Glen Ridge History Quiz 9
Quiz #9 is the final quiz as we slowly and thoughtfully enter Phase 2 of re-opening in the state of New Jersey. It will focus on the following Glen Ridge Historical Society newsletters and Jon Russo’s “A Smidge of Glen Ridge":

February, 2009
November, 2010
April, 2012
April, 2013
September, 2013
April, 2019

Glen Ridge Historical Society articles can be found at bit.ly/36bXJJZ

Additional Jon Russo's "A Smidge of Glen Ridge" images can be found at bit.ly/2Z1RUeP

We hope you have enjoyed the quizzes and that they have advanced your knowledge of our Borough’s history and inspired you to look further into the resources we’ve mentioned.

Hopefully, they will prompt you to visit both the Terry S. Webster Museum of the Glen Ridge Historical Society and the Local Historical Archive at the Glen Ridge Public Library.

These quizzes came about through the hard work and expertise of Sally Meyer, Glen Ridge Borough Historian, Tracey Melhuish, Glen Ridge resident and Glen Ridge Public Library volunteer, and Helen Beckert, Glen Ridge Public Library’s Reference Librarian.




Quiz will begin after this vintage 1918 Spanish influenza poster
The first newspaper covering Glen Ridge news was called The Glen Ridge Original. It was published monthly from November 1890 to October 1891. Its efforts to promote secession from Bloomfield included all of the following demands EXCEPT:
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The first post office in Glen Ridge opened in 1883 in the Ridgewood Avenue train station. In 1924, it moved across Darwin Place to the annex of the Glen Ridge Trust Company. Its current building was constructed in 1937 as part of the New Deal era on the site of the former Glen Ridge Men’s Club. Why was it built in the Colonial Revival style?
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Frank Llyod Wright first began designing his Usonian homes in 1934 at the height of the Depression. They were intended to be affordable houses for middle-class American families who increasingly lived without domestic help. Glen Ridge is lucky to have been chosen for one of only about a hundred Usonian homes designed by Wright. In fact, the home was originally commissioned by the Stuart Richardson family in 1941 for a lot in a nearby town. However, World War II delayed the project for ten years and the property was no longer available, so the Richardsons purchased the lot in Glen Ridge. In what town was the original building site?
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Long before Mr. Edison pulled that electric switch at the Ridgewood Avenue station in 1930, rail transport of raw materials and industrial goods was a primary factor in the development of northern New Jersey’s railroads in the second-half of the 19th century. During that time, Glen Ridge had a number of mills and factories on both sides of Toney’s Brook. But instead of carrying the products of these early industries, the first railroad in Glen Ridge was a passenger line. It ran along the same route through the Glen that daily commuter trains follow today. Which of the following early Ridgers arranged for the new 1856 Morris and Essex Railroad to make Glen Ridge a stop on that line?
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In 1666, 64 Connecticut families purchased land from the local Native American tribe. They named it Newark. Accurate information about Native American history in Glen Ridge and nearby towns has been difficult to document. Yet, investigation has yielded the following evidence EXCEPT:
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