Engage, Educate and Empower:

Digital Citizenship, Your Child & You

February 28, 2018

Gena Pacada & Karen Larson

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Goals

Engage, Educate and Empower: Digital Citizenship, Your Child and You

2

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    • Empower your child to make smart choices
    • Select age-appropriate content
    • Find tools that support you as a parent living in their digital world

The Plan

Engage, Educate and Empower: Digital Citizenship, Your Child and You

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  • SUPER BRIEF overview of digital literacy and citizenship
  • Ways to support your child
  • Explore parent resources
      • Common Sense Media
      • Family Online Safety Institute
      • Google
      • And more!

Digital reality check

We are living in a digital revolution. Changes that are happening with media are changing the way we live.

Media Use by Tweens and Teens

Common Sense Census, 2015

Here’s some compelling data to help us understand the digital world of tweens and teens.

This information based on a national survey of 2,600 students. It includes screen media and non-screen media, like listening to music and reading books.

Key points:

Girls are twice as likely to experience bullying than boys.

87% have witnessed bullying online

25% do not know what to do if bullied online

1 in 3 have been bullied online

1 in 10 victims do not tell their parents when cyberbullying occurs

Doesn’t include using the work of others, establishing a clean digital footprint, using reliable information when researching, protecting our privacy.

38% of frequent bully-victims reported suicidal thinking or a suicide attempt during the past year.

Cyberbullying is a concern of every parent. FOSI, the Family Online Safety Institute provides resources to help parents detects signs and help you work with your children in addressing this issue.

https://www.fosi.org/good-digital-parenting/cyberbullying-guide/

Data Privacy issues

Don’t know what these sites are? See CSM What is…? videos

Knowing that our kids will be interacting with social media. We really need to help them by reminding them to THINK before they put something out there for the world to see. They need to be reminded that every post is a part of their digital footprint that stays with them and is judged by others.

Image: alxa.ru

Digital Literacy and Citizenship

A whole-community approach

Common Sense Media helps teachers and parents deal with the challenges and optimize the opportunities of digital media.

They recommend a whole-community approach to digital citizenship. This means encouraging schools to bring together students, parents, and schools to work together on education efforts and to create a positive school climate. It literally “takes a village” to successfully address these issues.

Teens and Tech: The New Landscape

This explains the digital landscape for parents.

Rules of the Road for Parents

Rules of the Road for Parents

Explain That Nothing Is Really Private

• In today’s media environment, it’s very important to discuss protecting kids’ own privacy – as well as their friends’.

• Kids need to understand that anything they put online or send to their friends on their cell phones isn’t really private. Everything leaves a digital footprint, and whatever gets created never goes away.

• Anything that kids put out in the digital world can be cut and pasted and spread throughout their entire school – and beyond – with the click of a button. So while kids may not intend for something to go public, it easily can.

Establish Privacy Settings

• The most basic thing that kids can do to protect themselves is set up privacy settings on any social networking site. Each major site has an area where you can access this information. Kids shouldn’t assume that the default state is “private” – they need to adjust the settings to limit what other people can see and access.

• Kids also need to understand that they should protect their friends’ privacy too. Passing along a rumor or identifying someone in a picture (called “tagging”) affects that person’s privacy. If your kids are tagged in friends’ photos, they can ask to have the photos or the tags removed. But there’s not too much they can do beyond that.

Keep Passwords Private

• Kids shouldn’t share their passwords with anyone but you. They may think that telling their best friend is OK, but they can never predict what their friend might do with that information if they happened to get in a fight. It’s just not worth the risk.

Rules of the Road for Parents

  • Embrace their world

  • Encourage balanced use
  • Monitor media as best you can
  • Discuss what sites they can visit

  • No cyberbullying

Common Sense Media has answers to parent concerns!

Great resource on a multitude of media questions, including screen time.

Protect Personal Privacy

  • Explain that nothing is really private

  • Set up privacy settings

  • Keep passwords private

Explain That Nothing Is Really Private

• In today’s media environment, it’s very important to discuss protecting kids’ own privacy – as well as their friends’.

• Kids need to understand that anything they put online or send to their friends on their cell phones isn’t really private. Everything leaves a digital footprint, and whatever gets created never goes away.

• Anything that kids put out in the digital world can be cut and pasted and spread throughout their entire school – and beyond – with the click of a button. So while kids may not intend for something to go public, it easily can.

Establish Privacy Settings

• The most basic thing that kids can do to protect themselves is set up privacy settings on any social networking site. Each major site has an area where you can access this information. Kids shouldn’t assume that the default state is “private” – they need to adjust the settings to limit what other people can see and access.

• Kids also need to understand that they should protect their friends’ privacy too. Passing along a rumor or identifying someone in a picture (called “tagging”) affects that person’s privacy. If your kids are tagged in friends’ photos, they can ask to have the photos or the tags removed. But there’s not too much they can do beyond that.

Keep Passwords Private

• Kids shouldn’t share their passwords with anyone but you. They may think that telling their best friend is OK, but they can never predict what their friend might do with that information if they happened to get in a fight. It’s just not worth the risk.

Creating Identity

  • Explain how the identity they create today could come back to haunt them tomorrow
  • Talk about risky behavior
  • Discuss accountability

Explain that the identity they create today could haunt them tomorrow.

• So help kids self-reflect before they self-reveal.

• Remember, it’s their job to explore their identities. But they need to be reminded that what they post today could haunt them tomorrow.

• Kids should think before they post. Talk about the importance of asking questions, such as:

-What is my purpose for creating this?

-Who is my audience?

-Am I creating this for myself, to make an impression, and/or to get my peers’ approval?

-How much should I reveal?

-Who might see this? What am I saying about myself? How will people interpret this?

-What will they think about me?

• Use what your kids post as a jumping-off point for conversation and discussion – ask why they chose that particular screen name, why they posted a certain picture, etc.

•Ask your kids about their avatars and how much they identify with them. What do they think is like them, and what’s different? Feel free to question the choices that kids have made. If your kids say their avatar means nothing, that’s a valid response. They could just be playing around and like what they created. Either way, it will give you insight into who they are.

Talk About Risky Behavior

• Establish some ground rules in case kids are fuzzy about what not to post. No nude or semi-nude photos or videos. No pictures of doing drugs, drinking, or having sex. Since kids don’t know who will see that information or how it could get passed on, it’s just too risky, even if they think they’re being “cute.”

• Talk about other risky behavior too, like having sexually explicit conversations in chat rooms with people they don’t know.

Click Three: Discuss Accountability

•Whatever kids post – whether they do it anonymously or not – they need to be accountable for it. Remind them that what goes around comes around. If they spread a rumor, send a photo someone sent them which was meant to be private, or talk trash about a teacher, it’s likely that someone will find out that they posted it. And they could get in trouble with the school – or even law enforcement.

•If kids are creating avatars, make sure they aren’t making stereotyped or racially charged decisions. Prejudice is as real in cyberspace as it is in the offline world. And even with avatars, kids need to know that just because they're disguised doesn't mean they can't be identified.

•The bottom line is that if kids wouldn't say something to someone's face, they shouldn't say or post it online.

Creating Identity

Explain that the identity they create today could haunt them tomorrow.

• So help kids self-reflect before they self-reveal.

• Remember, it’s their job to explore their identities. But they need to be reminded that what they post today could haunt them tomorrow.

• Kids should think before they post. Talk about the importance of asking questions, such as:

-What is my purpose for creating this?

-Who is my audience?

-Am I creating this for myself, to make an impression, and/or to get my peers’ approval?

-How much should I reveal?

-Who might see this? What am I saying about myself? How will people interpret this?

-What will they think about me?

• Use what your kids post as a jumping-off point for conversation and discussion – ask why they chose that particular screen name, why they posted a certain picture, etc.

•Ask your kids about their avatars and how much they identify with them. What do they think is like them, and what’s different? Feel free to question the choices that kids have made. If your kids say their avatar means nothing, that’s a valid response. They could just be playing around and like what they created. Either way, it will give you insight into who they are.

Talk About Risky Behavior

• Establish some ground rules in case kids are fuzzy about what not to post. No nude or semi-nude photos or videos. No pictures of doing drugs, drinking, or having sex. Since kids don’t know who will see that information or how it could get passed on, it’s just too risky, even if they think they’re being “cute.”

• Talk about other risky behavior too, like having sexually explicit conversations in chat rooms with people they don’t know.

Click Three: Discuss Accountability

•Whatever kids post – whether they do it anonymously or not – they need to be accountable for it. Remind them that what goes around comes around. If they spread a rumor, send a photo someone sent them which was meant to be private, or talk trash about a teacher, it’s likely that someone will find out that they posted it. And they could get in trouble with the school – or even law enforcement.

•If kids are creating avatars, make sure they aren’t making stereotyped or racially charged decisions. Prejudice is as real in cyberspace as it is in the offline world. And even with avatars, kids need to know that just because they're disguised doesn't mean they can't be identified.

•The bottom line is that if kids wouldn't say something to someone's face, they shouldn't say or post it online.

Ownership of Work

  • Encourage creativity
  • Explain how cheating online is still cheating
  • Talk about copyright issues

Encourage Creativity

•  Kids can do amazing things digitally, and there are many wonderful sites that engage them in creating works of art – whether it’s music, anime, videos, or fiction. Get familiar with some of these sites, especially the ever-popular YouTube. Steer kids toward sites that further their interests and your family’s values. Students can protect their own work for free using Creative Commons.

Explain That Cheating Online Is Still Cheating

•  All of the previous rules apply not just to kids’ artistic creations, but also to their schoolwork. Many kids plagiarize using online sources or use their cell phones to send friends answers to tests. Kids need to understand that cheating using media is still cheating – not only is that behavior unethical, but they could get in a lot of trouble for doing it.

Talk About Copyright Issues

•  Talk to kids about another big no-no: using someone else’s work without that person’s approval, when possible. And if it’s not possible, kids need to give the person credit for having created the original image/video/etc.

•  When kids use someone else’s creation without their permission or crediting them as the source, it’s called plagiarism, piracy, or copyright violation. The idea is for kids to create something themselves, not to rip off something or someone else. A great way to drive this home is to ask kids how they would feel if someone used their own videos or photos – items they had worked really hard to create – without giving them any credit.

•  Kids can use small chunks of other people’s work – that’s called fair use – but they should still source it.

Who Can Children Trust

  • Encourage who, what, when and how questions when online (bias)
  • Balance research sources
  • Is a person who they say they are?

  • Point out ways marketers target them

Who Kids Can Trust and Believe

Teach Kids to Ask the Who, What, and When Questions

•Help kids learn who and what they can trust and believe online. One of the best ways to do that is to teach kids to ask who, what, and when questions about websites.

•Who created this site? Is it from an educational institution (.edu), a nonprofit (.org), or a commercial enterprise (.com)?

•What information does the site include? Can you find other sources that verify the information? (If you can only find a fact/story on one site, it's probably not reliable.) Is the site trying to sell something, or is the information there solely for educational purposes?

•When was the site last updated? Generally, the more updated the information is, the better.

Balance Research Sources

•Kids will hear this from their teachers, but you should reiterate that they need to balance research sources – and not just for their homework. They should look at different news sites so that they can get the full picture of a certain issue and different viewpoints, as well as verify what they've learned.

Is a Person Who They Say They Are?

•Just as information may not always be accurate, people may not always be who they say they are. Kids shouldn't assume that just because someone says they're 17 – or that they're a girl – that they really are.

Point Out All the Ways That Marketers Target Kids

•Kids need to recognize that they're being marketed to everywhere they turn – from traditional TV, print, and radio ads to product placements in TV shows and movies. Interactive ads blaze throughout online and gaming worlds, where sponsorships, contests, and product endorsements appear regularly. Ads also come to our kids disguised as "free" cell phone ring tones (in exchange for receiving text ads), surveys, and pass-along games and quizzes that capture email addresses when kids respond or forward them to each other (this is called viral marketing).

•Help kids learn to identify different types of advertising so that they can see through the hype.

64 % of high school students responding admitted to being careful about the things they post online

39 % said they advise friends about the content they post

32 % said they stopped interacting with friends who post inappropriate content online

44 % of high school students said they believe a positive digital profile is an important part of their future

2015 survey

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2015: 51% of companies use search engines and 52% use social media to find more information on their applicants. (Cyberbullying Research Center)

With all of this knowledge about digital citizenship we have this great opportunity to jump into action and make some real positive changes when it comes to getting involved in your child’s digital life.

We have an open road ahead of us. How do we create a positive school climate around digital technology? How do we use digital media to create and sustain positive, healthy, thriving communities?

Sample answers:

Ideas for families….

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Have the Talk

Gives parents talking points

Ideas for families….

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Click on image to go to the agreements

Ideas for families….

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Ideas for families….

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Ideas for families….

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Ideas for families….

Be Internet Awesome - Interland

Ideas for families….

Related info & activities: TheFamilyDinnerProject.org

Ideas for families….

Parental Controls

Apple Mac System Preferences

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Parental Controls

iPad and iPhone Settings

Link to Info

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Parental Controls

Windows

User Accounts

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Parental Controls

Chromebooks (Chrome Browser Settings)

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For more information...

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Q & A

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Media Credit

  • THINK before you by Thomas Galvez from Flickr.com
  • Fluorescent Traffic Cones (1) by Digital Nuisance from Flickr.com

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Contact Information

Karen Larson

klarson@sccoe.org

Gena Pacada

gpacada@sccoe.org

Santa Clara County Office of Education

Educational Technology Services Team

innovation.sccoe.org

Moreland Middle School

Rob Barelli

and you, parents & students

for being digital citizens that THINK!

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Dig Cit for Parents Moreland Middle School 2018 - Google Slides