2017 C-START Summer PD Workshop Registration
Register for a Summer 2017 C-START Computer Science Workshop here. Details on each option are listed on the C-START web page at http://tech.mines.edu/cstart/ (under Summer PD link).

Contact cstart@mines.edu with questions.

NOTE: All workshops listed below are free of charge, and may include a stipend for participating. Whether a participant receives a stipend will depend on availability of budget and whether the participant's district is willing to provide aggregated data on students taking computer science courses. Participants will receive a certificate for the professional development hours attended. Course credit at University of Northern Colorado is also possible, depending on interest.

First Name
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Last Name
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Full School Name
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School District
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School Enrollment
Approximately how many students are enrolled in your school (not your class, but overall school)?
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School Background
Approximately what percentage of students at your school qualify for free or reduced lunch?
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School Location
Please use http://maps.google.com and type in the distance between your school and Colorado School of Mines.
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Email
This will be our main point of contact with you after you register, so please type carefully!
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Phone (cell best)
To be used as a secondary contact, only if needed (e.g., for important changes to workshop).
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Introduction to Snap! June 27-29th
Snap! is a visual, drag-and-drop programming language that is suitable for a serious introduction to computer science in middle and high schools. If you would like to introduce students to programming, then come learn the basics of Snap! Also, if you are doing the BJC training and are new to programming, then this workshop is recommended; that is, this workshop will help you with some of the work you need to complete prior to the in-person week of professional development.
Python: July 6-8th
Python is a high-level general purpose programming language that is easy to learn, making it suitable for an introductory programming course. This workshop will teach the fundamentals of programming as well as the advanced features on Python. Participants are encouraged to attend at least July 6-7th, with July 8th as an option for those who want to delve deeper.
Computer Science... what's the big idea? July 12-13th
When teaching computer science (CS) topics, it can be too easy to miss the wood for the trees. Why do students need to know how to "code"? Why do we teach them how to work with binary numbers? What's the purpose of learning bubblesort and quicksort? This workshop will look at a list of 10 "big ideas" of computer science that have been distilled based on input from curriculum designers and CS experts around the world, and they will be presented in a fun and engaging way. Teachers will then be able to relate the 10 "big ideas" to various topics they teach in computer science to the context of a bigger picture. We will explore the big ideas using examples of teaching activities, particularly from the "CS Unplugged" project that Tim leads. Even if you are new to computer science and want to know "what's the big idea", you will learn useful topics for the courses you teach. Bringing your own device will be very useful, but there will be options available if that's not possible.
Computational Thinking and Music Education July 14th
Computational thinking (CT) applies to subjects outside computer science, and music is no exception. CT ideas such as decomposition, patterns, abstraction and algorithms can all be exercised in a meaningful way while at the same time engaging students with key concepts from music. This workshop will present ideas for having students exercise ideas from music while at the same time developing skills relating to CT. The session will assume an interest in music, but not necessarily specialist knowledge of music theory - you'll get to explore that via computational thinking! If you have a laptop and headphones, please bring them. Bringing your own device will be very useful, but there will be options available if that's not possible.
Python: July 31st-Aug 2nd
Python is a high-level general purpose programming language that is easy to learn, making it suitable for an introductory programming course. This workshop will teach the fundamentals of programming as well as the advanced features on Python. Participants are encouraged to attend at least July 31st/Aug 1st, with Aug 2nd as an option for those who want to delve deeper.
If you plan to attend a workshop, would you want to enroll for course credit at UNC (if it was available)? You would need to pay UNC for the credit earned.
Courses You Plan to Teach in Fall 2016
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