Open Letter to Minister Morneau Regarding Proposed Federal Tax Changes for CCPCs from Canadian Physicians /// Une lettre ouverte de médecins canadiens au ministre Morneau au sujet des réformes fiscales proposées visant les SPCC
*******************Veuillez trouver la version française ci-dessous.**************************

Please sign if you are a physician or medical student in Canada, and agree with the open letter below. Please sign your name as you would like it to appear publicly. Your email address will not be shared; we may contact you in the future with updates on issues related to tax fairness. If you have any questions please contact us at docsfortaxequity@gmail.com. Check out the full list of signatories at https://docsandtaxes.wordpress.com/

****** Signatures will NOT appear immediately on the website. We will update the list on an ongoing basis ******

*******************************************************************************************

An Open Letter To Minister Morneau Regarding Proposed Federal Tax Changes for CCPCs From Canadian Physicians

To: Hon. William Francis Morneau, Minister of Finance
CC: Board of the Canadian Medical Association
Boards of Provincial/Territorial Medical Associations across Canada

Dear Minister Morneau,

We are a group of physicians from across Canada contributing a shared perspective on the proposed changes to the Canadian-controlled private corporation (CCPC) tax regulations. We work in various specialties and practice models, both incorporated and not. While we have had some concerns with the government’s approach and language used in the rollout, we do fundamentally support an equitable taxation system as a pillar for a just and healthy society.

The median income of an individual in Canada was $33,920 in 2015, a fraction of the income of most full-time physicians. Rising income inequality has negative population health consequences for rich and poor alike. We need adequate tax revenues to fund social programs such as affordable housing, pharmacare, social assistance, legal aid, and the healthcare system itself. These programs directly impact the health of our patients, and we believe it is important for us to contribute to their sustainability through an adequate tax base.

Physicians are in a unique situation of being publicly funded, but mostly self-employed, often running practices with varying amounts of overhead. We generally do not receive benefits, such as extended health, parental leave, or pensions. We have long training periods, incur significant student debt, enter the workforce late, and have high rates of burnout. Still, even with these constraints, the vast majority of physicians remain among the top 1-5% of income earners in Canada.

Through various provincial negotiations, physicians have been given the opportunity to incorporate. In some cases this was done in lieu of fee increases despite federal jurisdiction over relevant tax policy. Sixty percent of physicians across the country are incorporated, and as such, are able to access legal mechanisms to reduce their tax rate via income sprinkling, earning passive investment income, and converting income to capital gains.

Some physicians have argued that these tax mechanisms are provided in lieu of benefits or to compensate for high student debt and long training periods. We suspect that these concerns, as well as increasing rates of burnout and inequities between physician payment models, are also contributing to the majority response - one of opposition to the changes - thus far. However, we feel that these issues are best addressed at their root with the best available policy solutions and not in inherently unstable ways through a tax system that is constantly evolving. Such solutions will require adequate funds especially from those most able to pay to provide all Canadians with high quality public services, including healthcare.

We thus believe that these solutions do not lie in maintaining existing tax benefits for the medical profession. Following careful consultation and review of recent literature on the subject, it appears that these benefits are advantageous mostly to certain incorporated doctors with specific family structures and those who earn enough to supercede traditional savings vehicles available to all Canadians (RRSPs, TFSAs, RESPs, CPP). This seems unfair to single-parent physicians, those with young children or those who cannot incorporate at all. It also seems unfair that these benefits are not available to Canadians with similar incomes who cannot incorporate. As such, we support the proposed changes regarding income sprinkling, tax rates on passive investment income, and capital gains through corporations. However, these changes should not be made without a transition plan, nor in isolation, but rather as part of a comprehensive review of tax policy with a view to equity.

As such, we call on the federal government to:

Implement proposed reforms to Canadian controlled private corporations as a first step in a comprehensive reassessment of tax policy in Canada, especially mechanisms that disproportionately benefit large corporations and the wealthiest Canadians.

Outline a clear transition plan for savings held in medical professional corporations. Physicians who have used these methods under existing agreements to prepare for retirement should not be unfairly penalised. For those who have foregone contributions to TFSAs, RRSPs, RESPs and CPP, we suggest a one-time retroactive contribution period.

Work with provinces and territories to review options for access to extended health benefits, parental leave, and pension plans for all Canadians, as well as payment reform options that would be available to all physicians that address these important aspects.

Work with provinces and territories to tackle the issue of increasing medical student debt by lowering tuition for incoming students and implementing forgiveness programs for existing debt.

Thank you for your time, and we look forward to your reply.

Sincerely,

Lesley Barron, MD, FRCSC, Limehouse, ON
Ahmed Bayoumi, MD FRCPC, Toronto ON
Michaela Beder, MD, FRCPC, Toronto, ON
Michael Benusic, MD, CCFP, Camrose, AB
Philip B. Berger, MD, Toronto, ON
Gary Bloch, MD, CCFP, FCFP, Toronto, ON
Melissa Bota, MD, Vancouver, BC
Vanessa Brcic, MD, CCFP, Vancouver, BC
Monika Dutt, MD, CCFP, FRCPC, Sydney, NS
Duncan Etches, BSc, MD, MClSc, CCFP, FCFP, Vancouver, BC
Sarah Giles, MD, CCFP(EM), DTM&H, Orleans, ON
Ritika Goel, MD, MPH, CCFP, Toronto, ON
Samantha Green, MD, CCFP, Toronto, ON
Ryan Herriot, MD, CCFP, Victoria, BC
Lisa M. Howard MD, CCFP, Vancouver BC
Gabrielle Inglis, MD, CCFP, ON
Benjamin Langer, MD, CCFP, Toronto, ON
Azad Mashari, MD, FRCPC, Toronto, ON
Rita McCracken, MD, CCFP, Vancouver, BC
Ashley Miller, MD, FRCPC, Halifax, NS
Baijayanta Mukhopadhyay, MD, CCFP, Montréal, QC
Sarah Partridge, MD, CCFP, Ottawa, ON
Rupa Patel, MD, CCFP, Kingston, Ontario
Nitasha Puri, MD, CCFP, dip ABAM, Vancouver, BC
Pal Randhawa, MD, CCFP, St John’s, NL
Michael Rachlis, MD, Toronto, ON
Danyaal Raza, MD, CCFP, Toronto, ON
Nadia Salvaterra, MD, CCFP, Inuvik, NT
Hasan Sheikh, MD, CCFP(EM), Toronto, ON
Mei-ling Wiedmeyer, MD, CCFP, Vancouver, BC
Edward Xie, MD, CCFP(EM), Toronto, ON

Further signatories on https://docsandtaxes.wordpress.com/

************************************************************************************************

Veuillez nous contacter via docsfortaxequity@gmail.com avec toutes vos questions.

************************************************************************************************

Une lettre ouverte de médecins canadiens au ministre Morneau au sujet des réformes fiscales proposées visant les SPCC

À: L'honorable William Francis Morneau, Ministre des Finances
C. c.: Membres du Conseil d'administration de l'Association Médicale Canadienne
Membres des conseils d'administration des fédérations des médecins des provinces et des territoires

Nous sommes un groupe de médecins canadiens qui partagent un point de vue sur les modifications proposées aux sociétés privées sous contrôle canadien (SPCC). Nous travaillons dans différentes spécialités et dans diverses contextes de pratique, certains incorporés et d'autres non. Quoique nous regrettons sincèrement l'approche et le ton gouvernemental lors du déploiement de ses propositions, nous demeurons fermement en faveur d'un régime fiscal équitable comme pilier d'une société juste et saine.

Le revenu médian d'une personne au Canada était 33 920 $ en 2015, un salaire nettement inférieur au revenu de la plupart des médecins. L'inégalité croissante des revenus a des conséquences néfastes sur la santé de tous, riches et pauvres. Nous dépendons des recettes fiscales pour financer les programmes sociaux tels que le logement abordable, les assurances médicaments, l'aide sociale, l'aide juridique ainsi que le système de santé. Ces programmes ont un impact direct sur la santé de nos patients. Or, nous croyons qu'il est important de contribuer à leur pérennité en assurant une base fiscale adéquate.

Les médecins se retrouvent dans une situation particulière en étant des travailleurs autonomes financés par des fonds publiques. Par ailleurs, les frais administratifs de nos cabinets varient énormément. En général, nous n'avons pas accès aux avantages sociaux tels qu'un congé parental, un régime de retraite ou des avantages médicaux. Nos études durent de nombreuses années où nous accumulons une lourde dette d'études, nous entrons sur le marché du travail en retard et nous y subissons un taux élevé d'épuisement professionnel. Pourtant, malgré ces défis, la majorité des médecins se retrouvent parmi les 1 à 5% les mieux rémunérés.

Au cours des diverses négociations provinciales, les médecins ont obtenu le droit de s'incorporer malgré la compétence fédérale dans ce domaine, dans certains cas au lieu d'une augmentation des tarifs. Les 60% des médecins du pays qui se sont incorporés accédèrent ainsi à différentes stratégies fiscales légales pour diminuer leur taux d'imposition: le fractionnement du revenu, les revenus d'un portefeuille passif à l'intérieur d'une société et la conversion du revenu en gain en capital.

Certains médecins prétendent que ces stratégies fiscales remplacent les avantages sociaux ou alors compensent pour la dette étudiante élevée et les longues études. Ces préoccupations, ainsi que les inégalités entres le modèles de rémunérations des médecins et l'épuisement professionel, sont au coeur de la position majoritaire d'opposition aux changements proposés. Cependant, nous estimons qu'il serait préférable de s'attaquer à chacun de ces enjeux directement et non pas par un régime fiscal qui se doit d'évoluer. De telles solutions publiques nécessiteront un financement adéquat de la part de ceux qui peuvent contribuer le plus afin d'octroyer des services publiques de qualité, y compris les soins de santé.

Nous croyons que les solutions de politique publique ne reposent pas sur des avantages fiscaux des médecins. Après une consultation approfondie des publications récentes, il semble que les bénéfices de ces avantages fiscaux se concentrent chez certains médecins incorporés avec une structure familiale particulière qui peuvent investir un montant au delà des limites des méthodes d'épargne habituels (REER, CELI, REEE, RPC). Cela nous semble injuste pour les médecins monoparentaux, ceux qui ont des jeunes enfants ou ceux qui ne peuvent pas s'incorporer. Il nous semble tout aussi injuste que les autres canadiens à revenus semblables ne peuvent pas s'incorporer. Nous appuyons donc les modifications proposées au fractionnement du revenu, au portefeuille passif et au gain en capital en société. Toutefois, nous demandons un plan clair de transition et un examen complet du régime fiscal visant l'équité.

Nous demandons donc au gouvernement fédéral:

1. Que la mise en oeuvre des réformes proposées aux sociétés privées sous contrôle canadien soit la première étape d'une réévaluation globale de la politique fiscale au Canada pour adresser les mécanismes qui avantagent les grandes entreprises et les canadiens les plus aisés.

2. Qu'il y ait un plan clair de transition entre le régime actuel d'épargnes via les sociétés professionnelles et les methods traditionnelles. Pour ceux et celles qui n'ont pas contribué aux CELI, REER, REE ou RPC, nous proposons une période de cotisation rétroactive sans pénalités.

3. De revoir avec les gouvernements des provinces et des territoires l'accès aux avantages sociaux, aux congés parentaux et aux régimes de retraite pour tous les canadiens ainsi que de revoir les modes de rémunération des médecin pour leur permettre d'y accéder.

4. De travailler avec les provinces et les territoires pour réduire l'endettement des étudiants en médecine par la réduction des frais de scolarité croissants et la remise de dette.

Nous vous prions d'agréer, Monsieur le ministre, l'expression de notre considération respectueuse.

1. Lesley Barron, MD, FRCSC, Limehouse, ON
2. Ahmed Bayoumi, MD FRCPC, Toronto ON
3. Michaela Beder, MD, FRCPC, Toronto, ON
4. Michael Benusic, MD, CCFP, Camrose, AB
5. Philip B. Berger, MD, Toronto, ON
6. Gary Bloch, MD, CCFP, FCFP, Toronto, ON
7. Melissa Bota, MD, Vancouver, BC
8. Vanessa Brcic, MD, CCFP, Vancouver, BC
9. Monika Dutt, MD, CCFP, FRCPC, Sydney, NS
10. Duncan Etches, BSc, MD, MClSc, CCFP, FCFP, Vancouver, BC
11. Sarah Giles, MD, CCFP(EM), DTM&H, Orleans, ON
12. Ritika Goel, MD, MPH, CCFP, Toronto, ON
13. Samantha Green, MD, CCFP, Toronto, ON
14. Ryan Herriot, MD, CCFP, Victoria, BC
15. Lisa M. Howard MD, CCFP, Vancouver BC
16. Gabrielle Inglis, MD, CCFP, ON
17. Benjamin Langer, MD, CCFP, Toronto, ON
18. Azad Mashari, MD, FRCPC, Toronto, ON
19. Rita McCracken, MD, CCFP, Vancouver, BC
20. Ashley Miller, MD, FRCPC, Halifax, NS
21. Baijayanta Mukhopadhyay, MD, CCFP, Montréal, QC
22. Sarah Partridge, MD, CCFP, Ottawa, ON
23. Rupa Patel, MD, CCFP, Kingston, Ontario
24. Nitasha Puri, MD, CCFP, dip ABAM, Vancouver, BC
25. Pal Randhawa, MD, CCFP, St John’s, NL
26. Michael Rachlis, MD, Toronto, ON
27. Danyaal Raza, MD, CCFP, Toronto, ON
28. Nadia Salvaterra, MD, CCFP, Inuvik, NT
29. Hasan Sheikh, MD, CCFP(EM), Toronto, ON
30. Mei-ling Wiedmeyer, MD, CCFP, Vancouver, BC
31. Edward Xie, MD, CCFP(EM), Toronto, ON

Des nouveaux signataires seront ajoutés à https://docsandtaxes.wordpress.com/

************************************************************************************************
References:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tableaux/sum-som/l01/cst01/famil105a-eng.htm
https://secure.cihi.ca/free_products/Summary_Report_2015_EN.pdf
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25577953
https://www.cma.ca/Assets/assets-library/document/en/advocacy/submissions/cma-brief-medical-practice-as-small-business-march-17-2016.pdf
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264273467-en pages 79-80

************************************************************************************************

Email address *
Full name *
Your answer
Professional Designation (e.g. MD, FRCPC, etc) *
Your answer
Specialty (eg. Family Medicine, General Surgery, Medical Student etc) *
Your answer
City *
Your answer
Province/Territory *
Your answer
I confirm that I am a physician, resident, or medical student licensed or registered in Canada (required) *
Required
Submit
Never submit passwords through Google Forms.
This content is neither created nor endorsed by Google. Report Abuse - Terms of Service