Baltimore City Census 2020 Community Grant Application
The importance of a complete and accurate Census cannot be overstated. Mandated by the U.S. Constitution, the Census count impacts our most fundamental rights and ability to adequately plan for our collective future.

The Census determines how we will be represented in Congress, in the Maryland General Assembly, and in City Council. It directly affects the allocation of over $880 billion per year in federal assistance for neighborhood improvements, public health, education, social services, transportation, and much more. For Baltimore City, it is estimated that $1800 in federal funding per resident, per year is allocated based on Census data.

Census data serve as the basis for how we characterize and understand our community and its needs. Community leaders in both the public and private sectors rely heavily on the accuracy of Census data to make important decisions affecting the future of Baltimore City. Indeed, the importance of Census data pervades nearly all forms of decision-making. Government leaders rely on it for a host of local decisions, businesses rely on it in evaluating markets and choosing where to locate development, residents rely on local data in choosing where to live, and foundations and other philanthropic organizations rely on it as a primary basis for the funding decisions that enable many important community improvement efforts to succeed.
Target Geographies and Populations
To ensure the most complete and accurate count, the Baltimore City Complete Count Committee will be accepting applications for mini-grants to fund organizations who work and operate with populations and geographies in traditionally under-counted areas of the City.

The traditionally under-counted populations are not in a single geography and are spread throughout the city. There will be an increased effort in the low income and high vacancy areas. That said, out of the 278 neighborhoods in Baltimore, we have identified 69 which hold the highest concentration of our traditionally under-counted populations:

Baltimore Highlands
Barclay
Better Waverly
Boyd-Booth
Broadway East
Brooklyn
Callaway-Garrison
Carrollton Ridge
Central Forest Park
Central Park Heights
Charles North
Charles Village
Cherry Hill
Curtis Bay
Dickeyville
Dolfield
Dorchester
Druid Heights
East Baltimore Midway
Easterwood
Ellwood Park/Monument
Fairfield Area
Fairmont
Fallstaff
Forest Park
Four By Four
Franklin Square
Franklintown
Garwyn Oaks
Greenmount West
Greenspring
Harlem Park
Highlandtown
Hollins Market
Irvington
Johns Hopkins Homewood
Kresson
Lakeland
Lucille Park
Madison-Eastend
McElderry Park
Midtown-Edmondson
Millhill
Milton-Montford
New Southwest/Mount Clare
Mount Holly
Mount Winans
Northwest Community Action
O'Donnell Heights
Old Goucher
Oldtown
Orangeville
Parklane
Parkview/Woodbrook
Penn North
Perkins Homes
Poppleton
Pulaski Industrial Area
Purnell
Remington
Reservoir Hill
Seton Hill
Towanda-Grantley
Union Square
University Of Maryland
Upton
Wakefield
Washington Hill
Westport
Woodberry
Target Geographies and Populations
Target Geographies and Populations
The Complete Count Committee has identified the following populations at risk of an under-count:

• Black males between the ages of 18 to 29
• Young children under the age of 5 (i.e. young children in low-income households, living in complex households with grandparents or in foster placement, homeless families)
• People with disabilities and special needs (ie. blind, hard of hearing and deaf)
• Returning citizens
• People experiencing homelessness (shelters, couch-surfing, hotels, streets)
• LGBTQ Youth
• Older Adults
• Immigrants and non-English speakers
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