Code4Lib 2020 Pre-Conference Voting
Thank you for voting for the Code4Lib 2020 pre-conference seminars.

For each submission, vote to indicate how interested you would be in attending this pre-conference seminar at Code4Lib 2020. (0 = not interested, 3 = highly interested).

Email addresses will be used only to send submission receipts and to validate against duplicate submissions.

Voting closes November 19, 2019, at 11:59pm Pacific time.
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Fail4Lib 2020: Hindsight
Description:
Everyone experiences failure in their professional lives, but no one likes to talk about it. When we see failure approaching, we distance ourselves, avert our eyes, or -- if we're in its path -- brace for the worst. But failure has intrinsic value and is an essential step on the path to professional and organizational success. And since it’s inevitable, we ought to learn how to look back on our failures to derive value from them, and how to look ahead so that our past failures can inform our future successes. Fail4Lib, now in its 8th year, is the perennial Code4Lib pre-conference dedicated to discussing and coming to terms with the failures that we all encounter in our professional lives. It is a safe space for us to explore failure, to talk about our own experiences with failure, and to encourage enlightened risk taking. The goal of Fail4Lib is for participants – and their organizations – to get better at failing gracefully, so that when we do fail, we do so in a way that moves us forward. This half-day pre-conference will consist of case studies, round-table discussions, and, for those interested in sharing, lightning talks on failures we’ve dealt with in our own work. Both newcomers and Fail4Lib veterans are welcome.

Prerequisites:
Participants are expected to have experienced failure in the past. In addition, prerequisite readings will be provided ahead of the session.

Session Length:
1/2 Day (3 hours)
Not Interested
Highly Interested
Introduction to natural language processing with spaCy - A fast and accessible library that integrates modern machine learning technology
Description:
This half-day tutorial will introduce participants to spaCy, a free and open-source library for text analysis. Developed by Matthew Hannibal and Ines Montari in Berlin, spaCy offers a suite of tools for applied natural language processing (NLP) that are fast, practical and allow for quick experimentation and evaluation of language models. These tools make it possible for individuals to quickly train models that can infer customized categories in named entity recognition tasks, match phrases, and visualize model performance. While comparable to the Natural Language Toolkit (NLTK), spaCy offers neural network models, integrated word vectors, dependency parsing and a variety of new features that are not available elsewhere. Participants will learn how to use spaCy for common research tasks and gain an understanding of how spaCy compares with other tools for NLP. We will also work with Prodigy, which is an annotation and active learning tool from the makers of spaCy. Prodigy allows a single researcher to quickly fine-tune a model for greater accuracy on a specific task or to train new categories and entities for recognition. I have taught this workshop twice before, first as a three-hour workshop at DH2019 in Utrecht and then a day-and-a-half-long version at DH Budapest.

Prerequisites:
Python

Session Length:
1/2 Day (3 hours)

Not Interested
Highly Interested
Learn to automate with Ansible
Description:
Join our DevOps team from Princeton for a one-day, hands-on workshop. You’ll get a comprehensive overview of Ansible and then dive into an overview of creating roles to manage your infrastructure and/or applications. You will be equipped with the skills to take this back to your organization and implement right away.

Prerequisites:
Comfort with a POSIX compliant terminal, A reasonably powered laptop (at least 8GB of RAM), Full Administrator Rights on the laptop. We will make accommodations for AWS accounts but there's venue network implications to deal with here.

Session Length:
Full Day (6 hours)
Not Interested
Highly Interested
ReCiter: an open source author disambiguation system for academic institutions
Description:
ReCiter is a highly accurate, machine-learning system for inferring which publications in PubMed a given person has authored. ReCiter includes a Java application, a DynamoDB-hosted database, and a set of RESTful microservices which allow institutions to maintain accurate and up-to-date author publication lists for thousands of people. This software is optimized for disambiguating authorship in PubMed and, optionally, Scopus. ReCiter rapidly and accurately identifies articles, including those at previous affiliations, by a given person. It does this by leveraging institutionally maintained identity data (e.g., departments, relationships, email addresses, year of degree, etc.) With the more complete and efficient searches that result from combining these types of data, individuals at institutions can save time and be more productive. Running ReCiter daily, one can ensure that the desired users are the first to learn when a new publication has appeared in PubMed. ReCiter is freely available and open source under the Apache 2.0 license. https://github.com/wcmc-its/ReCiter For our presentation, we will demonstrate: * How to install ReCiter locally or using an AWS Cloud Formation template (free AWS promotional codes provided) * How to load ReCiter with identity data * How to run ReCiter * Its API outputs * How ReCiter integrates with a React/Node.js third-party interface for capturing feedback, feedback which is fed back into ReCiter to further improve accuracy.

Prerequisites:
We include a list of software that should be installed on your laptop here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1huRS-37jBnX7BREAvgNfRxE0l18ESsoSLlUGqMhkhOw/edit#heading=h.kl26848k6tu5

Session Length:
1/2 Day (3 hours)
Not Interested
Highly Interested
Using & hacking the Distant Reader
Description:
The Distant Reader is a high performance computing system which takes an arbitrary amount of unstructured data (text) as input, and outputs sets of structured data for analysis. Put another way, the Reader consumes just about any number of files in any just about any format, and it outputs plain text files, delimited files, a relational database, and a set of HTML reports all for the purposes of systematic reading.

The first half of this workshop will be on the use of the Distant Reader. Attendees will learn how to submit content to the Reader, and then how to interact with the HTML reports. Thus, attendees will be able to ""read"" dozens of websites, hundreds of books, thousands of journal articles, or just about anything on their computer.

The second half of the workshop will be on hacking the Reader's structured data. Given the plain text files, tab-delimited files, and relational database the Reader also outputs, attendees will learn how to do various visualizations against the data, subset the data with SQL, index the data with Solr, normalize the data with OpenRefine, use machine learning against the data, etc., all for the purposes of more in-depth analysis. It is our sincere hope attendees -- given some instruction -- will exploit the structured data and create interesting hacks of their own.

Prerequisites:
Attendees only need to bring their laptop computer; no programming experience is necessary.

Session Length:
1/2 Day (3 hours)
Not Interested
Highly Interested
Solr Performance and Scalability
Description:
Bring your Solr problems (and solutions if you have them), and join your colleagues to discuss the challenges we've faced getting Solr to perform at scale, how we've tried to address the problems, what's worked, and what hasn't worked. Possible topics for this unconference-style session include query strategies, Solr configuration, application configuration (e.g. Blacklight or other discovery apps that use Solr), SolrCloud or other clustering approaches, and Java tuning.

Prerequisites:
This workshop is for users with working Solr instances, and assumes knowledge of Solr installation, configuration, and querying.

Session Length:
1/2 Day (3 hours)
Not Interested
Highly Interested
Multi-Site Mania: A Modular Strategy for Creating (and Maintaining) Consistency Across Platforms
Description:
Managing a consistent web presence across multiple platforms, technologies, and departments is hard. Once you reach a certain volume, even basic updates between all of your sites becomes a big task, and maintaining a cohesive look/feel and branding can seem out of reach.

In this workshop, I’ll share our strategy for multi-site management at BU Libraries and introduce the technologies that have helped us to significantly decrease our sites’ maintenance and development costs while greatly improving their usability and branding.

Working on an example “library” on four main “sites”, we’ll use Web Components, Javascript modules, and NPM to drastically simplify, track, automate, and extend their administration. By breaking the webpage into pieces, we’ll take greater ownership of our content, moving it out of each proprietary silo and into an environment with greater reliability and control.

By the end of the workshop, we’ll have created several static, dynamic, and interactive widgets and deployed them to each of our sites. Circling back, we’ll contrast our new modular approach with what we started with - comparing the time and effort it takes to achieve a similar (or even better) results by each method. Time willing, we’ll discuss alternative strategies and complications.

Prerequisites:
equipment: laptop (recommended), github account (optional);
knowledge: javascript, html, css, npm.

Session Length:
1/2 Day (3 hours)
Not Interested
Highly Interested
Solr for newbies
Description:
This is an introductory workshop to Solr, the fast and open source search platform that powers a lot of library products. This workshop is geared to anyone that has never used Solr, or uses it but has not explored some of the features that Solr offers out of the box.

We’ll start the workshop with a quick review on how Solr stores data and the process that it goes through when a search is submitted.

We’ll then go through a tour of the main features in Solr:
* Indexing your data: where all of it starts
* Solr’s document-based data model and what that means to you
* How to configure fields for different needs (ever wonder what the “_t” means in a Solr field and how it’s different from a “_s” field?)
* What are Search Request Handlers and Query parsers (ever been puzzled by dismax vs edismax?)
* What’s the difference between the “q” and “fq” parameters when you search
* How to debug queries and figure out why the resulting documents are being picked (or not)
* How to tweak the ranking of results
* How to use facets, synonyms, hit highlighting, and search suggestions

Prerequisites:
While practical, this workshop does not require you to be a coder. The idea is for you to learn the concepts, features, and how they work. If you choose, we’ll show you how to install Solr on your machine to experiment with the concepts as we go. But if you prefer not to install Solr (or updating configuration files is not your thing) you can still follow along and learn with us.

Session Length:
1/2 Day (3 hours)
Not Interested
Highly Interested
Building a full-stack Serverless Web application with React and AWS
Description:
Serverless computing allows you to build Web applications without managing or maintaining servers. Using AWS, we can build and deploy responsive applications in the cloud with built-in high availability and flexible scaling capabilities.

In this workshop, we will learn how to build a full-stack serverless Web application using React and several AWS services, including AWS Amplify, Lambda, AppSync, DynamoDB, etc. We’ll start the workshop with a quick overview of serverless computing and AWS, followed by creating a React application, integrating with AWS managed services and deploying this application in AWS.

Workshop Agenda:
Introduction to AWS, Serverless, AWS Amplify, and React
Section 1: Create your first React application and setup AWS Amplify
Section 2: Setup access controls for your application
Section 3: Introduction to GraphQL and AWS AppSync
Section 4: Perform data mutations for your application
Section 5: Introduction to multiple development environments
Wrap-up and discussion

Prerequisites:
A laptop, a text editor E.g. Vi/Vim, Sublime Text or Visual Studio Code, Node and NPM installed

Session Length:
1/2 Day (3 hours)
Not Interested
Highly Interested
Introduction to User Experience Design
Description:
In this half-day long session, we will be providing practical guidelines and tools to help you effectively plan and incorporate successful user experience design methods. We will provide an overview of the UX design process along with hands-on exercises to practice using the techniques covered. Particular emphasis will be placed on user-centered library services. No prior experience needed.

Outline:
- Overview of UX
- Requirements gathering
- Designing alternatives via wireframes
- Usability testing
- Evaluation
- Implementation

Prerequisites:
None

Session Length:
1/2 Day (3 hours)
Not Interested
Highly Interested
Developing with the new app framework for Alma
Description:
Ex Libris has announced support for apps which will be hosted on their platform and which can extend the functionality of Alma and other library systems. In this session, we'll explore the beta version of the SDK and together build an app to add features which fulfill the requirements of our users.

Prerequisites:
The app SDK uses JavaScript, HTML, and CSS. While it is Angular-based, no prior knowledge is Angular is required. Each participant should have a computer with Node and NPM installed.

Session Length:
1/2 Day (3 hours)
Not Interested
Highly Interested
Accessing web archives with Internet Archive & Archive-It APIs
Description:
This workshop will introduce participants to tools for using web archives, with a particular focus on tools to facilitate access to web archives. Using real life use cases, Web Archivists from the Internet Archive will demonstrate Internet Archive and Archive-It APIs and integrations for use in creating access points to web archives, organizing and moving files, facilitating full-text search, and sharing metadata. Participants will work directly with the tools, as well as related code and file formats, in this half-day, hands-on workshop. The day will also include time for introduction to web archives and their technologies for beginners, and feedback on further developing these web archiving APIs going forward. By the end of the day, participants will be able to identify and interact with web archive APIs, with concrete ideas for future custom implementation at their libraries. All skill levels are welcome, but a base understanding of web conventions is necessary to get the most out of this workshop.

Prerequisites:
Laptop

Session Length:
1/2 Day (3 hours)
Not Interested
Highly Interested
Get Results! with Elastic Search
Description:
In this hands-on workshop we will go through the process of building a search app using the Elasticsearch open-source engine. We will cover how to set up Elasticsearch; how to create a local development environment using Docker containers; how to index data from the Library of Congress and how to query our Elasticsearch instance from a web application.

Prerequisites:
-Familiarity with a modern programming language
-Docker installed in your laptop
-Internet connection

Session Length:
1/2 Day (3 hours)
Not Interested
Highly Interested
Open-source Tools for Searching and Accessing Web of Science Data
Description:
The Web of Science (WoS) is a trusted source for publication and citation metadata of scholarly works dating back to 1900. The multidisciplinary database covers all areas of science, as well as social sciences, and the arts and humanities. WoS is comprised of works published in over 20,000 journals, as well as books and conferences. In 2019, the Clarivate Web of Science Group released a new RESTful API that makes obtaining and reusing citation metadata easier and more accessible for developers and data librarians.

In this workshop, participants will be introduced to the new WoS APIs, the metadata available, and the new API registration process. Workshop participants will gain hands-on experience using Python script libraries available for searching and accessing the Web of Science. We will also cover accessing data, such as citation counts and impact factors, from our benchmarking and analytics service, InCites.

Please bring a laptop with Python3 installed. While a subscription is required for access to the Web of Science and InCites, all participants will be provided with temporary API credentials for the workshop.

Prerequisites:
Laptop, Python installed

Session Length:
1/2 Day (3 hours)
Not Interested
Highly Interested
Creating Inclusive User Personas for Research Data Technology in Libraries
Description:
User personas are an effective technique for understanding the target audience and use cases for a library technology service. Libraries offering technological services and platforms for research data, such as Overleaf, Electronic Lab Notebooks, and programming workshops can benefit from creating user personas for those estimated to use these library technology services. However, user personas often minimize or even ignore the diverse needs of individuals engaging with research data, including but not limited to considerations for accessibility, disability, sociocultural influences, age, and LGBTQ+ populations. Creating inclusive user personas not only benefits a library when designing more effective educational and outreach programs surrounding their research data technology services, but ensures their researcher population can feel fully represented within library education surrounding these technologies.

The session will begin with an overview of user personas, examples of user personas developed for research data technology in libraries, and a discussion of the ways in which these personas may under-represent or even erase the wide range of technology needs of their users. By the end of the workshop, participants can expect to gain hands-on experience developing inclusive and representative user personas for their own research data technologies in their libraries.


Prerequisites:
Prior exposure to user personas is not required for this workshop. It is suggested to bring a laptop with text editing software (such as Word or Google Docs) for creating user personas, but the workshop facilitator will also provide sketch paper and writing utensils for creating them by hand.

Session Length:
1/2 Day (3 hours)
Not Interested
Highly Interested
Running Code Clubs
Description:
If you are running a code club at your library, or would like to, this workshop and discussion will be a great place to get tips for things that have worked, as well as how to avoid things that haven't worked out well.

At the Richmond (BC) Public Library we run three code clubs, one for kids, one for teens, and one for adults. Each has its own flavour and pitfalls, but all are focused on providing a space for members to bring their own projects and work on them with the help of a mentor if they get stuck (or to help them level up). We also get attendees who have never coded before and are curious to learn what computer programming is all about. But the essence of these programs is that they are clubs, not classes.

We also do have more structured classes teaching Scratch, Game Design for Pico-8, essentials of HTML/CSS, and building text adventure games, among others. These feed into the coding clubs for anyone who wants to carry on after the 3-4 sessions of the class have finished.

We have run the clubs as both registration-only and drop-in programs, and both as fairly structured tutorials or do-your-own thing clubs. It will be great to share the experiences we've had and hear more from other participants about what has and hasn't worked for their code clubs.

Prerequisites:
No special requirements besides experience running a code club, or a desire to start a code club. A laptop or tablet with a browser may be helpful but is not required.

Session Length:
1/2 Day (3 hours)
Not Interested
Highly Interested
A Static Web Approach to Digital Collections: Hands-On with CollectionBuilder
Description:
Looking for an agile, lightweight approach to developing digital collections and scholarship projects? Join us for a hands-on deep dive into CollectionBuilder, an open source project for generating digital collection websites driven by metadata and powered by modern static web technology.

Optimized for non-developers and simple hosting solutions, CollectionBuilder allows librarians, researchers, and educators to take ownership over their digital projects by lowering barriers to website creation and customization: users need only create a spreadsheet of metadata and corresponding directory of digital files to generate a digital collection. Once these are uploaded to CollectionBuilder, the platform employs a Jekyll static web generator to build a website for browsing and contextualizing the collection.

As workshop participants engage with CollectionBuilder, they will learn fundamental web and DH skills by working with plain text files, CSV data, Markdown, GitHub, and GitHub Pages to create and customize their very own digital collection. By the end of this workshop, participants will have gained the knowledge and independence necessary to implement CollectionBuilder in contexts that include creating and disseminating research collections and custom digital exhibits, or teaching digital libraries in the classroom. No programming experience is necessary; beginners from any background are welcome. Participants are asked to bring their own computers.

Prerequisites:
Participants should bring laptops and should create a Google Drive account and GitHub account prior to the workshop session.

Session Length:
1/2 Day (3 hours)
Not Interested
Highly Interested
Practical Privacy And Security For You And Your Library
Description:
We all know we should use good passwords, keep our things updated, and follow other basic precautions
while online; however, understanding the reasons behind these rules is critical to help us convince
ourselves and others that the extra work is indeed worth it. This session will cover securing you & your
library. Keeping your data, network, website, and computers safe and private. We'll talk about some security
myths, passwords, tracking, malware, and will cover a range of tools and techniques that everyone can do to improve their digital lives.

Prerequisites:
None

Session Length:
1/2 Day (3 hours)
Not Interested
Highly Interested
Pi-hole Privacy: Tampering is a Good Thing
Description:
As digital platforms become increasingly evasive at harvesting user data, libraries have a duty to assist patrons in defending their digital privacy. Members of the Library Freedom Institute will discuss how far industries have overreached in building their online empires of distraction and surveillance with emerging technologies such as facial recognition and machine learning algorithms. We will explore the barriers that exist around safeguarding digital privacy.

In addition, we will embark on a hands-on demonstration in which attendees will learn how to deploy their own DNS sinkhole that can protect their devices from unwanted content. It is recommended that attendees bring laptops as they will have hands-on experience installing a network-wide adblocker (Pi-hole) using command line scripts.

We are committed to making this a low-barrier session for those who are interested in educating themselves and their communities to make informed choices about privacy. The Library Freedom Institute is an IMLS grant-funded initiative and a community of librarians focused on privacy issues and privacy-centered education and practices.

Prerequisites:
Attendees are encouraged to bring laptops, as there will be hands-on interactions with Raspberry Pi Zeros computers.

Session Length:
1/2 Day (3 hours)
Not Interested
Highly Interested
Intro to Photogrammetry
Description:
What is Photogrammetry? Photogrammetry is a cost-effective method in the rendering of physical objects or structures into digital 3-D models with a variety of purposes, from use in research and 3-D printing to applications in video games and other formats of digital media. As we move forward into an ever-increasing digital world, it is easy to imagine that our library preservation practices will include some form of photogrammetry.

In this workshop, participants will learn some of the basics of photogrammetry, including a description of the tools utilized and techniques practiced. Additionally, we will show how to build and process a 3-D model from images.

No technical expertise is required of participants.

Prerequisites:
If possible, participants should bring:

A laptop with a free 30-day trial of Agisoft Metashape Pro already installed. Software can be downloaded at: https://www.agisoft.com/downloads/installer/
A device capable of taking photographs (e.g. - a camera or a smartphone) and the necessary accessories to transfer these photos to your laptop.
A small object to digitize (if you can’t bring an object, one will be provided).


Session Length:
1/2 Day (3 hours)
Not Interested
Highly Interested
Microaggressions; let’s do more than just talk about them.
Description:
The intention of this workshop is to create a safe, inclusive space to discuss and address, the subtle and covert forms of discrimination, also known as microaggressions, that many of us deal with on a daily basis as members of marginalized groups.

This half day workshop will take a hands on dive into the following topics:
• What microaggressions are
• Recognizing acts of microaggressions in ourselves
• Recognizing acts of microaggressions from others
• Why how we approach microaggressions matters
• Exercises to practice ways to address them, whether in ourselves or in others.
• Tactics or Approaches to providing productive support to victims
• Understanding how this form of discrimination has a ripple effect.

Prerequisites:
Those who attend this workshop will assume good intentions of everyone else in the workshop. We will be discussing a sensitive subject and that is a prerequisite.

Session Length:
1/2 Day (3 hours)
Not Interested
Highly Interested
Introduction to Mukurtu CMS
Description:
Mukurtu CMS (mukurtu.org) is an open source content management system that allows communities to share, manage, license and curate their digital heritage and stories using their own cultural protocols, languages, and social values. This workshop is meant to be a comprehensive but approachable introduction to Mukurtu CMS. Participants will explore how Mukurtu CMS can facilitate collaborative curation projects, language revitalization efforts, and other community driven digital projects. The grassroots-driven development process of Mukurtu CMS, and plans for future development will also be discussed.

Participants will have the opportunity for hands-on experience using Mukurtu CMS to create and manage digital resources, and a walk through of installing and configuring Mukurtu CMS in a development environment.

Mukurtu CMS is a platform built on Drupal 7 and participants will be installing Mukurtu CMS using Acquia Dev Desktop on a Macintosh or Windows laptop. Linux users will install Mukurtu CMS on a LAMP-like environment using supplied instructions.

Prerequisites:
Participants should bring a laptop (with credentials that allow of software installation). A general understanding of current digital library practices and standards would be helpful.

Session Length:
1/2 Day (3 hours)
Not Interested
Highly Interested
The Double-edged Sword of Data Analytics: Creating Meaningful Data Mashups While Maintaining User Privacy
Description:
Libraries and their parent organizations are collecting a lot of data and analyzing it to make more data-driven decisions, improve student outcomes, increase data quality, and enhance user experiences. As libraries collect and analyze all this data, how do they ensure user privacy and still best serve their communities? Also, how do they leverage internal data at their organizations and data from external sources together to support strategic goals?

By the end of this workshop, participants will know the types of data sets available in library ecosystems, be able to assess and mitigate risks associated with data sets containing personally identifiable information, and understand techniques and tools used to extract data from different systems. They will also learn how to transform and load the data from these different systems into analytical tools such as OpenRefine, Kibana, and Apache Spark to create data mashups that can provide meaningful insights.

Prerequisites:
Laptop computer with Open Refine installed, Amazon Web Services account (desirable)

Session Length:
1/2 Day (3 hours)
Not Interested
Highly Interested
Library Carpentry: The UNIX Shell lesson
Description:
This session will introduce participants to the Unix Shell, a tool that can automate tasks like copying, moving, renaming, counting, searching through, or otherwise processing files. Participants will learn the basics of the Unix shell, understand why and how to use the command line, use shell commands to work with directories and files, and use shell commands to find and manipulate data.

For more details, see the full lesson at https://librarycarpentry.org/lc-shell/

Prerequisites:
Participants will need a laptop with the Bash shell. Bash is the default shell on most Linux distributions and macOS. Windows users will need to install Git Bash to provide a UNIX-like environment. Participants will receive installation instructions prior to the workshop.

Session Length:
1/2 Day (3 hours)
Not Interested
Highly Interested
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