The Sixth Amendment
The Sixth Amendment explains the rights of the accused in a criminal trial. It outlines the requirement that a trial be both speedy and public. It also demands that the accused has access to an attorney and witnesses. Like all amendments in the Bill of Rights, the Sixth Amendment acts as a layer of protection against the government.

The text of this amendment reads, “In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the Assistance of Counsel for his defence.”
What year was the Sixth Amendment ratified?
10 points
What right is protected under the Sixth Amendment?
10 points
Does the Sixth Amendment apply to civil or criminal cases?
10 points
How quickly must a prosecutor begin the trial of the accused?
10 points
What is a “subpoena”?
10 points
What happens in a plea bargain?
10 points
What was the Supreme Court’s ruling in Gideon v. Wainwright (1963)?
10 points
What is “voir dire”?
10 points
What did the Founders believe was essential to maintaining fairness in justice?
10 points
What does "sequestering" mean?
10 points
Submit
This content is neither created nor endorsed by Google. Report Abuse - Terms of Service