Quiz: Sidney's Apology & Dryden's Essay Dramatic Poesy
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1. Match the writer with the Essay
Of Dramatick Poesie, an Essay (1668)
The Schoole of Abuse (1579)
An Apology for Poetry (1595)
Stephen Gosson
Sir Philip Sidney
John Dryden
2. Stephen Gosson published a pamphlet describing and decrying the immorality of English playhouses and English poetry. Although Gosson dedicated his tract to "the right noble / Gentleman, Master Philip Sidney," the pamphlet appears to have irritated rather than flattered its intended patron, for was around this time that Sidney almost certainly began working on to reply him.
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3. In praise of poets, who said this: "Her world is brazen, the poets only deliver a golden"?
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4. Who said: "Poetry is an art of imitation, for so Aristotle termeth it in the word mimesis--that is to say, a representing, counterfeiting, or figuring forth--to speak metaphorically, a speaking picture--with this end, to teach and delight"?
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5. What is the possible meaning of these lines from Sir Philip Sidney in his 'Apology': ""The poet, he nothing affirms, and therefore never lieth.  For, as I take it, to lie is to affirm that to be true which is false.  So as the other artists, and especially the historian, affirming many things, can, in the cloudy knowledge of mankind, hardly escape from many lies.  But the poet (as I said before) never affirmeth. [ . . .  so wise readers of poetry] will never give the lie to things not affirmatively but allegorically and figuratively written"?
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6. _______________ is the most important contribution to Renaissance literary theory. Sidney advocates a place for poetry within the framework of an aristocratic state, while showing concern for both literary and national identity.
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7. Match these imaginary personae's with their possible real figures
Charles Sackville
Sir Robert Howard
Sir Charles Sedley
John Dryden
Eugenius
Crites
Lisideius
Neander
8. Match these imaginary personae's with the idea they stood for in the Essay of Dramatic Poesy
favors the moderns over the ancients, arguing that the moderns exceed the ancients because of having learned and profited from their example
argues in favor of the ancients: they established the unities; dramatic rules were spelled out by Aristotle which the current--and esteemed--French playwrights follow; and Ben Jonson--the greatest English playwright, according to Crites--followed the ancients' example by adhering to the unities.
argues that French drama is superior to English drama, basing this opinion of the French writer's close adherence to the classical separation of comedy and tragedy. For Lisideius "no theater in the world has anything so absurd as the English tragicomedy . . . in two hours and a half, we run through all the fits of Bedlam."
favors the modern-English plays, but does not disparage the ancients. He also favors English drama--and has some critical things to say of French drama: "those beauties of the French poesy are such as will raise perfection higher where it is, but are not sufficient to give it where it is not: they are indeed the beauties of a statue, but not of a man."
Eugenius
Crites
Lisideius
Neander
9. Which of the following ideas are NOT discussed in the Essay of Dramatic Poesy by John Dryden
You can select one or more options
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10. In his address, ‘To the Readers’, prefixed to ‘the Essay’, Dryden says that his aim was . . .
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11. Which of the following definition of 'Play' is true (as per Dryden's Essay of Dramatic Poesy)?
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12. Which of the following arguments are given in defense of violation of three unities by English playwrights?
Check all correct answers. There may be more than one correct answer/s
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13. Which of the following arguments are given in defense of mingling of mirth with serious plots by English playwrights?
Check all correct answers
1 point
14. What is to be learnt from the ancient versus modern controversy?
1 point
15. Match the dramatists with the Dryden's description of them
Their Playes are now the most pleasant and frequent entertainments of the Stage; two of theirs being acted through the year for one of Shakespeare's or Johnson’s: the reason is, because there is a certain gayety in their Comedies, and Pathos in their more serious Playes, which suits generally with all men’s humours. 
especially being so accurate a judge of Playes, that Ben Johnson while he liv'd, submitted all his Writings to his Censure, and 'tis thought, us'd his judgement in correcting, if not contriving all his Plots.
he was the man who of all Moderns, and perhaps Ancient Poets, had the largest and most comprehensive soul. All the Images of Nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily: when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too. 
Humour was his proper Sphere, and in that he delighted most to represent Mechanick people.
Beaumont and Fletcher 
Francis Beaumont 
Ben Jonson
William Shakespeare
17. Which of the following is NOT true?
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18. Match the lines with the dramatist - with reference to Dryden's Dramatic Poesy
. But he is alwayes great, when some great occasion is presented to him : no man can say he ever had a fit subject for his wit, and did not then raise himself as high above the rest of the Poets.
But he has done his Robberies so openly, that one may see he fears not to be taxed by any Law. He invades Authours like a Monarch, and what would be theft in other Poets, is only victory in him.
Ben Jonson
William Shakespeare
18a. Match the lines with the dramatist - with reference to Dryden's Dramatic Poesy
Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation: he was naturally learn'd; he needed not the spectacles of Books to read Nature; he look'd inwards, and found her there.
. One cannot say he wanted wit, but rather that he was frugal of it. In his works you find little to retrench or alter. Wit and Language, and Humour also in some measure we had before him ; but something of Art was wanting to the Drama till he came.
Ben Jonson
William Shakespeare
19. Which of the following arguments are given by Crites against the use of rhyme in plays?
Check all correct arguments
1 point
20. Which of the following arguments are given by Neander in favour of use of rhyme in plays?
1 point
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