

6. Create Assessment (30 min)

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4. Check concepts with target

Explanation (30 min)

5. Check Activities (30 min)

Teacher Professional Learning Workshop.ppt - Google Slides