SOC 303 Mid-Term Course Feedback
A teacher-student relationship is a professional relationship, not a personal one. So please carefully consider any comments you might want to make about my personal appearance, character, hygiene, etc. — it's unlikely that these will be relevant to the question of your educational experience in the classroom. Moreover, give a little thought to the tone of what you write here: criticisms delivered in a friendly, respectful manner are easier to take to heart, and to address. If you've ever browsed the comments of, say, a YouTube video, you know that commenting anonymously often seems to bring out the worst in us.

Along the same lines, I should like to make one final suggestion: start from a principle of charity. Assume that my heart is (more or less) in the right place and that I have a genuine interest in getting you to learn the material. So instead of speculating about my motives, or whether I like or dislike you, focus on what helps you learn the material or gets in the way of that learning—teaching, topics covered, reading assigned, grading policy, assignments, lab structure, time management, fairness, etc. The more details you can provide, the more helpful that will be for me as a teacher. (Note: this survey is heavily based on a template by Nick Carbone of MacMillan Higher Education.)

What questions does the course prompt you to ask? Do you find yourself asking these questions in your daily life?
Your answer
If I have critiqued your writing or comments you made in class discussions, was that done respectfully?
Your answer
Which assignments/labs did you find helpful, if any?
Teaching is an experiment. No teacher can control for all variables—the collection of students assembled, the class chemistry that will emerge, how an assignment will work. An assignment might work for some students and not others. But considering this question might give us both some insight into how you learn and what kind of learner you are.
Your answer
Is there any particular assignment/lab that you'd single out? If so, what made it especially helpful for you?
Your answer
What, if anything, motivated you to do better work?
Your answer
What about the grading policy made sense or seemed fair?
Your answer
What would improve the course, in your judgment?
'Constructive feedback' is the operative phrase here. Also, details are helpful. Instead of 'My professor is lazy', for example, you might say something like the following: 'In the syllabus, it said papers would be turned back within three days with comments. However, this semester, we only got our papers back in three days once. The average was five days, and for two assignments took even longer. Three of those times, we were not given more time to revise -- our next deadline held even though we lacked the time promised to get the work revised. The worst was the last assignment, when returned papers were five days late and we only got two days to revise a ten page paper that had extensive comments. This made it hard to plan work, and I had to cut into time I'd set aside for other courses. If it's going to take five days instead of three, please change the syllabus, and for every day late back, we should get a day extension on the next due date. But it would be better to just stay on schedule'.
Your answer
How would you improve this survey?
Feel free to cite chapter and verse from our course texts here.
Your answer
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