DSSGx new chapter application form
Email *
Name of the proposed DSSGx Chapter: *
(e.g. “DSSGxBerlin”; the name you choose should ideally reflect the unique location, such as a city, neighborhood of the community you belong to and/or want to support. If your team is primarily working from or affiliated to a university your chapter can be named after the university.)
Details regarding your organisation (if applicable) : *
(e.g. University of XYZ, or Amazon; in case there is nothing to add here, just write none)
Full Name of Chapter Lead: *
(note, chapter lead is responsible for ensuring DSSGx guidelines on events and projects are followed):
Names of other Chapter members: *
(people who are interested in creating a chapter and have agreed to jointly make the application for the DSSGx chapter)
Phone number
Please insert your country code with prefix 00 (not +)
Website (if applicable):
Twitter hashtag (If applicable):
Please describe the kinds of activities you foresee that your DSSGx Chapter will focus on in the coming 12-24 months: *
(examples can include events you want to organize, projects you want to work on, project partners you would like to partner with, etc.)
What is your funding situation? Are you planning to fundraise? *
DSSGx Guidelines, please read carefully
Table of Contents

1. Setting expectations
2. Rules for DSSGx Projects
3. Rules for DSSGx Events



Setting expectations

Over the last few years, we have been developing a worldwide community of data science enthusiasts, comprised of the Fellows, Tech Mentors and Project Managers that participate in our Summer Fellowships; the Project Partners that work with us across different economic sectors and social causes; the diverse Speakers of our events, that challenge our perspectives and minds; or the Universities that eagerly collaborate with us in different regions.

We invite you to be part of this movement and join us in applying data science to create positive social impact in a fair and equitable manner.

Apply to set up your own DSSGx chapter, bringing people together to help solve problems you care about in your community. We share below principles and rules of our community, which embody the values we stand for.

What you (DSSGxChapter) can expect from us (DSSG Foundation)?
- Become part of DSSG’s Global Community
- Project opportunities from worldwide partners
- Access to tools and educational material related to Data Science for Social Good
- Logo and brand identity to use in communication
- A link on our website
- Possibility to participate in DSSG global events
- Fundraising material
- Join our network to invite speakers

As an intrinsic part of our collaborative culture, all the knowledge and tools we have been developing over the last few years, by running training programs and events with a multitude of individuals and partner organizations all over the world, are publicly available to be used by the broader community. Thus, all our principles and guidelines to run events can be used generally, by any person/ organization.

What we (DSSG Foundation) expect from you (DSSGxChapter) ?
As you become part of our community we expect you to adhere to our values, and follow the rules for running events and projects (see below).



2. Rules for DSSGx Projects

DSSGx Projects are locally developed data science projects, where a team of data scientists and mentors comes together to work closely with Governments and nonprofits to take on real world problems in education, health, energy, public safety, transportation, among others.

A DSSGx Project is structured and developed by the local community, but all DSSGx Projects follow a set of common rules. Here you can find several examples of what a DSSGx Project looks like.


Who can host a DSSGx Project
DSSGx Projects can be run by approached DSSGx Chapters.


Culture and Values
DSSGx Projects should value diversity and inclusion, foster a safe and respectful environment and promote an open and collaborative culture
All projects should rigorously follow the DSSG Code of Conduct


Project Partners
Project Partners are typically, but not always, nonprofits and government organizations (city, state, or federal). They can also be corporations and startups with a social mission
Project Partners should meet the following criteria (we want to make an impact and want to work with partners who can best use our skills and resources to make that happen):
Have an important problem with high social impact: we want concrete problems that can have impact as opposed to vague research questions
Can give us access to data they’ve collected that is useful in solving that problem: it’s less about the size of the data, more about having the right data to solve the problem. We don’t release the data publicly and comply with any security and privacy procedures necessary but we need to be able to access the data remotely
Provide expertise about the problem area to the team: we are not experts in all “social good” areas and expect partners (who are the experts) to help us understand the data and the problem
Are likely to implement and use the work developed: we want our work to be used and having committed partners is critical for that to happen

Scoping Process
While choosing a project, you should take into account that a good project is made of:
A solvable problem (within your specific timeframe)
A challenging problem (that uses your team’s skills)
An important problem with social impact
A motivated, capable and committed partner
Appropriate, relevant data that you can access
During the scoping phase, and before commiting to a project and partner, is important to follow these steps (for more information on scoping, please check this DSSG’s Blog Post):
Set clear expectations - make sure the partner knows what is expected from his/ her organization, and what can he/she expect from your organization
Understand the Problem (e.g. what is the problem, how big is the problem, what kind of solutions were already tested, what are the main constraints)
Understand who are the main stakeholders (e.g. who are the challenge’s stakeholders, how do they relate with the problem, who are the data owners, who needs to approve data sharing)
Validate the data (e.g. get data sample and data dictionary from partner, what data exists internally, what are the data sources, what is the level of granularity of the data, how often is data collected, what data can be added from public/ external sources)
Check legal feasibility (e.g. discuss questions like confidentiality, open source code, and IP ownership)

Teams and Mentorship
You should guarantee your project’s team is not only comprised of motivated data scientists, but also an experienced mentor, with a strong data science background, who can guide and validate the team’s work, and a project manager, who can guarantee the project is moving forward, manage the relationship with the partner, and make sure the team is working effectively

Ethics and Responsible Use of Data Science
Be aware of relevant legislation and codes of practice within the industry in general and your challenge in particular
Use the minimum data necessary to achieve the desired outcome
Understand the limitations of your data when assessing if it is appropriate to use for a specific need
You must work within your skillset recognising where you do not have the skills or experience to use a particular approach or tool to a high standard
Make your work transparent on your Github and be accountable

Fundraising/ Pricing
You may not charge the partner organisation for work involved in doing the DSSGx projects with them.

Data and Knowledge Sharing
Both you and your project partner want to be protected under a legal agreement where the main principles of the project’s activities are defined. In this agreement, additionally to the common clauses of any agreement (e.g. term, termination, notices), you should make sure you specify the rules of:
intellectual property
confidentiality
project’s publicity
You also need to guarantee that your agreement respects the knowledge sharing rules with DSSG Foundation
All DSSGx Projects’ code needs to be shared on Github (either your own, or DSSG global repository here)
A brief project description (1 or 2 paragraphs), together with the partner logo will be included in DSSG Foundation’s website and other communication channels

Branding and Communication
Projects should be named in the format of “DSSGx [Project_Name]” - “DSSG” should be capitalized and “x” should be lowercase, without spaces in between
The only logo you should use is the one provided to you by DSSG Foundation. You should not use DSSG Foundation’s logo or any other logo belonging to this organization
Guarantee that all your local stakeholders, namely your project partner, apply these rules on their communication
DSSGx Projects should not be co-branded, neither should other logos be added to DSSGx logo. In case you would like to highlight other brands/ organizations that are supporting the project (e.g. a Foundation that is funding the project) you should add a “sponsors bar” on your communication, disconnected from the DSSGx logo

Evaluation
All the projects should be followed by a feedback survey (or a similar tool that allows feedback collection) to gather team and partner’s assessment and ideas, and support locations’ improvement



3. Rules for DSSGx Events

We believe in the power of our diverse community and organise ourselves to bring together the right people, to leverage our strengths and learn from each other to solve complex societal problems using data science. DSSGx Events are locally organized events that bring together passionate individuals and organizations, aiming to catalyse community’s dialogue and foster knowledge dissemination on data science, AI and Machine Learning fields.

A DSSGx Event is structured and developed by the local community, but all DSSGx Events follow a set of common rules. Examples of DSSGx Events include but are not limited to MeetUps, Hackathons, Educational Programs, Conferences.

Who can host a DSSGx Event
Only DSSGx chapters can organize DSSGx events.

Culture and Values
All events should follow the DSSG Code of Conduct of diversity and inclusion, foster a safe and respectful environment and promote an open and collaborative culture

Registration and Attendance
Events should be open to the public (with the exception of educational programs such as the Summer Fellowship, which might require a publically available application process)

Speakers
DSSGx Events should not have a commercial agenda for Speakers.
Ensure speakers have a very clear understanding of what your event is about and what is expected of them

Fundraising and Sponsors
If DSSGx Events are used for fundraising, this should be only to fund DSSGx related activities
You can charge your audience an attendance fee, to fundraise or cover any costs related to organizing the event.
You should promote fundraising from organizations that share DSSGx values and mission. For example, companies whose primary business is adult-oriented products/services, tobacco/cigarettes or weapons, ammunitions and defense, and alcohol drinks should not be considered as eligible sponsors for DSSGx Events
Sponsors must have no influence on Event’s program definition

Merchandising
If you decie to sell merchandise during your DSSGx Event. Please make sure you only use your specific DSSGx [Event_Name] logo

Branding and Communication
Events should be named in the format of “DSSGx [Event_Name]” - “DSSG” should be capitalized and “x” should be lowercase, without spaces in between
Clearly identify your event as a DSSGx Event in all communications
The only logo you should use is the one provided to you by DSSG Foundation.
Guarantee that all your local stakeholders, including speakers and sponsors, also apply these rules on their communication
DSSGx events can be integrated in conferences or events of professional organizations that share the values and goals of the DSSG Foundations.
DSSGx Events should not be co-branded, neither should other logos be added to DSSGx logo. In case you would like to highlight other brands/ organizations that are supporting the event (e.g. the organization that allows you to use the event’s venue for free) you should add a “sponsors bar” on your communication, disconnected from the DSSGx logo
Communication about the event should include information on local accessible services and spaces, including toilets, cafes and conference rooms

Media and Web
All press, audio and video contents specifically created for your DSSGx Event should be made publicly available via the DSSG Youtube channel, if requested by the Foundation.
All photos of DSSGx Events must be released under a Creative Commons license ("Attribution - NonCommercial - NonDerivative"), so they can be freely shared and reposted
Your website domain should be the name of your local DSSGx Event (e.g. www.dssgxeventname.com)
Additionally to the specific information your website should have about the specific event you are hosting, namely day, schedule, venue and program, you should also add a section called “About DSSGx Events”, which content is provided by DSSG Foundation
Social media profiles should be named as your DSSGx Event (“DSSGx [Event_Name]” and the corresponding official logo as the official image of each social network
Social media channels should not be used to communicate and sell sponsors and speakers services, products or business in general.

Evaluation
All the events should be followed by a feedback survey (or a similar tool that allows feedback collection) to gather participant’s assessment and ideas, and support locations’ improvement.

I, Chapter lead, hereby agree to ensure DSSGx guidelines will be enforced in my DSSGx Chapter. *
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