Strategies Implemented by Canadian Occupational Therapists to Engage First Nations Clients in Therapy
**Please note that this questionnaire is an English translation of the French questionnaire**

Dear Canadian occupational therapists,

You are cordially invited to participate in a survey, under the direction of Julie Lapointe erg, OT (C), PhD. The purpose of this survey is to gather strategies that Canadian occupational therapists put in place in order to engage their patients in therapy. This project, carried out as part of a master's project in occupational therapy, aims to better understand the practice with the First Nations clientele, but also to determine if your strategies promote a culturally safe practice.

This survey is noteworthy seen as though engagement is an important component for the success of the occupational therapy intervention process. To this day, very little literature indicates how the clinician occupational therapist can promote commitment through concrete means. In addition, there is no current study of Canadian First Nations’ engagement in therapy. The results from your involvement in this survey will offer a current portrait of this clinical practice, while also helping to elaborate some reflections on the practice of occupational therapy with Canada's Native clientele. The information obtained can be used as a starting point for future studies on the effectiveness of the strategies that promote engagement in therapy, but will also allow all occupational therapists in Canada to take a critical look at their practice and to think about the involvement of their First Nations clients.

To participate in this survey, you will need to complete a 15-minute online survey. In order to obtain specific strategies for First Nations clients in Canada, occupational therapists who respond must: 1) be members of a professional order of occupational therapy; 2) have at least 1 year of work experience as an occupational therapist with First Nations clients in Canada. Please note that native clients are defined here as: Indigenous, Inuit or Métis living on-reserve or not. The participation in this study is voluntary, confidential and anonymous. You can withdraw by ignoring this invitation. You can also leave at any time during the completion of the questionnaire. In addition, be aware that by participating in the online survey, you consent to your responses being used as part of a Master’s integration project. The results of this study will be published in a twenty-page article submitted to the University of Montreal's testothèque library.

This Google Form link will be available from April 2nd to May 2nd.

Thank you for your interest in this research.
For more information, please contact Flavie St-Germain, Master's student in Occupational Therapy
flavie.st-germain@umontreal.ca
514-207-1436

Which College (s) or professional association (s) do you belong to?
How many years of practical experience do you have with First Nations clients (First Nations clientele being defined as Indigenous, Métis or Inuit living outside or on a reserve)? *
Your answer
What are the characteristics of the clientele with whom you worked? *
Required
In your service delivery, have you ever had difficulties engaging your First Nations clients in therapy?
Never
Always
Do you consider that the difficulties of engagement in therapy are frequent problems with the First Nations clientele?
Strongly disagree
Strongly agree
Have you ever had to change your clinical process to encourage engagement of your First Nations clients in therapy?
Never
Always
Have you ever had to change the way you contact and set guidelines with your First Nations clients to encourage their engagement in therapy for reasons other than motor or cognitive limitations?
Never
Always
Have you ever modified your data collection and analysis to encourage engagement of your First Nations clients for reasons other than motor or cognitive limitations?
Never
Always
Have you ever modified your intervention plan to encourage the engagement of your First Nations clients for reasons other than motor or cognitive limitations?
Never
Always
Have you ever used some of the following strategies to develop your practice in order to improve your First Nations clients' engagement in therapy?
Have you ever used some of the following strategies to initiate contact and to set guidelines for therapy in order to improve your First Nations clients’ engagement in therapy?
Have you ever used some of the following strategies to collect and analyze in order to improve your First Nations clients’ engagement in therapy?
Have you ever used some of the following strategies to determine the goals and intervention plan in order to improve for your First Nations client’s engagement in therapy?
What other strategie(s) have you used to engage your First Nations clients’ in therapy?
Your answer
The following questions will be related to the concept of cultural safety*
*This concept was implemented by Maori nurses working with Maori people in New Zealand. They argued that the health disparities experienced by their clients were the result of colonialism and chronic poverty, and that these have been misinterpreted as synonymous with Maori culture. This concept is generally associated, in Canada, with First Nations, and refers to a practice in which the health professional communicates with the client in a respectful and inclusive manner, empowers the client to make decisions and establishes a caregiving relationship in which they both work together to ensure maximum efficiency. (Beagan, B., 2015)
15) Do you feel you offer a culturally safe practice, a practice based on the concept of "cultural safety" ?
Strongly disagree
Strongly agree
What do you believe should be implemented by health professionals in order to offer a culturally safe practice?
Your answer
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