TAPT Registration Spring 2019
Turn-A-Page-Together (TAPT)
Each semester, MSP provides students, faculty and staff the opportunity to come together and discuss books on topics related to culture, ethnicity, and Deaf culture. The books are FREE for registered participants and so is the food! Groups meet on Wednesdays from 12:00 to 1:00 PM in the JSAC Multipurpose Room (MPR).

The deadline date is to register TAPT is Friday, February 1st, 2019.

The TAPT program beginings on February 13th, 2019.

If any questions or concerns, email elvia.guillermo@gallaudet.edu or see us at HMB S141-C.

Books are offered this Spring 2019 semester:


1. Finding Zoe: A Deaf Woman’s Story of Identity, Love, and Adoption by Brandi Rarus

At just a few months old, Zoe was gradually losing her hearing. Her adoptive parents loved her—yet agonized—feeling they couldn’t handle raising a Deaf child. Would Zoe go back into the welfare system and spend her childhood hoping to find parents willing to adopt her? Or, would she be the long-sought answer to a mother’s prayers?

Brandi Rarus was mainstreamed in school and socialized primarily in the hearing community. She felt caught between two worlds—the Deaf and the hearing. In college, Brandi embraced Deaf Culture along with the joys of complete and effortless communication with her peers. Brandi met Tim, a leader of the Gallaudet Uprising in support of selecting the university’s first Deaf president. Brandi was incredibly grateful to have her three wonderful sons, but couldn’t shake the feeling something was missing. She didn’t know that Zoe, a six-month-old Deaf baby girl caught in the foster care system, was desperately in need of a family unafraid of her different needs. Brandi found the answer to her prayers when fate brought her new adopted daughter into her life.


2. Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi

Ghana, eighteenth century: two half sisters are born into different villages, each unaware of the other. One will marry an Englishman and lead a life of comfort in the palatial rooms of the Cape Coast Castle. The other will be captured in a raid on her village, imprisoned in the very same castle, and sold into slavery.

Homegoing follows the parallel paths of these sisters and their descendants through eight generations: from the Gold Coast to the plantations of Mississippi, from the American Civil War to Jazz Age Harlem. Yaa Gyasi’s extraordinary novel illuminates slavery’s troubled legacy both for those who were taken and those who stayed—and shows how the memory of captivity has been inscribed on the soul of our nation.


3. The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures by Anne Fadiman

The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down explores the clash between a small county hospital in California and a refugee family from Laos over the care of Lia Lee, a Hmong child diagnosed with severe epilepsy. Lia's parents and her doctors both wanted what was best for Lia, but the lack of understanding between them led to tragedy. Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Current Interest, and the Salon Book Award, Anne Fadiman's compassionate account of this cultural impasse is literary journalism at its finest. The current edition, published for the book's fifteenth anniversary, includes a new afterword by the author that provides updates on the major characters along with reflections on how they have changed Fadiman's life and attitudes.

( All Reviews by Amazon)

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