March 28, 2019 BSUG: OpenStudio SDK - Tips and Tricks for Easier Modeling with Ruby Scripts
DESCRIPTION:
The presentation will help demystify the use of the OpenStudio Software Development Kit (SDK) by energy modelers to save time and improve their modeling workflows, informing architects and engineers about the capabilities of the simulation tool for design studies. It will address questions such as: what is the OpenStudio SDK; what are OpenStudio Measures; how do I get started with using Ruby and OpenStudio for creating and extracting information from energy models; and, what resources are available to help? The session is geared toward non-programmers who like the idea of letting their computers do more work.

BIO:
Eric Ringold:

Eric is a Senior Engineer at kW Engineering, and has eight years’ experience developing sophisticated energy models to evaluate the performance of new and existing buildings to meet local codes, third-party certification, and client goals. Eric’s experience spans projects of all sizes including educational, laboratory, airport terminal, healthcare, hospitality, municipal and commercial office buildings. He is passionate about developing custom scripted workflows to quickly and accurately create detailed building energy models, and using those models to impact energy efficiency decisions.


TIME: 12:00 - 1:00 pm MT
LOCATION: UI - IDL | 306 S. 6th St.

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