Neuromyths and Evidence-Based Practices in Higher Education Questions
From: Betts, K., Miller, M., Tokuhama-Espinosa, T., Shewokis, P., Anderson, A., Borja, C., Galoyan, T., Delaney, B., Eigenauer, J., & Dekker, S. (2019). International report: Neuromyths and evidence-based practices in higher education. Online Learning Consortium: Newburyport, MA.

Page 39: "Finally, educators are invited to replicate this study and encouraged to construct and test new interventions that will lead to quality tertiary education."

Directions: Test yourself - Answer each question to the best of your ability to discover whether or not you have been misled by neuromyths. Feedback and resources will be provided so you can learn more.
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Neuromyths and General Statements about the Brain
1. We use our brain 24 hours a day. *
1 point
2. It is best for children to learn their native language before a second language is learned. *
1 point
3. On average, males have bigger brains than females. *
1 point
4. When a brain region is damaged, other parts of the brain can sometimes take up its function. *
1 point
5. We only use 10% of our brain. *
1 point
6. The left and right hemispheres of the brain work together. *
1 point
7. Some of us are “left-brained” and some are “right-brained” due to hemispheric dominance and this helps explain differences in how we learn. *
1 point
8. The brains of males and females develop at different rates. *
1 point
9. Brain development has finished by the time children reach puberty. *
1 point
10. There are critical periods in human development after which certain skills can no longer be learned. *
1 point
11. Information is stored in networks of cells distributed throughout the brain. *
1 point
12. Learning is due to the addition of new cells to the brain. *
1 point
13. Individuals learn better when they receive information in their preferred learning styles (e.g., auditory, visual, kinesthetic). *
1 point
14. Learning occurs through changes to the connections between brain cells. *
1 point
15. A primary indicator of dyslexia is seeing letters backwards. *
1 point
16. Normal development of the human brain involves the birth and death of brain cells. *
1 point
17. Mental capacity is genetic and cannot be changed by experiences. *
1 point
18. Extended rehearsal of some mental processes can change the shape and structure of some parts of the brain. *
1 point
19. Individual learners show preferences for the mode in which they receive information (e.g., visual, auditory, kinesthetic). *
1 point
20. Learning problems associated with developmental differences in brain function cannot be improved by education. *
1 point
21. Learning is due to modifications in the brain. *
1 point
22. Listening to classical music increases reasoning ability. *
1 point
23. Production of new connections in the brain can continue into old age. *
1 point
General Statements from the Learning Sciences and MBE (Mind, Brain, Education) Science
24. Metacognition plays a role in learning. *
1 point
25. Learning should be spaced out over time. *
1 point
26. Focused attention is essential for learning new information. *
1 point
27. Maintaining a positive atmosphere in the classroom helps promote learning. *
1 point
28. Repeated practice and rehearsal of learned material or a skill will help to consolidate it in long-term memory. *
1 point
29. Experts and novices approach solving problems in essentially the same way. *
1 point
30. Differentiated instruction is individualized instruction. *
1 point
31. Rereading course materials is an effective strategy for learning. *
1 point
32. Explaining the purpose of a learning activity helps engage students in that activity. *
1 point
33. Decorative graphics can enhance learning when applied to course materials. *
1 point
34. Meaningful feedback accelerates learning. *
1 point
35. Information that is studied over longer periods of time is better remembered than the same information studied over shorter periods of time. *
1 point
36. The mind connects new information to prior knowledge. *
1 point
37. Universal Design for Learning is a framework to improve and optimize teaching and learning for all people based on scientific insights into how humans learn. *
1 point
38. With respect to memory, massed instruction is superior to spaced instruction. *
1 point
39. Frequent, low stakes tests do not enhance learning. *
1 point
40. Sleep has a role in memory consolidation. *
1 point
41. Emotions can affect human cognitive processes, including attention, learning and memory, reasoning, and problem-solving. *
1 point
42. Human brains are relatively as unique as fingerprints. *
1 point
43. You can train certain parts of the brain to improve their functioning. *
1 point
44. Stress can impair the ability of the brain to encode and recall memories. *
1 point
45. Intelligence is fixed at birth. *
1 point
46. Production of new neuronal connections in the brain continues over the lifetime. *
1 point
47. The brain acts as a filter to help us to pay attention to what is important. *
1 point
48. Multitasking while studying increases productivity. *
1 point
49. Human memory works much like a digital recording device or video camera in that it accurately records the events we have experienced. *
1 point
50. Human brains seek and often quickly detect novelty. *
1 point
51. Testing, in general, tends to detract from learning. *
1 point
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