Computer usage on society

Research study examining how computers are used in our society.

Pedro I. López
http://www.dreilopz.me

Published under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/). Content heavily based on the survey used for the paper "Toth, D., Mayer, R., Nichols, W (2011). Increasing Participation in Volunteer Computing. Parallel and Distributed Processing Workshops and Phd Forum (IPDPSW), 2011 IEEE International Symposium on, ISBN 9781612844251, ISSN 1530-2075."


INFORMED CONSENT
CONSENT TO PARTICIPATE IN RESEARCH PROJECT ENTITLED: Computer Usage in Society

You are invited to take part in a research study examining how computers are used in our society. By conducting this study, we hope to gain a better understanding how people might use their computers in new or different kinds of ways in the future.

Procedures: If you choose to participate in the study, you will be asked to complete a questionnaire. Although our focus here is on computer usage, you do not have to actually use your own personal computer to participate. No particular specialized knowledge of computers is required to participate, and in fact, we are interested in the attitudes of people with a range of experiences in using computers. The study is done completely on-line and should take you about 10 minutes to complete.

Benefits: This study may be of no direct benefit to you, but it is crucial for increasing our knowledge about how computers function in society. Completing the survey and reflecting on your attitudes towards computers and society may increase you knowledge and expose you to some new ideas about technology.

Potential Risks: There are no inherent physical or psychological risks in the procedures themselves beyond those encountered in the normal course of everyday life. If you experience any distress or discomfort in the course of participating in this research you are free to discontinue completing the survey at any time without penalty.

Confidentiality: The information from the surveys will be used for research purposes only. Your responses are anonymous. You will not identify yourself in the survey. In the event of publication of this research, no personally identifying information will be disclosed.

Freedom of Choice to Participate: You are (1) free to decide whether or not to participate, (2) free to withdraw from the study at any time without penalty, and also (3) free to decline to answer any specific questions in this survey without penalty.

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    How likely would you be to participate in the project?
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    Welcome to Docking@Home

    Docking@Home is a project which uses Internet-connected computers to perform scientific calculations that aid in the creation of new and improved medicines. The project aims to help cure diseases such as HIV, cancer, and Alzheimer's. Docking@Home is a collaboration between the University of Delaware, The Scripps Research Institute, and the University of California -Berkeley. It is part of the Dynamically Adaptive Protein-Ligand Docking System project and is supported by the National Science Foundation. How Does It Work? Before new drugs can be produced for laboratory testing, researchers must create molecular models and simulate their interactions to reveal possible candidates for effective drugs. This simulation is called docking. The combinations of molecules and their binding orientations are infinite in number. Simulating as many combinations as possible requires a tremendous amount of computing power. In order to reduce costs, researchers have decided that an effective means of generating this computing power is to distribute the tasks across a large number of computers. How Can I Help? By downloading a free program developed at University of California -Berkeley called BOINC, you can contribute your computer's idle processing cycles to the Docking@Home project. It's safe, easy to setup, and runs only when you want it to so it won't affect your ability to use your computer. Sounds Good, But I Need More Info Docking@Home has been in operation since September 2004 and its network now includes 19,486 participants from around the world.If you are interested in finding out more information, you can read more about the project and the science behind it at our website (docking@home.web) or you can contact us at docking@home.org.
    Contributing to solving an important societal problem
    Working with others to accomplish something important
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    How interesting did you find the description of Docking@Home?
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    In thinking about problems you see in your community, how much difference do you believe you can make personally in solving these problems?
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    In thinking about problems you see in your community, how much difference do you believe that people working together can make in solving these problems?
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    In thinking about problems you see in your community, how much difference do you believe that the government can make in solving these problems?
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