Bike Tour Impressions

    Stop #1: Naval Air Station Alameda Historic District

    Historic Legacy; Making Adaptive Reuse Economically Feasible • The Naval Air Station Alameda Historic District (Historic District) is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The Historic District as a whole is considered historically significant, with an important concentration and continuity of buildings. The individual buildings or cultural features in the Historic District lack distinction and are not independently eligible to be listed on the National Register. • Many of Alameda Point’s existing tenants are in the Historic District. Unfortunately, the Historic District also has some chronically vacant buildings that have deteriorated over the last two decades. • To encourage private reinvestment and adaptive reuse in the Historic District, a wide range of business and employment, as well as limited residential uses will be allowed in the Historic District. These may include office, research, light and heavy industrial and maritime uses. • The financially feasible redevelopment of Alameda Point property will almost certainly be unable to preserve every single contributing feature and building within the Historic District. Over the next 25 to 30 years, as Alameda Point is successfully developed, there will be significant impacts to the Historic District through alterations, modifications and some potential demolition of contributing features and buildings. • Having the flexibility to alter, modify, and/or demolish certain contributing buildings, facilities, spaces, or landscapes may be necessary to attract the private investment needed to get new uses into old buildings and/or current building code requirements. Such actions, however, would require a public hearing process before the Historic Advisory Board and for formal review and approval and will be subject to the City’s Historic Preservation Ordinance.

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    Stop #2: Northwest End of Alameda Point Sports Complex, Veterans Affairs Project and Open Space

    Large Recreational and Open Space; Making Adaptive Reuse Economically Feasible • A 44-acre sports complex will be located along the Oakland Estuary on portions of the existing runways adjacent to the existing gym, ball field and skate park. The sports complex may also include, additional ball fields, multi-purpose fields, volleyball and basketball courts, tennis courts, picnic areas, recreation buildings and other comparable active recreational amenities. • The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is planning a $200 million project on the runways at the north-west end of Alameda Point, which will include a 160,000 square foot out-patient clinic and columbarium. Construction is anticipated to start within the next three to five years. The VA will also own the southern portion of the runways where the endangered California Least Tern nests that is labeled “Nature Reserve” in the proposed zoning for Alameda Point. While the VA will be required to follow strict federal rules in administering this sensitive habitat, the City will have no real control over land use decisions on the federally owned property. • The Northwest Territories open space will be a major national or regional passive recreational asset along the Oakland Estuary waterfront with some of the best panoramic views of San Francisco Bay. This area will include trails, picnic areas, viewing areas, wetlands and parking lots. These parklands complement the adjacent Nature Reserve. • The City is planning to spend $175 million on flood protection and storm drain improvements for Alameda Point. Strategies to protect against sea level rise include raising the grade in certain parts of Alameda Point, such as the Enterprise sub-district, and building levees. • Parts of the Bay Trail along the estuary shoreline will be designed on top of a berm and incorporated into the mitigation plans for sea level rise. • It is currently being proposed that the passive open space in the Northwest Territories be left unprotected from sea level rise and transition to more wetlands over time.

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    Stop #3: Main Street Neighborhood and Alameda Point Collaborative

    Variety of Residential Options; Relocation of APC and Master Planning Process to Provide Detailed Housing Guidelines • The 140-acre Main Street Neighborhood zoning sub-district will be a mixed-use residential neighborhood with a variety of building types and complementary small-scale, neighborhood serving commercial, service uses, urban agriculture and parks. • The district will build upon many of its existing assets and features including the “O’Club” community center and the historic “Big White” homes and their distinctive “beehive” street network. • This sub-district includes approximately 500 residents from three supportive housing providers for formerly homeless residents: Alameda Point Collaborative (APC), Building Futures for Women and Children, and Operation Dignity. • APC operates the Ploughshares Nursery, which recently broke ground on a new, 2,500 square foot retail space, and the Changing Gears Bike Shop that sells both refurbished and new bicycles, to provide workforce training opportunities for its residents. APC also operates an urban farm that supplies fresh produce for its residents. • The existing Supportive Housing Units may be relocated into a new well-designed neighborhood center with multifamily housing, community spaces, supportive facilities and job training facilities for formerly homeless veterans, women and children and other at-risk populations. Financing will require a combination of public and private resources. • The Main Street Neighborhood will require a Master Plan public process and final document before construction may begin. The Master Plan will provide more detailed building design and zoning guidelines for the mix of uses and building styles envisioned for the neighborhood.

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    Stop #4: Entry District

    Stitching the Town Center into the Existing Alameda Fabric; Gradual Increase of Building Heights and Density Near Town Center • Ralph Appezzato Memorial Parkway would be reconstructed and re-aligned to provide the main entrance to Alameda Point and create a view corridor towards the Seaplane Lagoon and San Francisco Bay from the entry to Alameda Point. Buildings would face onto Ralph Appezzato Parkway to support a pedestrian friendly environment. • Residential homes will continue on the western side of Main Street at Ralph Appezzato Parkway, across from the Bayport neighborhood and other Main Street residential areas. • Ralph Appezzato Parkway will be designed to “de-emphasize the automobile” including: similarly designed Alameda-sized blocks, a protected bicycle lane, a right of way for two transit-exclusive lanes, and two travel lanes for cars. • Bicycle and pedestrian access would be provided to the waterfront open space and to the water’s edge from Ralph Appezzato Parkway while automobiles would not have direct access to the water’s edge from Ralph Appezzato Parkway. • The allowable building heights and density will gradually increase along Ralph Appezzato Parkway, from east to west. Blocks facing Main Street would be 2- to 3-story residential buildings compatible with the adjacent Bayport neighborhood. • Blocks midway along Ralph Appezzato Parkway would allow 3- to 5-story buildings. Ground floor non-residential is permitted, but not required. • Blocks near to and at the corner of the Seaplane Lagoon with Ralph Appezzato Parkway within the retail core of the project would allow 4- to 5-story buildings. Mixed-use will be required. Ground floor must be non-residential along primary retail frontage.

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    Stop #5: Employment Center

    Opportunity Sites for New Office Campuses and Maritime Industries; Buffer between Enterprise and Sub-district and Residential Neighborhoods • The Enterprise zoning sub-district is envisioned to be Alameda Point’s main employment center. It provides approximately 107 acres of prime real estate for new high-quality research and development, industrial, manufacturing and office uses. The Enterprise sub-district provides opportunities for new construction to accommodate modern uses and specialized industry needs in high quality, well-designed buildings. • To the south and along the eastern edge of the Seaplane Lagoon, maritime and commercial uses similar to those that currently operate in the sub-district would be allowed to continue and expand into existing and new buildings. These uses include the MARAD fleet, maritime contractors, and the future regional Water Emergency Transportation Authority (WETA) facility. • WETA is planning to build an Alameda Point Emergency Operations and Maintenance Facility. The proposed facility will be at the southern shoreline of the Enterprise sub-district, near the USS Hornet, and will provide reliable, emergency ferry access should a major seismic event or other natural disaster affect access to/from Alameda. • Many large commercial and light industrial uses do not want to be located directly adjacent to residential neighborhoods. This was the case with the City’s recent experience with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the possible locations for its Second Campus and with employment uses at Harbor Bay Business Park. • In order to encourage and facilitate job growth, zoning standards for this area would be limited to productive business and other compatible commercial uses. Residential uses may be conditionally permitted in areas adjacent to Main Street, if it can be found that the residential use will not impede or restrict adjacent non-residential uses within the Sub-district.

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    Stop #6: Alameda Point Town Center

    Creating a Sense of Place; Building on the Taxiway and Potential for Landmark Building • The public plaza or space—where Ralph Appezzato Parkway ends at Seaplane Lagoon—will be the center, or “action corner”, of a retail and visitor-serving core. The space might be accented by a landmark building at the foot of Ralph Appezzato Parkway. • People will be able to enjoy a variety of waterfront experiences with outdoor dining patios overlooking the Seaplane Lagoon, a pedestrian promenade, and access ramps for kayaks and other water recreational uses. • Ferry service, marina, recreational boating uses will be concentrated along the eastern edge of the Seaplane Lagoon near the retail core. Water uses will become less intense and more passive as one moves toward the western edge of the Seaplane Lagoon and the Least Tern habitat on the federal property. • To create an interim, immediate sense of place, existing buildings might be modified for special events, containers might be used for “pop-up” retail spaces, and outdoor spaces may be improved with temporary structures and open space facilities. • The plans propose new buildings on the vast 33-acre, concrete taxiway along the northern edge of the Seaplane Lagoon considered a historic cultural landscape. Use of this valuable real estate may help off-set costly public infrastructure. • New buildings and streets would preserve the axial alignment of the existing hangars and respect view corridor consistent with the Historic District and building heights will be limited by the height of the existing hangar buildings. • Another proposal is the potential for a landmark building on the eastern side of Seaplane Lagoon, incorporating a building height taller than 5 stories. The City would require exceptional architectural features and other requirements for a structure to exceed a 5-story height limit.

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    Stop #7: Seaplane Lagoon

    Broad Range of Waterfront Experiences; Unprotected Areas for Natural Transition to Wetlands • Due to its vast scale, the Seaplane Lagoon will be able to support a wide variety of unique waterfront experiences. More active and urban uses will be concentrated near the northeast corner of the Seaplane Lagoon, near the heart of the Town Center. • The eastern side of Seaplane Lagoon is intended for marinas, docks, eating patios, and future ferry service. On the northern edge there will be promenades and active recreational opportunities, such as pedestrian paths, open lawn, and kayak access. The western side, adjacent to the Nature Reserve and the VA facility, will include a natural edge and the eventual creation of adaptive wetlands. • New adaptive wetlands and tidal marshes may be created on the western edge Seaplane Lagoon to create natural areas. As with the Northwest Territories, it is currently being proposed that the western edge be “de-paved” and left unprotected from sea level rise and transition to wetlands over time. This area will ultimately become inundated and becomes a passive natural open space area for wildlife.

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    Stop #8: Spirit’s Alley

    Economic Opportunities along Monarch Street; Limited New Construction Due to Endangered Species Habitat • There is tremendous potential for Monarch Street and the immediate vicinity to become a hub for specialty beverage producers (wine, beer, and spirits). Two prominent businesses in this sector already call Monarch Street their home: St. George Spirits and Rock Wall Winery. Faction Brewery is scheduled to open here by the end of the year. Rosenblum Cellars, one of the most storied urban wineries in the country, is located less than a mile away. • The Northern end of Monarch Street is anchored by Michaan’s Auctions and the monthly Antiques by the Bay along the runways, which is the largest antiques show in northern California with over 800 dealer booths. • The majestic vistas of San Francisco from the large hangars that attract specialty beverage businesses on Monarch Street are protected by the Nature Reserve for the endangered California Least Tern. While the Biological Opinion prepared by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service safeguards the bird’s nesting habitat, it also restricts new construction and commercial uses along Monarch Avenue and the immediate vicinity.

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