May 19 Meeting: Speaker Question Submission Form
Dear IE Members:

Please submit audience member questions for the guest speakers at our May 19, 2020 meeting by noon on May 19. This meeting will be held virtually on Zoom. To register and sign up, see below. We have increased the maximum number of guests to attend so that we can accommodate all. The meeting will be recorded to watch later so no worries if you are not available at that time. Thank you!

“Navigating Information in the Era of Digital News and Social Media”

Our expert panel of Northwestern University faculty will help you learn how to "Separate News You Can Use from News You Can Lose!" See Bios below the Meeting Instructions!

**Meeting Registration, Confirmation & Question Submission **

Registration: Register for the meeting, with the link below. This link will not get you into the meeting, you must receive the confirmation email with the zoom link.
Registration Link: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZ0sf--qqD0qE915FswRsIDkGFdYoOlCPMya

Confirmation: once you register, you’ll get an email confirmation from zoom with the link to the meeting. We strongly recommend you put that email and link somewhere ready to hand, so you can easily find it at the time of the meeting.

Questions: if you have questions for the speakers, we urge you submit them below. Please note if the question is for a specific panelist/topic. You may also ask questions at the meeting using the zoom chat feature. We will prioritize questions that are submitted in advance, but due to time constraints, we may not get to all the questions in the chat.

Northwestern University Faculty Speaker/Panelist Bios

***Stephanie Edgerly is an Associate Professor at Northwestern University’s Institute for Policy Research with a specialization in audience insight. Her research explores how features of new media alter the way audiences consume news and impact political engagement. She is particularly interested in the mixing of news and entertainment content, how individuals and groups create and share news over social networking websites, and how audiences selectively consume media.
Bio: https://www.medill.northwestern.edu/directory/faculty/stephanie-edgerly.html
Twitter: https://twitter.com/StephEdgerly

***Steven Franconeri is a Professor of Psychology at Northwestern University. He studies visual thinking and communication: how it works, and how we can make it work better. At his Visual Thinking Laboratory, a team of researchers explore how leveraging the visual system - the largest single system in your brain - can help people think, remember, and communicate more efficiently. His basic research is inspired by real-world problems, guiding our laboratory toward the most interesting theoretical questions, while producing results that translate directly to science, education, design, and industry.
Bio: https://www.psychology.northwestern.edu/people/faculty/core/profiles/steven-franconeri.html
Twitter: https://twitter.com/stevefranconeri

***Rachel Davis Mersey is an Associate Dean of Research and Professor. She joined the Medill faculty in 2008 with a specialization in audience understanding. The focus of her work is on the craft of journalism. She is intrigued, in particular, by journalism’s impact on identity, sense of community, and social capital. She believes that these relationships deserve to be understood in a manner that can enhance professional decision-making when it comes to new product development and ongoing news management. Her aim is to improve the practice of journalism in a manner that enhances news operations’ connections with individuals.
Bio: https://www.medill.northwestern.edu/directory/faculty/rachel-davis-mersey.html
Twitter: https://twitter.com/rdmersey

***David Rapp, Professor of Psychology and Learning Sciences at Northwestern University studying the effects of exposure to inaccurate information on memory and comprehension. Reading comprehension involves a dynamic, interactive set of processes including 1) the activation of prior knowledge, 2) the use of that activated information along with the current text, and 3) the potential updating or revision of memory. His program of research examines how these higher-order activities function both successfully and unsuccessfully during reading. He also focuses on the mechanisms that underlie our general, everyday reading experiences - for instance, how our preferences for events and characters directly influence our reading processes.
Bio: https://www.psychology.northwestern.edu/people/faculty/core/profiles/david-rapp.html
Twitter: https://twitter.com/profrapp

***Michael Spikes, Ph.D, Candidate Learning Sciences, Northwestern University has been teaching, writing about, and developing curriculum on the subject of news media literacy and its production for more than 15 years. Before coming to Northwestern, he was a program manager for the Center for News Literacy at Stony Brook University and has taught skills in news literacy skills to audiences as varied as senior citizens in Illinois and New York to teachers and high school aged youth in Bhutan and Hong Kong.
Michael is currently working with David Rapp in the reading comprehension lab to explore assessment tools of news media and information literacy for both young people and adults.
Bio: https://www.sesp.northwestern.edu/profile/?p=23497&/MichaelSpikes/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/iammikespikes

Please email us at indivisibleevanston@gmail.com if you have any additional questions. If you need help with Zoom, please contact Rosie Rees at rosie@mrosierees.org or Leslye Lapping at: leslyelapping@gmail.com.

Thank you,

IE Leadership Team
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