2019-2020
Bloodborne Pathogens
Information – Precautions - Procedures

An On-Line

Professional Development Course

Offered By

Bartlesville Public Schools

For

Bartlesville Public School Employees

Equals One Contact Hour of Training

Course Credit

  • At the end of the course, Bartlesville Public School employees may access a quiz to document participation in Bloodborne Pathogens training for the period August 1, 2019 through May 22, 2020.

  • Your principal will receive electronic notification when you have completed Bloodborne Pathogens training.
  • Upon completion of the training quiz, you should receive an email with the results you can review and another with a virtual certificate you can download and file in your Google Drive.
  • You do NOT need to send a copy of your certificate to the ESC or your site.

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What Are Bloodborne Pathogens?

Bloodborne Pathogens are microorganisms such as virus or bacteria that are carried in blood and can cause diseases in people. These pathogens include viral hepatitis, human immunodeficiency virus (AIDS), malaria, rabies and syphilis.

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Where Are They Found?

  • In the school setting potentially infectious materials are most often found in human body fluids such as:
    • Blood
    • Saliva
    • Vomit
    • Urine
    • Semen
    • Vaginal secretions
  • A blood test is required to confirm a BBP infection.

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School employees have a low to moderate risk of
exposure to bloodborne pathogens. Employees
most at risk of exposure are:

    • School Nurses
    • Athletic Coaches
    • Custodians
    • Special Education Teachers
    • Regular Classroom Teachers

Because risks for exposure do exists, all Bartlesville Public School employees must be prepared to respond using standard precautions.

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How Does Exposure Occur?

In the school setting potential exposure to

bloodborne pathogens occur most often from direct

contact with:

  • Body fluids from the nose, mouth and eyes that contain blood.
  • Bleeding wounds caused by cut, punctured and abraded skin.
  • Bleeding skin conditions such as acne and athlete’s foot.
  • Human bites by students.
  • Chronic or sudden onset diarrhea or vomit that is contaminated with blood.

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Pathogens of Greatest Concern

  • The pathogens of primary concern are:
    • Hepatitis B virus (HBV)
    • Hepatitis C virus (HCV)
    • Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

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Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)

  • HBV is found in the blood and body fluids of an infected person.

  • HBV can live for an extended time – over one week - in dry blood and on dry surfaces.

  • Average incubation period (the time between the initial exposure to the virus and the development of symptoms of the HBV disease) is about 16 weeks or 4 months.

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Hepatitis B Prevention

In the school setting:

  • The most effective way to prevent exposure to the Hepatitis B virus is to wear gloves if you have to touch anyone’s blood.

  • If your skin is exposed to blood or body fluids, immediately wash the exposed area with soap and water.

  • Flush exposed eyes, mouth or nose with water for at least 15 minutes.

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Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Symptoms

Symptoms you may experience if infected with HBV:

    • Tiredness
    • Loss of appetite
    • Fever
    • Diarrhea
    • Dark urine
    • Light-colored stools
    • Jaundice (yellow skin and eyes)

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Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)

  • HCV is found in the blood and body fluids of an infected person.
  • Average incubation period (the time between the initial exposure to the virus and the development of symptoms of the HCV disease) is 7 to 9 weeks or about 2 months.

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Hepatitis C Prevention

In the school setting:

  • The most effective way to prevent exposure to the Hepatitis C virus is to wear gloves if you have to touch anyone’s blood.

  • Do not share items that may have blood on them.

  • If your skin is exposed to blood or body fluids, immediately wash the exposed area with soap and water.

  • Flush exposed eyes, mouth or nose with water for at least 15 minutes.

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Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Symptoms

Symptoms you my experience if infected with HCV:

    • Tiredness
    • Loss of appetite
    • Fever
    • Stomach ache
    • Diarrhea
    • Dark urine
    • Light-colored stools
    • Jaundice (yellow skin and eyes)

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Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

  • HIV is a bloodborne infectious disease.

    • The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is most likely the cause of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

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HIV Is Not Transmitted

HIV is not transmitted by shaking hands with or touching a person infected with HIV.

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HIV Is Not Transmitted

A person cannot become infected with HIV by touching a toilet seat, drinking fountain, desk or computer screen used by a person infected with HIV.

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Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

  • In the school setting the most likely way for transmitting HIV is through contact with infected student’s blood through an open wound or exposure to blood found in a bodily fluid.

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HIV/AIDS Symptoms

  • An infected person can pass on the HIV infection before symptoms appear.
  • Initial symptoms of HIV infection can vary widely, are often very mild and mimic other diseases.

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HIV/AIDS Symptoms

  • Aids symptoms include:
    • Physical weakness
    • Fever and sore throat
    • Nausea
    • Headaches
    • Diarrhea
    • Thrush (a fungal infection of the mouth)
    • Weight loss
    • Swollen lymph glands

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Standard Precautions/Risk Reduction

Standard precautions” are procedures used to reduce risks of exposure to bloodborne pathogens.

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Standard Precautions – Hand Hygiene

  • The single most effective way to prevent bloodborne pathogen exposure in the school setting is to use standard precaution hand hygiene including:

      • Hand washing using soap and water
      • Hand cleaning using alcohol-based hand rubs
      • Proper use of protective gloves

  • Even if your hands appear to be clean, the process of providing first aid or cleaning up a contaminated area may lead to hand contamination.

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Hand Hygiene – Soap & Water

  • Use soap and water to clean hands when:

      • Hands are visibly dirty.
      • Hands have been contaminated with blood or body fluids.
      • You have handled contaminated materials.
      • You remove protective gloves.

  • Liquid soap is preferred to bar soap.
  • Warm or tepid water is preferred to cold water.
  • Running water is preferred to a bowl of water.

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Hand Hygiene – Soap & Water

The Center for Disease Control recommends the following hand washing method for soap and water:

  • Wet hands with clean running water.

  • Apply enough soap to cover all hand surfaces.

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Hand Hygiene – Soap & Water

  • Rub hands together to make a lather; cover all surfaces - Including backs of hands, between fingers and fingernails.

  • Rub hand for at least 20 seconds. (Hum the “Happy Birthday” Song twice.)

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Hand Hygiene – Soap & Water

  • Rinse hands under running water.

  • Dry hands with a single use towel or air dry.

  • Use towel to turn off faucet.

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Hand Hygiene – Alcohol Rubs

  • Keeping hands clean is one of the most important steps we can take to avoid getting sick and spreading germs.

  • The Center for Disease Control (CDC) recommends washing with soap and water as the best way to reduce the number of germs on hands.

  • If soap and clean water are not available, CDC recommends using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol to clean hands.

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Hand Hygiene – Alcohol Rubs

  • The Center for Disease Control (CDC) does not recommend using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if:
    • Hands are visibly dirty
    • Hands have been contaminated with blood or body fluids

  • In the school setting alcohol-based hand sanitizer can be effectively used to maintain hand hygiene in the classroom, on field trips and during sporting events when soap and clean water may not be readily available.

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Procedure

for

Using Alcohol

Hand

Sanitizer

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Hand Hygiene - Gloves

  • Gloves should be used when hands may become contaminated with blood or body fluids, or when touching contaminated surfaces or objects.

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Hand Hygiene - Gloves

Remember to:

  • Change gloves between students or tasks.
  • Change gloves if a tear or puncture occurs.
  • Remove gloves and wash hands after each task is completed.

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Hand Hygiene - Gloves

Glove facts to remember:

  • Gloves should be made of latex, nitrile, rubber or other water impervious materials.

  • Put gloves on without touching the inside of the glove except with the skin of your hand.

  • Remove gloves carefully so the outside of the glove does not touch your bare hand or other skin.

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Response to Human Bites

  • Bites which break the skin should be treated as a bloodborne pathogen exposure.

  • Not all human bites break the skin. Some just cause bruising.

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Response to Human Bites

  • When you are not sure if a human bite has broken the skin, treat the injury as a bloodborne pathogen exposure.

  • With or without broken skin, both the person bitten and the person inflicting the bite should receive immediate first aid care from a school nurse or first aid responder.

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Response to Human Bites

  • Bartlesville Public School employees who experience a human bite while performing job related responsibilities must:
    • Report the incident to your principal or immediate supervisor.
    • Document in writing the circumstances of the exposure.
    • Request a confidential medical evaluation if the skin is broken.

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Response to Human Saliva or “Spit”

  • Human saliva or “spit” that is contaminated with blood may cause a bloodborne pathogen exposure if it comes in contact with the mucous membranes in the eyes, nose or mouth of another person.

  • Blood contaminated saliva or “spit” can also cause a bloodborne pathogen exposure if it comes in contact with cuts, sores, abrasions, dermatitis or chapped skin on another person.

  • Intact skin that is struck with saliva or “spit” that does not contain blood is not likely to cause a bloodborne pathogen exposure but the contaminated skin should be immediately washed thoroughly with soap and water.

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Response to Human Saliva or “Spit”

  • Employees who are exposed to human saliva or “spit” should also:
    • Report the incident to your principal or immediate supervisor.
    • Document in writing the date, time, names of perpetrator and victim, names of witnesses and a description of what happened before, during and after the altercation.
    • Request a confidential medical evaluation if blood is present.

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Standard Precautions
Hepatitis B Vaccine

Hepatitis B vaccine shall be available to any

employee who experiences a potential exposure to

bloodborne pathogens. The following conditions

may qualify as exceptions:

    • The employee has previously received the complete Hepatitis B vaccination series.
    • Antibody testing reveals that the employee is immune.
    • The vaccine is contraindicated for medical reasons.
    • The employee declines the vaccination.

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Hepatitis B Vaccination Refusal

  • If an employee initially declines the Hepatitis B vaccination; but later decides to accept the vaccination, the vaccination shall then be made available.

  • If an employee declines the Hepatitis B vaccination when offered, the employee shall be required to sign the OSHA required waiver indicating their refusal.

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Responsibilities
of All BPS Employees

ALL Bartlesville Public School Employees shall have the responsibility for:

    • Annually participating in Bloodborne Pathogen training.
    • Being aware of the procedures outlined in their building or department Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure Control Plan.
    • Knowing where protective supplies are kept.
    • Knowing how to protect themselves and all students in the building from potential bloodborne pathogen exposure.

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Standard Precautions
Post Exposure Follow-Up

  • Any Bartlesville Public School employee who experiences a potential bloodborne pathogen exposure shall document and report the incident.
  • The employee shall document in writing:
    • The time and location of the incident.
    • The parties involved in the incident.
    • How the exposure occurred.
    • The standard precautions followed to mitigate the incident.
  • The employee shall report the incident to their immediate supervisor, building principal, or department supervisor.

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Responsibility of Building Principals and Department Supervisors

Building Principals and Department Supervisors shall have the responsibility for ensuring that all employees in their building or department:

    • Annually receive Bloodborne Pathogen training.
    • Have access to necessary supplies to protect themselves and all students including.
      • Gloves and protective equipment
      • Soap and water
      • Bleach and disinfecting agents.
      • Brooms and dustpans.
      • Appropriate disposal containers.

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Responsibility of Building Principals and Department Supervisors

Building Principals and Department Supervisors shall have the responsibility for ensuring that all employees in their building or department:

    • Practice universal precaution hand hygiene.
    • Have access to Hepatitis B vaccinations if exposure occurs.
    • Report potential exposures to:
      • Kerry Ickleberry, Safe and Healthy Schools Coordinator, IckleberryKg@bps-ok.org 918-336-3311 ext. 1196

      • Dianne Martinez, Executive Director of Elementary Education, Gifted and Talented, et al.

MartinezDK@bps-ok.org 918-336-8600 ext. 3531

Jason Langham, Executive Director of Secondary Education and Special Services

LanghamRJ@bps-ok.org 918-336-8600 ext. 3515

    • Monitor building or department Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure Control Plan.

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District Bloodborne Pathogen Policy

The district Bloodborne Pathogen Policy is included in the

Bartlesville Board of Education

Policy Manual

Section CFE Workplace Hazards

Hygiene and Sanitation (Bloodborne Pathogens)

Latest Revision 08/19/2002

http://www.bps-ok.org/policies/_pdf/CFE.pdf

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Resources

Lisa Foreman, B.S.N., R.N. 

District School Nurse

E-mail – ForemanLE@bps-ok.org

Check with Nurse Lisa if you have questions or need information about:

Bloodborne pathogens

Hepatitis, HIV/AIDS

Standard precautions, Hand hygiene

Hepatitis B vaccine

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Active Web Links to Resources

  • The following active web links will take you to original source documents where you can find additional information about bloodborne pathogens, diseases caused by BBPs and workplace law.
  • For the links to activate, your computer screen must be maximized.
  • If you are unable to activate a link, copy the link and paste it in your web browser.

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Resources

Check the Center for Disease Control (CDC)

web-site for additional information about:

Bloodborne Pathogens

Hepatitis

HIV/AIDS

Standard Precautions

Hand Hygiene

http://www.cdc.gov

Type “bloodborne Pathogens” in the search box.

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Resources

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You have completed the study portion of the

2019-2020
Bloodborne Pathogens
Information – Precautions – Procedures

On-Line Professional Development Course

to receive Professional Development Credit

click the link below to access a documentation quiz:

Click here for help if you have trouble accessing the quiz

After completing the quiz, you’ll receive an email with the results for your review and should receive a second one with your certificate you can file in Google Drive. Please do NOT send your certificate to the ESC or your site; we will have an electronic record of your completion on file.

If you have questions about this training, please contact:

Kelli Bryant, Teacher Specialist of Student Accountability and Assessments

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2019-2020 BBP Training - Google Slides