Remote Court Survey for the General Public
Illinois courts are committed to continuing to offer remote court appearances by phone or videoconference technology (for example: Zoom or Skype). Help us refine rules and policies by completing this short survey.

NOTE: This survey is for members of the general public, including self-represented litigants, jurors, and individuals who may never have had any contact with Illinois courts. Lawyers and other legal professionals should fill out the survey available at: https://forms.gle/4wjDH42fZVCgCCsx8.
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1. Which county do you live in? *
2. What is your age? *
3. What technology do you have access to? You may check more than one. *
Required
4. Since March 2020, what videoconference technology (with both video and audio) have you used for meetings or appointments? You may check more than one. *
Required
5. When using videoconference technology (with both video and audio) for a meeting or appointment, how comfortable do you feel? *
6. Have you ever had to go to court to: *
Yes
No
Handle a parking/traffic ticket?
Appear as a party to a family case (for example: divorce, child custody, child support)?
Appear as a party to any other type of civil lawsuit (for example: small claims, eviction, foreclosure)?
Appear as a party to a criminal case (for example: misdemeanor, felony)?
Participate in any court case not as a party (for example: as a witness or family member)
Report for jury duty or serve on a jury?
Other (please describe below)? Choose "No" if you have not had any other experience going to court.
6.a. If you answered "Other" above, please describe when you had to go to court.
7. Please tell us if you would face any of these problems if you had to attend court in-person at the courthouse. You may check more than one. *
Required
8. Please tell us if you would face any of these problems if you had to attend court remotely by phone or videoconference technology. You may check more than one. *
Required
9. Would you use videoconference technology to handle court business for: *
Yes
No
It depends
Reporting for jury screening?
Serving on a jury, if you are selected?
Attending an arbitration or mediation?
Appearing for your own court case?
9. a. If you answered "It depends" above, please explain here.
10. Tell us whether you would prefer to appear in-person at the courthouse or remotely by videoconference technology if you had a court case in the following types of cases: *
Remotely by videoconference technology
In-person at the courthouse
Child custody
Divorce
Eviction
Small claims
Consumer debt
Probate and estate
Order of protection or other domestic violence related case
Criminal case
Traffic ticket
Juvenile case
11. Would you feel like you were at a disadvantage if: *
Yes
No
I don't know
You appeared for a court case by phone (with audio only) and the other side of the case appeared by videoconference technology (with both video and audio)?
You appeared for a court case by phone (with audio only) and the other side of the case appeared in-person at the courthouse?
You appeared for a court case by videoconference technology (with both video and audio) and the other side of the case appeared in-person at the courthouse?
12. If you answered "Yes" above, please explain why you would feel disadvantaged.
13. Since March 2020, have you attended a court hearing using videoconference technology (with both video and audio) or by phone (with audio only)? You may check more than one. *
Required
14. How would you rate your experience with videoconferencing for your court hearing (with both video and audio)? *
15. How would you rate your experience with calling in for your court hearing (with audio only)? *
16. Please rate the following statement: Courts should continue to hold hearings by videoconference because it allows them to hear more cases, resolve cases more quickly, and it makes it easier for people to participate without having to travel to a courthouse, take time off work, or find childcare. *
17. Please rate the following statement: Courts should stop holding hearings by videoconference because technology problems can disrupt the whole system, not everyone can use this technology, and people are less likely to take videoconference hearings as seriously as if they had to appear in a courtroom in person. *
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