Sheldon Sculpture Hunt
Follow the clues to find outdoor sculpture throughout the University of Nebraska-Lincoln campus and create your own sculpture tour. When you find the right artwork, fill in the title and artist.

As you explore, take a photo of yourself, or your group, with your favorites and share with us on Instagram @SheldonMuseum #SelfiesAtSheldon

What other sculptures do you like around campus? Share them with us!

*For an outdoor sculpture map, visit:
https://sheldonartmuseum.org/pdf/20_Sculpture_map_D.pdf
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Name/Team Name
Provide your name, or give your group a team name, so we know who you are when you come back to the museum to get your poster!
DON'T BE A SLEEPY HEAD
Let’s give you an easy one to get started, but don’t go getting a “big head” or anything, these won’t all be this easy.

One can see connections to ancient sculpture ruins, especially giant Olmec heads, in this large-scale, sleeping work.

One of the first things you probably notice is the scale of this sculpture.

This sculpture seems to be lacking something.

If you can’t see Sheldon’s front doors you’ve gone too far.
Title and Artist
LITTLE ARIA
This work includes dark, bird-like forms that whirl around the sculpture, lifting upward towards the sky.

The shape of this work takes the form of a large vase... or maybe a tornado.

The Sheldon provides a good backdrop for this swirling sculpture.

Did you know... The bird-like forms derive from the artist’s interest in Iowa’s burial and effigy mounds built by Native Americans between 1000 and 1300 to commemorate the dead.
Title and Artist
O SAY CAN YOU SEE?
Contrary to popular belief/practice, this sculpture does not show all the letters of the alphabet (at least that was never the artist's intention).

This work towers over campus at 35 feet tall.

Any Husker can appreciate the color of this work of art.

This work is named after the United States Flag, can you guess why?

Did you know... The artist of this work majored in philosophy while also studying sculpture.
Title and Artist
A LITTLE TIPSY?
It may look like it’s about to fall over (given the 3-degree angle it’s placed at), but don’t worry, this sculpture’s walls are held in place by steel girders sunk twenty feet in the ground.

This sculpture lies at the intersection of several walkways on campus.

This sculpture utilizes industrial materials, with each Cor-Ten steel wall weighing 20 tons.

Enter at your own risk, rumor has it if you walk through this sculpture you won’t graduate on time, but we strongly encourage you to take that risk.

Did you know... This sculpture is named for the section in Brooklyn in which the artist’s warehouse is located.
Title and Artist
THAT'S NOT NATURAL
You might miss this sculpture between the library and Andrews Hall, as it blends in with the trees around it.

Made of stainless steel, it stands 40ft tall.

While it resembles the natural forms around it, there is one thing that seems to be missing.
Title and Artist
SURF'S UP!
While some think this looks like a giant concrete surfboard, the artist of this work was actually inspired by prehistoric tools, though you may not know that from the ambiguous title.

This work is made of six tons of modified concrete and galvanized steel.

The work horizontally stretches 35 feet.

You may see this work as you are heading to the union after a long day of studying at the library.
Title and Artist
BLOWING IN THE WIND
You’re probably going to need a bigger pen, if you’re writing on these pages.

This work sits on the edge of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln campus and downtown Lincoln.

Again, the scale of the work is probably one of the first things you notice.

The subject of this work seems quite appropriate for a campus sculpture.

Did you know... There are several references to the artists’ visits to Nebraska. The writing contains words like wind, clouds and buffalo, and also the outline of the torn pages reproduces the Platte River.
Title and Artist
WHY SO BLUE?
The face of this figure is a color you might not expect, providing a colorful component to Sheldon’s sculpture garden.

If you’re facing the front of this work, you might have to look up to see it.

This sculpture is definitely larger-than-life.

Did you know... The artist of this work has other sculptures in downtown Lincoln. Look for the giant colorful tower close to campus.
Title and Artist
DON'T TURN YOUR BACK ON ME!
You’ll have to move into a sunken area to view this work.

Is it part of the wall? Floating off the wall? Going into the wall?

The twisted pose of this figure would really give your back a good stretch.

No head, no feet, but still beautiful.

Did you know... This sculpture was chosen as an entry for the U.S. Sculpture Pavilion of the Brussels International and Universal Exhibition of 1957, the first World’s Fair held since 1939.
Title and Artist
A FEW MORE QUESTIONS...
Are you a UNL student?
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Have you been to a First Friday at Sheldon before?
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Why do you attend First Fridays?
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THANKS FOR PARTICIPATING! How did you do? For answers, see https://go.unl.edu/sculpture_hunt2_answers.
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