Caregiver Survey
Are you a Caregiver? The HEAL Project defines caregiver as a parent (biological, adoptive, or legal guardian), family member (grandparents, godparents, aunt/uncle, etc.), advocate, or educator who works with young people and children. Please help The HEAL Project with your input on caregivers needs, fears, and share your thoughts around communicating with children about sex.

In the survey below, "the children" refers to any child in your life that you may be raising, care for, educate, or advocate for.

The Caregiver Survey is created and copyrighted by The HEAL Project led by Ignacio Rivera. For more information, please visit www.igrivera.com. If you have any questions or concerns email heal2end@gmail.com.V8/18

In which city do you live?
Your answer
Which age group do you belong to? *
Which of these best describes your gender identity? Please check all that apply. If not indicated, add your gender identity below. *
Required
Which of these best describes your sexual orientation? Please check all that apply. If not indicated, add your sexual orientation below. *
Required
Which of these best describes your race, ethnicity, or cultural background? Please check all that apply. If not indicated, add your race, ethnicity, or cultural background below. *
Required
Which of these best describes your relationship with the children in your life? Please check all that apply. If not indicated, add your connection to children below. *
Required
If you have spoken with the children about consent, bodies, sex, and/or sexuality, at which age did these conversations begin?
Your answer
How often have you been (or would like to be) having a conversation about bodies, consent, sex, and sexuality with the children?
How strongly do you agree with each statement on concerns about speaking to the children about consent, bodies, sex, and sexuality? *
Strongly Agree
Agree
Not Sure
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
I don't have enough information to speak about these topics with the children.
I haven't reached an agreement with the childrens' other caregiver(s) around what should be discussed with them.
I am concerned that the children may discuss what they learn about these topics with other children and get in trouble.
I am concerned that learning about these topics would make the children interested in sex prematurely.
I am concerned that if I talk to the children about these topics, they will be more likely to engage in sexual activity.
I don't know what age would be appropriate to discuss these topics with the children.
I feel shame or guilt when trying to speak with the children about these topics.
My religious beliefs disapprove of discussing these topics with the children.
Please share other concerns you may have about speaking to the children about consent, bodies, sex, and/or sexuality.
Your answer
How strongly do you agree with each statement on conversations you have already had with the children about consent, bodies, sex, and sexuality? *
Strongly Agree
Agree
Not Sure
Disagree
Strongly Agree
We've had conversations about consent, setting boundaries, and accountability.
We've had conversations about the children's body and how it is similar to or different from other people's bodies.
We've had conversations about how the children's body will change during puberty.
We've had conversations about love, relationships, marriage, and relationship styles (monogamy, non-monogamy, etc.).
We've had conversations about desire, pleasure, and sex.
We've had conversations about gender identity, gender expression, and sexual orientation.
We've had conversations about the relationship between sex(uality) , race, gender, class, ability, and body image.
We've had conversations about STI and pregnancy prevention methods, and options to treat or cure STIs, and options to continue or end a pregnancy.
We've had conversations about sexual harassment, sexual assault, verbal and emotional abuse, and rape.
We've had conversations about resources (people, books, websites, etc.) that the children can use to gather more information.
Please share other related topics to consent, bodies, sex, and/or sexuality that you have discussed with the children.
Your answer
Comprehensive sex education is broadly defined as sex education that includes age-appropriate physical, mental, emotional, and social dimensions of human sexuality. Do you think you have had the resources to teach the children comprehensive sex education?
If you are a survivor of child sexual abuse or other forms of sexual violence, have you disclosed that to the children? If yes, why? If no, why not?
Your answer
How strongly do you agree with this statement? "Comprehensive sex education can help prevent and possibly end child sexual abuse." Please add your comments about this statement below, in the 'other' section.
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