Important characteristics and common faults of supermarket equipment and systems - ASHRAE 1615 RP
Thank you for taking a few minutes to complete this questionnaire. It contains 11 questions about typical supermarket systems and common faults to be detected. This is an opinion-based survey, and we hope to gain your thoughts and opinions for all of the questions. However, if you prefer not to answer a question, please leave it blank and proceed to the next question. At the end, please click the submit button. Some questions include a hint text to help you clearly understand the question. If you need assistance as you complete the questionnaire, you can contact us via phone 402-203-2038 or email at abehfar@unomaha.edu.
Section I - Refrigeration and HVAC Systems
(9 questions)
What portion of stores use the following refrigeration system types?
Centralized system: Compressor racks in a central mechanical room. Distributed system: Compressors in the close proximity of loads. Indirect or secondary system: Glycol, CO2 or other heat transfer fluids in the secondary loop. This includes central or distributed systems with secondary loop. It also includes cascade systems. Self-contained cabinets: Condenser and compressor at location of cabinet.
More than 75%
50 to 75%
25 to 50%
Less than 25%
None
Centralized direct expansion (DX) system
Distributed direct expansion (DX) system
Indirect or secondary system
Self-contained refrigeration systems
Which is the most typical method for the capacity control of parallel compressors?
What portion of stores use the following condenser types and condensing pressure control methods?
Please consider stores in various climatic conditions to answer this question (not a specific climate)
More than 75%
50 to 75%
25 to 50%
Less than 25%
None
Air-cooled condenser controlled by cycling fan motor(s)
Air-cooled condenser controlled by air throttling or bypassing
Air-cooled condenser controlled by coil flooding
Air-cooled condenser controlled by varying the fan motor(s) speed
Evaporative condenser controlled by cycling the fan or spray pump motors
Evaporative condenser controlled by bypassing air around duct and dampers, or by throttling air via dampers, on either inlet or discharge
What portion of stores maintain the condensing temperature based on the following options?
More than 75%
50 to 75%
25 to 50%
Less than 25%
None
Fixed head pressure control: A constant setpoint (e.g. 85 degree F)
Floating head pressure control: Variable setpoint control based on the ambient conditions
Which is the most typical defrost in the following cabinets?
Off-Cycle (random or planned)
Electric (external heat)
Hot-gas (internal heat)
Medium-temperature cabinets
Low-temperature cabinets
What portion of refrigerant flow control devices are mechanical or electronic?
A traditional valve type includes mechanical thermostatic expansion valves (TEVs) or evaporator pressure regulators (EPRs). In recent years, new stores use electronically controlled electric valves such as EEVs or EEPRs.
More than 75%
50 to 75%
25 to 50%
Less than 25%
Mechanical valves
Electronically controlled electric valves
What portion of stores use the following energy-saving strategies?
More than 75%
50 to 75%
25 to 50%
Less than 25%
None
Liquid-suction heat exchangers (LSHXs) or liquid sub-coolers
"Demand defrost" to reduce defrost requirements
Electrically commuted fan motors (ECM) for evaporators
Refrigeration heat reclaim for space heating
Refrigeration heat reclaim for service hot water
What portion of stores use the following heating, cooling, and dehumidification HVAC systems?
More than 75%
50 to 75%
25 to 50%
Less than 25%
None
Rooftop air-conditioning units (RTUs)
Air Handling Units (AHUs) served by a chiller(s)
Air-source or water-source heat pumps (HPs)
Dehumidification units
What portion of stores use the following HVAC supply air systems?
VAV: variable air volume. DOAS: dedicated outdoor air system
More than 75%
50 to 75%
25 to 50%
Less than 25%
None
Single duct VAV system with terminal boxes served by AHUs or RTUs
Dual-duct VAV system with terminal boxes served by an AHU(s)
Single duct constant air volume system served by AHUs or RTUs
Fan coil units and DOAS system
Section II - Common Refrigeration System Faults
(2 questions)
What percentage of equipment failures is due to the following faults?
More than 75%
50 to 75%
25 to 50%
Less than 25%
None
Control system problems (controller electronics or control settings)
Refrigerant problems (leakage, undercharge, or overcharge)
Compressor problems (e.g. inefficient or dead compressor)
Oil problems
Condenser fouling
Condenser fan or fan motor problem
Iced-up evaporator or evaporator fouling
Case evaporator fan or fan motor problem
Faulty refrigerant-control valves (e.g. TEVs or EPRs)
Liquid line restriction
Cabinet glass door frosting
Faulty/inefficient interaction between HVAC and refrigeration systems (e.g. high store humidity)
Please choose the top four most costly faults to repair.
If a fault is not within the top four, please choose "Not within the top four" option.
First most costly repair
Second most costly repair
Third most costly repair
Fourth most costly repair
Not within the top four
Control system problems (controllers electronics or control settings)
Refrigerant problems (leakage, undercharge, or overcharge)
Compressor problems (e.g. inefficient or dead compressor)
Oil problems
Condenser fouling
Condenser fan or fan motor problem
Iced-up evaporator or evaporator fouling
Case evaporator fan or fan motor problem
Faulty refrigerant-control valves (e.g. TEVs or EPRs)
Liquid line restriction
Cabinet glass door frosting
Faulty/inefficient interaction between HVAC and refrigeration systems (e.g. high store humidity)
Please provide the following information. The information you provide will be kept confidential by researchers (it won't be provided to ASHRAE). Thank you!
First and Last name *
Your answer
Company name and position *
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Date *
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