Housekeeping Stuff

Dan Anderson, “The Low Bridge to High Benefits”

  • For educators, such a conception allows us to turn computer literacy from a thing into an activity, sloughing off definitions that would fix computer literacy as a set of skills in favor of processes through which multiple literacies can flow, processes like borrowing, mixing, layering, and sharing. (41)
  • The links between motivation, new media, multiliteracies, agency, and civic participation can be readily traced. Less clear, however, are the connections between these items and changes in education….Sirc is clear that this over-disciplining of composition bleeds the motivation from students, leading only to “alienation” and “exhaustion” (p. 209). New composing processes feature literacies like juxtaposition, parody, or pastiche and build upon student interests. These remix modes can overcome the boredom and “exhaustion in most writing assignments” (p. 212), making students “architects of their own aesthetics” (p. 132). (46) Yes, but….

Dan Anderson, “The Low Bridge to High Benefits”

  • The transformations that unfold as alphabetic literacies are applied to new media (as in playlist assignments) or as functional and content-area literacies are blended with visual lit- eracies (in collages) yield high levels of motivation but also raise fundamental questions about what takes place in the composition classroom. At some point we must ask, as responsible teachers and scholars of composition, how far can we walk from the written word? (52)

Dan Anderson, “The Low Bridge to High Benefits”

  • “The different techniques mentioned in this article have inadvertently given me some ideas for the CSW. The playlists, collages, and videos seem like moderately difficult tasks that even I could explain to my students. Anderson states, “[t]he entry-level nature of low-bridge technologies ameliorates difficulties that can shut down flow, but the challenge of composing with unfamiliar forms opens pathways in creativity and motivation (44), which allows students to approach their topics with a fresh perspective.”
  • “I often wonder how people actually acquire these types of skills or media knowledge outside of the classroom. Certainly, people have parents, friends, siblings, other family that can motivate them use different types of media technology and programs. What happens after the class is over, and the grade have been distributed? Do the students continue to work on different projects outside of school?”
  • What’s “low bridge” now, anyway?

Cheryl Ball, “Assessing Scholarly Multimedia”

  • “Scholarly multimedia cannot be printed and still retain the author’s argument because such texts are composed of Web pages with links, animations, images, audio, video, scripting languages, databases, and other multimedia and interactive elements, including but not limited to written text (62).”
  • (A Delangrange tangent…)
  • This is why my values system for assessing webtexts may not, cannot, will not necessarily be yours. (And this is most certainly not what the Kairos editorial board uses when they evaluate submissions. In fact, there are no set criteria for Kairos submis- sions, as each piece must be evaluated on its own terms in relation to that moment and to tech- nology and media and genre, in time. This is also why I was so opposed to writing this version of this article: because I am worried that Kuhn þ2 will be adopted without exploration or under- standing the need to consider an assignment within its historical, technological, cultural, and social framework. See Prior et al., 2007.) (68)

Cheryl Ball, “Assessing Scholarly Multimedia”

  • Formative feedback on the form=content of a piece can be given at any stage in the compositional process, but is best—as always—caught early, such as in the proposal or storyboard stage of the project. Still, sometimes, the conceptual core of a piece sounds great in the proposal and their form=content description in the proposal sounds like it could work, but until an author presents a storyboard or rough draft well into the compositional process, the problems the author had in carrying out the form and content relationship do not become evident. (Also, no one wants to revise a multimodal project, which usually involves reenvisioning the project and starting from scratch—not something any teacher wishes on a student with only 3 weeks left in a semester.) (69)

Cheryl Ball, “Assessing Scholarly Multimedia”

  • “I really love this article. I don’t know if Ball is allowing me to think about composition in new ways, or if it’s the steady build-up of articles we’ve been reading on DH, but this article seems like a turning point in my understanding. When Ball emphasized the importance that “the media and modes complement, if not create, the point the author wants to make” (61), I begin to see how multimodality enhances content, not just changes the vehicle of communication. Her explanations of the Wunderkammer and fibromyalgia projects make it even more apparent that DH creates a new experience for the reader and requires new ways of composing and planning for the writer. I also really love that the students help create the rubric before the project begins – there’s kind of a simple genius in that. I do wish she gave us even more details about how this class runs, but she mentions other sources that may include that information.”
  • “I completely agree about how the students are in on the rubrics! I want to look at more by Ball since this could potentially help with my issue for Fleischer's class.”

Multimedia, Time, and DH

  • In what ways are these pieces kind of (already) dated?
  • How do these essays fit into an argument/discussion about “Digital Humanities?”

Hobbs & Donnelly, “Toward A Pedagogy of Fair Use…”

  • “Just as students quote from other authors in their written text, they need to be able to use, sample from, and manipulate copyrighted works in learning various skills associated with media literacy, including exploring image–language relationships, considering point of view, and analyzing framing aspects. In particular, remix is a dimension of teaching media literacy that depends upon student ability to transform the meaning of an existing text by manipulating the form, structure, and/or content to explore how meaning is shaped through symbol systems that operate in a complex cultural, historical, political, and economic context (Jenkins, 2006).” (280)
  • “Johndan Johnson-Eilola and Stuart Selber explained that, for composition educators, remixing “inhabits a contested terrain of creativity, intellectual property, authorship, corporate ownership and power” (p. 392). In this view, remix cannot supplant traditional composition, but it can complement it.”

Hobbs & Donnelly, “Toward A Pedagogy of Fair Use…”

  • “Some educators felt that editing exercises that make use of copyrighted materials were appropriate for classroom use, but not appropriate for distribution. One college professor pointed out that students need to be made aware of professional norms, arguing, “they get to college and know nothing about professional behavior.”” (283)
  • (That example in table 1)
  • “Professionalism” on 289-90

Hobbs & Donnelly, “Toward A Pedagogy of Fair Use…”

  • I really enjoyed this article. To start off, I noticed a lot of connections to Anderson’s article. More specifically, there was a lot of overlap in the argument that multimedia composition can foster student learning with authentic audiences, increasing student creativity, and motivate students to participate in civic discourse.

    I also think there’s a real need for this article, especially considering that (according to this article) so many teachers are afraid to integrate multimedia into their classrooms due to misunderstandings of copyright and fair use laws. It’s important that we recognize the many (student learning) benefits associated with remixing or reappropriating something for new purposes. I suppose my lingering question about this article is: Is there a critical mass of teachers who agree with Hobbs and Donnelly—and if so, what are the chances we’ll see a more “robust” or liberal interpretation of fair use in the near future?

Hobbs & Donnelly, “Toward A Pedagogy of Fair Use…”

  • The authors of the article point out that one English teacher said: “Using the analogy of scholarly texts, you are framing analysis around it, not just hanging it out there like an ornament. Then I would say it is fair use.” So it seems that as long as the copyright material is simply not just presented as is to an audience, but rather evaluated or interpreted in a way that affects a students written work, then it is considered under the fair use law.
    Also, I have been wondering exactly what remixing is as a rhetorical term. I know what a remix is as a musical technique that refashions an existing record or recording, so I figured it was similar to that. I think I was pretty close. But Hobbs and Donnelly formulate what remixing is in composition in a much more concise way: “remix is a dimension of teaching media literacy that depends upon student ability to transform the meaning of an existing text by manipulating the form, structure, and/or content to explore how meaning is shaped through symbol systems that operate in a complex cultural, historical, political, and economic context” (280). This concept helped me understand better what it means to take an existing media and use it to evaluate some other rhetorical situation.

Aoki, Boyle, Jenkins “Tales from the Public Domain”

  • Comics!!
  • “The style of this writing, however, is difficult for me to read. I want it to be fun, but it never is.”
  • This comic is a fun way to better understand how fair use works and can be used by writers. It reminded me of a larger version of how Anderson talks about motivation in his article. Rather than just writing an article about fair use and telling an audience this is what it is and this is how you can use it, the authors present the problem in the form of a comic. In this way (with images, characters, and settings) the comic form engages the reader to think of the understanding of fair use as an adventure. Also I'm sure the authors probably felt more engaged creating the comic. Since they chose that type of format they are probably interested in comics themselves.

A couple clips from Remix

A couple clips from Remix

WRTG 516: February 11 - Google Slides